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The Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina 




BULLETIN 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1948 - 1949 
Announcements for 1949-1950 



VOLUME XXXVm APRIL, 1949 NUMBER 3 

PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES DURING THE YEAR IN 
JANUARY, FEBRUARY, APRIL, AND NOVEMBER BY 
THE COLLEGE AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofwomans19491950 






BULLETIN OP 



THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1948-1949 
Announcements for 1949-1950 



ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER AT THE POST OFFICE 

AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA, FEBRUARY 24, 1936 

UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912 



1949 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


1950 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 1112 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 





COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Session 1949-1950 
1949 

June 6 Monday, Summer Session Registration. 

June 7 Tuesday, Classwork begins. 

July 15 Friday, Examinations. 

September 12 Monday 6:30 p.m., Faculty Meeting. 

September 13 Tuesday 9 :00 a.m., Freshman Week begins. 

September 14 Wednesday 8:00 a.m., Examinations to remove 

condition grades. 
September 15 Thursday 8:30 a.m., Freshmen consult advisers. 

Registration of Commercial students. 

9:00 a.m., Juniors and Seniors consult advisers. 

10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Freshmen complete registra- 
tion. 
September 16 Friday 8:30 a.m., Sophomores consult advisers. 

10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sophomores, Juniors, and 

Seniors complete registration. 
September 17 Saturday, Classwork of First Semester begins. 

September 24 Saturday, Last day for changes in courses. 

October 5 Wednesday, Founder's Day. 

November 23 Wednesday 11:00 a.m., Thanksgiving Recess begins. 

November 28 Monday 8:00 a.m., Thanksgiving Recess ends. 

December 21 Wednesday 11:00 a.m., Christmas Recess begins. 

1950 

January 3 Tuesday 8:00 a.m., Christmas Recess ends. 

January 19 Thursday, Reading Day. 

January 20-26 Friday through Thursday, Examinations. 

January 30 Monday 8:30 a.m., Freshmen consult advisers. 

8:30 a.m., Juniors and Seniors consult advisers. 

10:00 a.m., Sophomores consult advisers. 

1:30 p.m.-4 :30 p.m., Freshmen complete registration. 
January 31 Tuesday 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sophomores, Juniors, 

and Seniors complete registration. 
February 1 Wednesday, Classwork of Second Semester begins. 

February 6 Monday, Last day for changes in courses. 

March 25 Saturday 11:00 a.m., Spring Recess begins. 

April 3 Monday 8:00 a.m., Spring Recess ends. 

May 19 Friday, Reading Day. 

May 20-26 Saturday through Friday, Examinations. 

May 27, 28, 29 Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Commencement. 

June 5 Monday, Summer Session begins. 

July 14 Friday, Summer Session ends. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I Organization 5 

Trustees 5 

Officers of Administration 9 

Officers of Instruction 9 

Standing Committees 27 

II The College 30 

III Expenses 44 

IV Admission 56 

V Degrees 58 

VI Academic Regulations 73 

VII Courses of Instruction 79 

VIII Faculty, Administrative Staff, and Other Personnel 199 

IX Student List 219 

X Index 292 



L ORGANIZATION 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 

The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 

Greensboro 
The State College of Agriculture and Engineering of the 

University of North Carolina, Raleigh 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Robert Gregg Cherry, Governor, Chiarman ex officio, Raleigh 

Arch Turner Allen, Secretary, Raleigh 

1 1948: John Sprunt Hill, John J. Parker, Edwin Pate 

^ISZO: Mrs. Laura Weill Cone, Mrs. May L. Tomlison, Victor S. 

Bryant 
*1952: Clarence Poe, Clyde K. Council, Thomas J. Pearsall 
*1954: J. C. B. Ehringhaus, John W. Clark, John W. Umstead, Jr. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Robert Gregg Cherry, Governor, Chairman ex officio 

Clyde A. Erwin, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex officio 

Arch Turner Allen, Secretary 

TRUSTEES FOR LIFE 

Cameron Morrison, Governor, 1921-1925 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Governor 1929-1933 

Clyde R. Hoey, Governor 1937-1941 

Joseph Melville Broughton, Governor, 1941-1945 

Governor Robert Gregg Cherry, 1945- 



Term Expires April 1, 1949 

Miss Emily Austin Tarboro 

Miss Annie Moore Cherry Red Springs 



David Clark 
James H. Clark 
Clyde K. Council 
Benjamin B. Everett 
Mrs. R. S. Ferguson 
James S. Ficklen 
James Alexander Gray 
R. L. Harris 
W. E. Horner 
Hugh Horton 



Charlotte 

Elizabethtown 

Wannish 

Palmyra 

Taylorsville 

Greenville 

Winston-Salem 

Roxboro 

Sanford 

Williamston 



Edgecombe 
(Appointed 
from Halifax) 
Mecklenburg 
Bladen 
Columbus 
Halifax 
Burke 
Pitt 

Forsyth 
Person 
Lee 
Martin 



^erm expires July 1 of year indicated. 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



Robert Eugene Little 


Wadesboro 


Anson 


Dan K. Moore 


Sylva 


Jackson 


Thomas J. Pearsall 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


J. Hawley Poole 


West End 


Moore 


J. A. Pritchett 


Windsor 


Bertie 


Claude W. Rankin 


Fayetteville 


Cumberland 


Dr. Foy Roberson 


Durham 


Durham 


T. Clarence Stone 


Stoneville 


Rockingham 


W. Frank Taylor 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


Mrs. May Lovelace Tomlison 


High Point 


Guilford 


F. E. Wallace 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Graham Woodard 


Wilson 


Wilson 


Term Expires April 1, 1951 




Arch Turner Allen 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Edward Stephenson Askew 


Oriental 


Pamlico 


Kemp Davis Battle 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


James Albert Bridger 


Bladenboro 


Bladen 


Charles Albert Cannon 


Concord 


Cabarrus 


Thurmond Chatham 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


William Grimes Clark 


Tarboro 


Edgecombe 


Arthur M. Dixon 


Gastonia 


Gaston 


Frank Wills Hancock, Jr. 


Oxford 


Granville 


Charles A. Jonas 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


Arthur H. London 


Pittsboro 


Chatham 


Mrs. Saddu McBrayer McCain 


Southern Pines 


Moore 


2 Mrs. Gertrude Dills McKee 


Sylva 


Jackson 


Raymond Maxwell 


New Bern 


Craven 


Reid Atwood Maynard 


Burlington 


Alamance 


Andrew L. Monroe 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Kemp Battle Nixon 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


John J. Parker 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Robert Wright Proctor 


Marion 


McDowell 


Benjamin Franklin Royal 


Morehead City 


Carteret 


William B. Shuford 


Hickory 


Catawba 


Mrs. Grace Taylor Rodenbough 


Danbury 


Stokes 


Term Expires April 1, 1953 




Wade Barber 


Pittsboro 


Chatham 


Samuel M. Blount 


Washington 


Beaufort 


Victor S. Bryant 


Durham 


Durham 


Miss Gertrude Carraway 


New Bern 


Craven 


John W. Clark 


Franklinville 


Randolph 


Collier Cobb, Jr. 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


George S. Coble 


Lexington 


Davidson 


Mrs. Laura Weill Cone 


Greensboro 


Guilford 



2 Deceased. 



Trustees 



John G. Dawson 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Joseph C. Eagles 


Wilson 


Wilson 


W. Roy Hampton 


Plymouth 


Washington 


John Sprunt Hill 


Durham 


Durham 


B. K. Lassiter 


Oxford 


Granville 


John Q. LeGrand 


Wilmington 


New Hanover 


Henry A. Lineberger 


Gastonia 


Gaston 


Mrs. Frances Newsom Miller 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Glenn C. Palmer 


Waynesville 


Haywood 


Edwin Pate 


Laurinburg 


Scotland 


James C. Pittman 


Sanford 


Lee 


J. E. Ramsey 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


Roy Rowe 


Burgaw 


Pender 


J. Benton Stacy 


Ruffin 


Rockingham 


Kenneth S. Tanner 


Spindale 


Rutherford 


William B. Um stead 


Durham 


Durham 


E. Leigh Winslow 


Hertford 


Perquimans 


Term Expii 


res April 1, 1955 




H. D. Bateman 


Wilson 


Wilson 


WlLBER H. CURRIE 


Carthage 


Moore 


P. B. Ferrebee 


Andrews 


Cherokee 


Ben E. Fountain 


Rocky Mount 


Edgecombe 


0. Max Gardner, Jr. 


Shelby 


Cleveland 


H. S. GIBBS 


Morehead City 


Carteret 


A. H. Harris 


Oriental 


Pamlico 


Ira T. Johnston 


Jefferson 


Ashe 


Vernon G. James 


Elizabeth City 


Pasquotank 


John H. Kerr, Jr. 


Warrenton 


Warren 


John G. Kesler 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


M. C. Lassiter 


Snow Hill 


Greene 


J. Spencer Love 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


W. L. Lumpkin 


Louisburg 


Franklin 


H. B. Marrow 


Smithfield 


Johnston 


L. P. McLendon 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


William D. Merritt 


Roxboro 


Person 


J. F. Milliken 


Monroe 


Union 


Rudolph I. Mintz 


Southport 


Brunswick 


Rosa B. Parker 


Albemarle 


Stanly 


Clarence Poe 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Carl A. Rudisill 


Cherryville 


Gaston 


'George M. Stephens 


Asheville 


Buncombe 


John W. Umstead, Jr. 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


3 Lionel Weil 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 



8 Deceased. 



THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

(Office at Chapel Hill) 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., L.L.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President. 
William Donald Carmichael, Jr., S.B.Comm., Controller. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 
Woman's College at Greensboro 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Chancellor of the College and 

Vice-President of the University. 
Albert S. Keister, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
Mereb E. Mossman, B.A., M.A., Professor of Sociology. 
Emily Holmes Watkins, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of 

Mathematics. 
Leonard B. Hurley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Robert Burton House, B.A., M.A., LL.D., Chancellor and 

Vice-President of the University. 
Herman Glenn Baity, B.A., B.S. in C.E., M.S., Sc.D., Professor of 

Sanitary Engineering and Acting Dean of the School of Public 

Health. 
William Smith Wells, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English and 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
John Nathaniel Couch, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D., Kenan Professor of 

Botany. 
John Brooks Woosley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering at Raleigh 

John William Harrelson, B.E., M.E., LL.D., Chancellor of the College 

and Vice-President of the University. 
Donald Benton Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
William Edward Shinn, M.S., Professor of Textiles. 
Clarence Bonner Shulenberger, M.A., Professor of Accounting. 
Lillian Lee Vaughan, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

8 






THE FACULTY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President. 

A.B., 1909 (North Carolina) ; M.A., 1916 (Columbia) ; LL.D. (Birmingham-South- 
ern, Davidson, Duke, William and Mary, Wake Forest, Harvard, Amherst) ; 
D.C.L. (Catawba) ; D.Litt. (Columbia). 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Chancellor of the College and 
Vice-President of the University. 

B.S., 1900, LL.D., 1926 (Mercer) ; (University of Chicago). 

Katherine Taylor, B.A., M.A., Dean of Women. 

B.A., 1928 (North Carolina College for Women); M.A., 1929 (Radcliffe). 

*Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar. 

Diploma, 1903 (The North Carolina College for Women). 

John C. Lockhart, B.A., Assistant Controller and Business Manager. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1912. 

George M. Joyce, B.S., M.S., Auditor. 

Indiana State Teachers College, B.S., 1930, Indiana University, M.S., 1935; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1939. 

Ruth M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Physician. 

Pomona College, B.A., 1919 ; University of Pennsylvania, M.D., 1923. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 

(Arranged — with the exception of the first two — within each ranking 
in order of academic seniority. For alphabetical list see page 199.) 
Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President. 

A.B., 1909 (North Carolina) ; M.A., 1916 (Columbia) ; LL.D. (Birmingham- 
Southern, Davidson, Duke, William and Mary, Wake Forest, Harvard, Amherst) ; 
D.C.L. (Catawba) ; D. Litt. (Columbia). 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Chancellor of the College and 
Vice-President of the University. 

B.S., 1900, LL.D., 1926 (Mercer) ; (University of Chicago). 

Mary M. Petty, B.S., Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., 1885 (Wellesley) ; (Bryn Mawr). 

Caroline B. Schoch, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of German. 

Ph.B., 1907 (Chicago) ; M.A., 1919 (Wisconsin) ; (University of Marburg, Ger- 
many). 

Winfield S. Barney, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

B.A., 1905 (Dartmouth) ; M.A., 1911 (Hobart) ; Ph.D., 1916 (Syracuse). 

John Paul Givler, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of Biology. 

Ph.B„ 1906, M.A., 1912 (Hamline) ; (Johns Hopkins). 



^Deceased, October 8, 1948. 
B Retired August 31, 1948. 



10 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

•Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar, Professor. 

Diploma, 1903 (North Carolina College for Women). 

7 Cornelia Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., 1903 (Cornell) ; M.A., 1931 (Michigan). 

Alonzo C Hall, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1910 (Elon) ; M.A., 1913 (Columbia). 

William Raymond Taylor, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1915 (North Carolina) ; M.A., 1916 (Harvard). 

James Albert Highsmith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., 1910, M.A., 1915 (North Carolina) ; Ph.D., 1923 (George Peabody). 

Clarence D. Johns, B.A., M.A., Professor of History. 

B.A., 1908 (Randolph-Macon) ; M.A., 1911 (Chicago) ; (Harvard) ; (Chicago). 

Glenn R. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., 1915 (Reed) ; M.A., 1916 (Columbia). 

Leonard Burwell Hurley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1913, M.A., 1916 (Duke) ; Ph.D., 1932 (North Carolina). 

Albert S. Keister, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

B.A., 1910 (Otterbein) ; M.A., 1911 (Columbia) ; Ph.D., 1927 (Chicago). 

Ruth Fitzgerald, B.S., M.A., Professor of Education. 

Diploma 1905 (North Carolina College for Women) ; B.S., 1925, M.A., 1926 
(Columbia) ; (Chicago). 

Malcolm K. Hooke, B.A., D.de TUniv., Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

B.A., 1918 (Chattanooga) ; Diplome, d'etudes de Civilisation francaise, 1921 ; 
Docteur de l'Universit6 de Paris, 1926. 

George M. Thompson, B.Mus., M.Mus., Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., 1915, M.Mus., 1920 (Beaver) ; (Pittsburgh Musical Institute) ; (Chicago 
College of Music) ; (Pupil of Clarence Eddy of Chicago and Joseph Bonnet of 

Paris). 

J. Arthur Dunn, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1908, M.A., 1909 (Missouri). 

Helen Barton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., 1913 (Goucher) ; M.A., 1922, Ph.D., 1926 (Johns Hopkins). 

Margaret Messenger Edwards, B.S., M.A., Professor of Home 
Economics. 

B.S., 1912 (Montana State) ; M.A., 1920 (Columbia) ; (Cornell) ; (Chicago). 

Florence Louise Schaeffer, B.A., M.A., Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., 1920 (Barnard) ; M.A., 1922 (Mount Holyoke) ; (Yale). 

RUTH M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Physician and Professor of Health. 

B.A., 1919 (Pomona) ; M.D., 1923 (Pennsylvania). 

H. Hugh Altvater, B.A., M.Mus., Dean of the School of Music, Pro- 
fessor of Music. 

B.A., 1920, Mus.M., 1929 (Michigan) ; Mus.M., 1925 (Southwestern). 



•Deceased, October 8, 1948. 
'Retired August 31, 1948. 



Faculty 11 

Meta Helena Miller, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages, 

B.A., 1917 (Goucher) ; M.A., 1919, Ph.D., 1922 (Johns Hopkins) ; Certificat 
d'etudes pratiques de prononciation francaise de phonetique (Universite de Paris, 
1931). 

Oliver Perry Clutts, B.S., M.A., Professor of Education. 

B.S., 1913 (Ohio) ; M.A., 1917 (Columbia). 

George P. Wilson, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1913 (North Carolina) ; M.A., 1919 (Columbia) ; (Wisconsin). 

Elizabeth Duffy, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., 1925 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1926 (Columbia) ; Ph.D., 
1928 (Johns Hopkins). 

Mabel N. Swanson, B.S., M.S., Dietitian, Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1926 (Washington) ; M.S., 1930 (Columbia). 

"Victoria Carlsson Nielson, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of 
Health. 

B.Sc, 1922, M.Sc, M.A., 1923, Ph.D., 1929 (Columbia). 

Gregory D. Ivey, B.S., M.A., Professor of Art. 

B.S., 1928 (Central Missouri State) ; M.A., 1932 (Columbia). 

Charles Wiley Phillips, B.A., M.A., Director of Public Relations, 
Professor. 

B.A., 1921 (North Carolina) ; M.A., 1927 (Columbia). 

Franklin Holbrook McNutt, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Associate Dean 
of the Graduate School of the University, Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1916, M.A., 1918 (Wittenberg) ; Ph.D., 1932 (Ohio State) ; LL.D., 1938 
(Dayton). 

Jane Summerell, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1910 and 1922 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1924 (Columbia). 

Alleine Richard Minor, B.S., Professor of Piano. 

Diploma, 1912 (Meredith) ; B.S., 1930 (Columbia) ; (New England Conservatory 
of Music). 

Elva Eudora Barrow, B.A., M.S., Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., 1911 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College) ; M.S., 1923 (Chicago). 

Magnhilde Gullander, B.A., M.A., Professor of History. 

B.A., 1916 (Wisconsin) ; M.A., 1925 (Pennsylvania). 

Archie D. Shaftesbury, B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

B.A., 1920 (Southwestern) ; Ph.D., 1934 (Johns Hopkins) 

James W. Painter, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1920 (Emory and Henry) ; M.A., 1923 (Tennessee) ; (Chicago) ; (North 
Carolina) . 

Charlton C. Jernigan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Classical Civila- 
zation. 

B.A., 1925, M.A., 1926, Ph.D., 1935 (Duke) ; (University of Chicago). 

Eugene E. Pfaff, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

B.A., 1930, M.A., 1934 (North Carolina) ; Ph.D., 1936 (Cornell). 



"Retired August 31, 1948. 



12 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Marc Friedlaender, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

B.A., 1926 (Princeton) ; M.A., 1929 (Harvard) ; Ph.D., 1938 (Chicago). 

Charles Marshall Adams, B.A., B.S., M.A., Librarian, Professor. 

B.A., 1931 (Amherst) ; B.S., 1933, M.A., 1942 (Columbia). 

Ellen Penn, B.S., M.A., Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1929 (Kansas State Teachers College) ; M.A., 1939 (Columbia). 

Mereb E. Mossman, B.A., M.A., Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., 1926 (Morningside) ; M.A., 1928 (Chicago). 

GEORGE M. Joyce, B.S., M.A., Professor in Commercial Department. 

B.S., 1930 (Indiana State Teachers) ; M.S., 1935 (Indiana) ; (Pittsburgh). 

Dennis Hargrove Cooke, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Director of Summer Ses- 
sion, Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1925, M.Ed., 1928 (Duke) ; Ph.D., 1930 (Peabody). 

Katherine Taylor, B.A., M.A., Professor, Dean of Women. 

B.A., 1928 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1929 (Radcliffe). 

Ethel L. Martus, B.A., M.S., Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., 1929 (Brown) ; M.S., 1931 (Wellesley). 

Vance T. Littlejohn, B.A., B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Profesor of Business 
Education. 

B.A., B.S., 1931 (Bowling Green College of Commerce) ; M.Ed., 1935, Ph.D., 
1948 (Pittsburgh). 

Inez Coldwell, B.A., Associate Professor of Biology. 

B.A., 1915 (Southwestern) ; (Johns Hopkins). 

Ren£ Hardre, prof, des E.N., Associate Professor of French. 

C.E.N., 1908 (Angers) ; C.A.P., 1911 (Rennes) ; (University of Caen) ; Professorat 
des Ecoles Normales, Paris, 1919) ; (University of London) ; (University of Edin- 
burgh) ; (Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur) ; (Officier de l'lnstruction Publique). 

M. Josephine Kremer, B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Home Economics. 

B.A., 1922 (Ohio Wesleyan) ; Ph.D., 1938 (Cornell). 

Mildred Rutherford Gould, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

B.S., 1907, M.A., 1921 (Columbia). 

Abigail E. Rowley, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

B.S., 1915 (Denison) ; M.A., 1921 (Columbia). 

Augustine LaRochelle, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., 1916 (Vermont) ; M.A., 1921 (Columbia) ; Diploma (Centro de Estudios 
Histdricos, Madrid). 

Herbert Kimmel, B.A., Ph.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion. 

B.A., 1908 (Indiana) ; Ph.M., 1909 (Chicago) ; Ph.D., 1935 (North Carolina). 

Helen Ingraham, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Biology. 

B.S., 1918 (Knox) ; M.S., 1921 (Chicago). 

b Mary Lois Ferrell, Associate Professor of Piano. 

Diploma, 1916 (Meredith) ; Graduate in Music, 1919 (Northwestern) ; (Pupil of 
Ernest Hutcheson and Emil Sauer). 



•Deceased, December 19, 1948. 



Faculty 13 

Nettie Sue Tillett, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., 1913 (Duke) ; M.A., 1924 (Columbia). 

Bernice Evelyn Draper, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of History. 

B.A., 1919 (Lawrence) ; M.A., 1922 (Wisconsin). 

Vera Largent, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of History. 

B.A., 1915 (Knox) ; M.A., 1923 (Chicago). 

Viva M. Playfoot, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1925, M.A., 1931 (Columbia). 

Lila Belle Love, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.A., 1916 (Mississippi State College for Women) ; M.S., 1921 (Nebraska) ; 
(Chicago) ; (Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and Hygiene). 

John Aaron Smith, B.Ed., M.S., Associate Professor of Education. 

B.Ed., 1916 (Illinois State Normal) ; M.S., 1926 (Illinois). 

Maude Williams, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

B.A., 1924, M.S., 1926, Ph.D., 1946 (Illinois). 

Albert Frederick Thiel, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Botany. 

B.A., 1916 (Minnesota) ; M.A., 1917 (Nebraska) ; Ph.D., 1931 (Chicago). 

Lyda Gordon Shivers, B.A., LL.D., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor 
of Sociology. 

B.A., 1928, LL.D., 1930, M.A., 1930 (Mississippi) ; Ph.D., 1935 (North Carolina). 

Louise Brevard Alexander, B.A., Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 

B.A., 1907 (Presbyterian College) ; (Tennessee) ; (North Carolina). 

Emily Holmes Watkins, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

B.A., 1916 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College) ; M.A., 1926 (Columbia). 

MARD3 B. Denneen, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1912, M.A., 1922 (Minnesota). 

John E. Bridgers, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
English. 

B.A., 1923 (Duke) ; M.A., 1925 (Harvard) ; Ph.D., 1941 (Duke). 

Mildred Pearl Harris, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Health. 

B.A., 1921, M.A., 1924 (Michigan). 

Edna Arundel, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography. 

B.A., 1921 (Ohio University) ; M.A., 1929 (Columbia) ; Ph.D., 1942 (Yale). 

Patty Spruill, B.S., B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Business Edu- 
cation. 

B.S., 1912, B.A., 1926 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1937 (New 
York University). 

Alice Katherine Abbott, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., 1921 (Smith) ; M.A., 1927 (Illinois) ; (Centro de Estudios Historicos, 
Madrid). 



14 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Agnes N. Coxe, B.L., B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

B.L., 1919 (Flora Macdonald) ) ; B.S., 1927 (North Carolina College for Women); 
M.A., 1930 (Columbia). 

Madeleine Blakey Street, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Home 
Economics. 

B.S., 1922 (William and Mary) ; M.A., 1931 (Columbia). 

Helen Burns, B.A., M.A., Freshman Class Chairman, Associate Pro- 
fessor. 

B.A., 1925 (Iowa); M.A., 1937 (Columbia). 

ANNA Joyce Reardon, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

B.A., 1930 (College of Saint Teresa) ; M.S., 1933, Ph.D., 1937 (St. Louis). 

Ruth Agnes Shaver, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1922 (Ohio Wesleyan) ; M.A., 1926 (Columbia) ; (Sorbonne, Paris) ; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble, France). 

Coy T. Phillips, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography. 

'B.A., 1930 (North Carolina) ; M.A., 1938 (Colorado) ; Ph.D., 1945 (North 
Carolina). 

William C. DeVeny, B.A., B.Mus., Associate Professor of Music. 

B.A., 1926 (North Central) ; B.Mus., 1933 (Oberlin Conservatory). 

Martha V. Doran, B.S., M.D., Associate Physician, Associate Professor. 

B.A., 1922 (Toronto) ; M.D., 1943 (Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania). 

Randall Jarrell, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., 1935, M.A., 1939 (Vanderbilt). 

Bess Naylor Rosa, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1914, M.A., 1917 (Missouri); (Merrill Palmer School). 

Evelyn Louise Howell, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

B.S., 1932 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.S., 1942 
(North Carolina). 

Herbert E. Vaughan, Jr., B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., 1936 (Wofford) ; M.A., 1941 (George Peabody). 

Helen Frances Cutting, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., 1921 (Adelphi) ; M.A., 1930 (Columbia) ; M.A., 1933 (Chicago) ; (Centro de 
Estudios Historicos, Madrid). 

ANNA Reger, B.A., B.S., Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1916 (West Virginia Wesleyan) ; B.S., 1931 (Columbia). 

ANNA M. Kreimeier, Ph.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Ph.B., 1923 (Chicago) ; M.A., 1937 (Columbia) ; (University of London). 

Mary Fitzgerald, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Diploma, 1908, B.A., 1930 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1940 
(Columbia). 

Harriett Mehaffie, Ph.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Ph.B., 1926 (Chicago) ; M.A., 1941 (Michigan). 

Ruth Gunter, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1925 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1930 (Columbia). 



Faculty 15 

Virginia Christian Farinholt, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Spanish. 

(Alliance Frangaise, Paris) ; B.A., 1928 (William and Mary) ; M.A., 1930, Ph.D., 
1936 (Chicago) ; (Universidad Nacional de Mexico, 1946). 

Birdie Helen Holloway, B.S.M., M.S.M., Assistant Professor of Music 
Education. 

B.S.M., 1926, M.S.M., 1931 (Oberlin). 

Maude L. Adams, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Educa- 
tion. 

B.A., 1914 (Cornell College) ; M.A., 1935 (Iowa). 

Dorothy Davis, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., 1928 (Western College) ; M.A., 1930 (Wisconsin). 

Helen Thrush, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.F.A., 1927 (Pennsylvania) ; M.A., 1930 (Columbia). 

May Dulaney Bush, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., 1923 (Hollins) ; M.A., 1928 (Columbia) ; Ph.D., 1942 (Johns Hopkins). 

Josephine Hege, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., 1927 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1939 (Virginia). 

Elisabeth Jastrow, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Ph.D., 1916 (Heidelberg, Germany). 

Annie Beam FUnderburk, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of French. 

B.A., 1916 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1934 (North Carolina). 

Mary Harrell, B.A., B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor in Commercial 
Department. 

B.A., 1917 (Queens) ; B.S., 1938 (George Peabody) ; M.A., 1942 (New York Uni- 
versity) . 

Guita Marble, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., 1930, M.A., 1932, Ph.D., 1935 (Kansas). 

"Lawrence S. Ritchie, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biol- 
ogy. 

B.A., 1928 (Grand Island) ; M.A., 1930, Ph.D., 1936 (Northwestern). 

Mathdlde Hardaway, B.B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business 
Education. 

B.B.A., 1930 (Texas) ; M.B.A., 1938 (Chicago). 

Rowena Wellman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business 
Education. 

B.A., 1919 (Iowa) ; M.A., 1928, Ph.D., 1937 (Columbia). 

Vhiginia Gangstad, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.A., 1934, M.A., 1935, Ph.D., 1938 (Illinois). 

Virgil E. Lindsey, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Economies. 

B.A., 1926 (Missouri Wesleyan) ; M.A., 1936 (Iowa). 



M On leave of absence, 1948-1949. 



16 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Gaynell Callaway Spivey, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
English. 

B.A., 1917 (Greensboro) ; M.A., 1925, Ph.D., 1928 (North Carolina). 

Jeanette R. Potter,, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

B.A., 1929 (Iowa State Teachers) ; M.S., 1939 (Wisconsin). 

Richard Bardolph, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History, 

B.A., 1940, M.A., 1941. Ph.D., 1944 (Illinois). 

Hilda T. Harpster, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.A., 1927 (Sweet Briar); M.A., 1929, Ph.D., 1936 (Michigan). 

Eugenia McIver Hunter, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Education. 

B.A., 1926 (Goucher) ; M.A., 1939 (Columbia) ; Ph.D., 1947 (Ohio State University), 

George W. Dickieson, B.Mus., M.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., 1934 (Salem) ; M.Mus.. 1940 (Cincinnati Conservatory). 

Marjorie Leonard, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

B.S., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1945 
(North Carolina). 

Kathryn McA. England, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., 1933 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College) ; M.A., 1937 (Columbia). 

Marion M. Watson, B.A., M.A. in Ed., Assistant Professor Education. 

B.A., 1932 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A. in Ed., 
1945 (North Carolina) ; (Columbia). 

Ellen Griffin, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., 1940 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1943 
(North Carolina). 

Cathryne Kehoe, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1923 (William and Mary) ; M.S., 1944 (North Carolina). 

Charlotte W. Dawley, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biol- 
ogy. 

B.A., 1924 (Carleton College) ; M.S., 1927 (Washington University) ; Ph.D., 1944 
(Minnesota). 

Noma Hardin, B.A., B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.A., 1929 (Baylor) ; B.S., 1942, M.A., 1942 (Texas State College for Women). 

Helen Kirk Surratt, B.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1936 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; (University 
of Washington). 

Elizabeth Cowling, B.A., M.A., M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.A., 1933 (Carleton) ; M.A., 1935 (Columbia) ; M.M., 1940 (Northwestern). 

Anne Louise Lewis, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

B.A., 1940 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College) ; M.S., 1941, Ph.D., 1943 (Chicago). 

Virginia G. Moomaw, B.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., 1935 (Nebraska) ; (Wisconsin) ; (Bennington) ; (Mills) ; (New York Studios 
of Martha Graham and Charles Weidman). 



Faculty 17 

Mary Katharina Williams, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.S., 1928, M.A., 1929 (Wisconsin) ; (New York University) ; (Austrian State 
Art School, Hertha Buchner Ceramics, Vienna). 

Elizabeth Hathaway, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

B.S., 1925 (Woman's College of the University of the University of North Caro- 
lina) ; M.A., 1946 (Columbia). 

John Earl Courtney, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.S., 1932 (N. E. Missouri State Teachers) ; M.A., 1938 (Colorado State College 
of Education). 

Ruth Dalrymple, B.S., M.N., Assistant Professor of Health. 

B.S., 1937 (Muskingum) ; M.N., 1940 (Western Reserve). 

Margaret Greene, B.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., 1940 (Appalachian State Teachers College). 

Patsy Montague, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1940 (East Carolina Teachers College) ; M.A., 1946 (Columbia). 

Anne Shamburger, Assistant Professor of Health. 

(Guilford) ; (John Hopkins) ; (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). 

Margaret DeVinny, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor in Commercial 
Department. 

B.S., 1927 (Kansas State) ; M.S., 1940 (Tennessee). 

Evelyn Fowler, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Business Education. 

B.A., 1933 (Catawba) ; M.S., 1944 (North Carolina). 

Maxine Garner, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

B.A., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1946 
(Union Theological Seminary, Columbia). 

Emily Gentry Ashley, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor in Commer- 
cial Department. 

B.S., 1934 (Winthrop) ; M.A., 1941 (Columbia). 

Ione H. Grogan, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., 1926 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1928 (Columbia). 

Louise Lowe, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1931 (Georgia State College for Women) ; M.S., 1941 (Georgia). 

Phillip Morgan, B.M., Assistant Professor of Piano. 

B.M., 1937 (Tulsa) ; (Eastman School of Music) ; (Pupil of Guy Maier). 

Jessie Peden, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., 1928 (Winthrop) ; M.A., 1946 (North Carolina). 

Elliott Weisgarber, B.M., M.M., Assistant Professor in Music. 

B.M., 1942, M.M., 1943 (Eastman School of Music). 

V. Louise Whitlock, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Business Edu- 
cation. 

B.S., 1934 (Oregon State) ; M.S., 1940 (Tennessee). 

Wayne Bowman, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., 1937 (Elon) ; M.A., 1940, M.A., 1947 (North Carolina). 



18 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

William N. Felt, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

B.A., 1926 (Clark) ; M.A., 1931 (Middlebury). 

Duane P. Kline, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.S., 1941 (State Teachers, Indiana, Pa.) ; M.A., 1945 (Carnegie Institute of 
Technology). 

Emma McCloy Layman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
- Psychology. 

B.A., 1930 (Oberlin) ; M.A., 1931 (New York); Ph.D., 1937 (Iowa). 

Hollis J. Rogers B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.S., 1933 (Murray State College, Kentucky) ; M.S., 1941 (Kentucky). 

Gene Shelden, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.A., 1933 (Wichita) ; M.S., 1941 (Kansas). 

Claire Henley Atkisson, B.M., Assistant Professor in Music. 

B.M., 1916 (North Carolina College for Women) ; (Karl Bondheim). 

William Robert Barrett, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
German. 

B.A., 1939 (The Citadel) ; M.A., 1940 (Duke) ; Ph.D., 1948 (North Carolina). 

Alma Browning, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S., 1927, M.A., 1928 (George Peabody). 

Rita Anne Burdett, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

B.S., 1934 (New Jersey State Teachers College, Trenton) ; M.A., 1941 (New York). 

Ruth Clements, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health. 

B.A., 1935 (Denver) ; M.A., 1938 (Northwestern). 

Evelyn M. Cox, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., 1939; M.S., 1940 (Syracuse). 

C. Franklin Eicher, B.A., B.D., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor af 
Psychology. 

B.A., 1924 (Ohio State) ; B.D., 1929 (Meadville Theological School) ; M.A., 1929 
(Chicago) ; Ph.D., 1942 (Duke). 

Robert G. Hocker, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., 1941 ; M.A., 1946 (Pennsylvania). 

John A. Hornaday, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., 1945, M.A., 1948 (Duke). 

Lenore R. O'Boyle, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., 1943 (Bryn Mawr) ; M.A., 1944 (Yale) ; Ph.D., 1949 (Radcliffe). 

Lettie Hamlett Rogers, B.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., 1940 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Jean Marie Schneck, B.M., Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., 1945 (Oberlin Conservatory of Music). 

Lila Peck Walker, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., 1942 (Agnes Scott) ; M.A., 1944 (North Carolina). 



Faculty 19 

Alice B. Zimmerman, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., 1921 (Indiana State Normal, Eastern Division, Muncie) ; M.A., 1923 
(Columbia). 

Herbert W. Park, Instructor in Physical Education. 

(Springfield College) ; (Columbia). 

Kathleen S. Painter, B.A., Instructor in English. 

B.A., 1924 (Tennessee). 

Susan Barksdale, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Art. 

B.A., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1940 
(Columbia). 

Mary Alford Hunter, B.A., Instructor in Education. 

B.A., 1936 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Alice J. Ryan, B.A., Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.A., 1937 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; (Mount 
Holyoke) . 

Charlotte Anne Beaman, B.S., M.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 

B.S., 1942, M.S., 1945 (Tennessee). 

Frances A. Bleick, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., 1945 (Nebraska). 

Edith Huffman, B.A., Instructor in Education. 

B.A., 1934 (Lenoir Rhyne). 

Frances D. Lael, B.S., Instructor in Education. 

B.S., 1943 (Lenoir Rhyne) 

Martha Pearl Moore, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.A., 1939 (Florida State College for Women) ; M.A., 1945 (New York Uni- 
versity) . 

Myrtle Soles, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Latin. 

B.A., 1945 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1948 
(University of Michigan). 

Sanchia Thayer, B.A., M.A., Instructor in English. 

B.A., 1942 (Smith) ; M.A., 1943 (Radcliffe). 

Josefina Escajeda, B.A., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

B.A., 1936 (University of Texas). 

Inga Borgstrom Morgan, B.M., M.M., Instructor in Music. 

B.M., 1940, M.M., 1944 (Eastman School of Music). 

Eleanor V. Wolfe, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., 1945 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Mary Elizabeth Barwick, B.A., Instructor in English. 

B.A., 1944 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Virginia Austin, B.S., Instructor in Economics. 

B.S., 1943 (Georgia State College for Women). 

Hdlda Brady, B.A., Instructor in Art. 

B.A., 1940 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Elsie Jane Cox, R.N., R.T., Instructor in Physics. 

(Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; R.N., 1928 (Park View 
Hospital, Rocky Mount, N. C.) ; Diploma, 1941 (Hospital Division, Duke Uni- 
versity) . 



20 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Edward C. Fitzpatrick, Jr., B.A., Instructor in English. 

B.A., 1936 (Iowa). 

Mary Kathleen Huse, B.A., Instructor in Psychology. 

B.A., 1943 (North Carolina). 

Mackie Langham Jarrell, B.A., M.A., Instructor in English. 

B.A., 1934, M.A., 1935 (Texas). 

Frank W. Szabo, B.S., Instructor in Education. 

B.S., 1946 (Miami University). 

Marvelle Weaver, B.S., Instructor in Commercial Department. 

B.S., 1942 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Laura G. Anderton, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Biology. 

B.A., 1940 (Wellesley) ; M.S., 1948 (Brown). 

Rosemary Cleveland, B.A., Instructor in Education. 

B.A., 1947 (North Carolina). 

Anne Marie Dickinson, B.A., Instructor in Spanish. 

B.A., 1946 (North Carolina). 

Marian Falloon, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., 1948 (Nebraska). 

Ligia Hunt, B.A., Instructor in Romance Languages. 

B.A., 1941 (University of Puerto Rico). 

Frances A. McBane, B.S.M., Instructor in Music. 

B.S.M., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Alexander H. McLeod, Jr., B.A., M.A., Instructor in History. 

B.A., 1936, M.A., 1939 (North Carolina). 

Mary Etta Morgan, B.A., Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.A., 1934 (Meredith). 

Walter C. Neale, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Economics. 

B.A., 1947 (Princeton) ; M.A., 1948 (Columbia). 

Ida J. Nolte, B.Sc, M.B.A., Instructor in Business Education. 

B.Sc, 1943 (Cincinnati) ; M.B.A., 1946 (Chicago). 

Walter K. Roberts, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

B.S., 1948 (East Tennessee State College) ; M.A., 1948 (George Peabody). 

Anne W. Schuler, B.A., Instructor in Physics. 

B.A., 1943 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College). 

Wilma La Verne Sears, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Sara E. Smith, B.S. in Ed., M.A., Instructor in Sociology. 

B.S. in Ed., 1939 (State Teachers College, Indiana, Pa.) ; M.A., 1947 (North 
Carolina). 

Jane M. Wharton, B.S.M., Instructor in Music. 

B.S.M., 1945 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; Diploma, 
1948 (Juilliard School of Music). 

Mary Hickson Whatley, B.S., Instructor in Sociology. 

B.S., 1930 (Alabama). 



Faculty 21 

ACADEMIC ASSISTANTS 

Caroline Andrews, B.A., Assistant in Chemistry. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Audrey Louise Davis, B.A., Assistant in Psychology. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Marietta Hamrick, B.A., Assistant in Biology. 

B.A., 1946 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Rita I. Hunter, B.A., Assistant in Chemistry. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Doris Higgins Lauten, B.A., Assistant in Psychology. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Elizabeth M. Osborne, B.A., Assistant in Biology. 

B.A., 1948 .(Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Nancy M. Romefelt, B.A., Assistant in Chemistry. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Annabelle Thomas, B.A., Assistant in Biology. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Caroline Twiggs, Assistant in Biology. 
Esther A. Wooten, Assistant in Biology. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Mary Angelyn Giles, B.S., Business Education. 
Mozelle Keller, B.S., Home Economics. 
Gwendolyn Krahnke, B.A., Home Economics. 
Laura Louise Lucas, B.S., Home Economics. 
Sarah Josephine Sherrill, B.S., Home Economics. 
E. Allene Wall, B.S., Home Economics. 

THE LIBRARY 

Charles M. Adams, B.A., B.S., M.A., Librarian, Professor. 

B.A., 1931 (Amherst) ; B.S., 1933, M.A., 1942 (Columbia). 

Elizabeth Sampson, B.S., Head of the Catalogue Department. 

B.S., 1918 (Simmons). 

Sue Vernon Williams, B.S., M.A., Head of the Reference Department. 

B.S., 1919, M.A., 1922 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College) ; Certificate, 1922 
(Carnegie Library School, Atlanta). 

MARJORIE Hood, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Head of the Circulation Department. 

B.A., 1926 (North Carolina College for Women) ; B.A. in L.S., 1936 (Emory). 

Virginia Trumper, Serials Librarian. 

(Denison) ; (Louisville Public Library Training Class). 

Mary Robert Seawell, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Order Librarian. 

B.A., 1927 (Meredith) ; B.A. in L.S., 1938 (North Carolina). 



22 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Minnie Middleton Hussey, B.A., Readers 9 Adviser. 

B.A., 1911 (Meredith) ; B.A., 1930 (North Carolina College for Women). 

Vivian Moose, B.A., B.S., in L.S., Assistant Cataloguer. 

B.A., 1929 (Lenoir Rhyne) ; B.S. in L.S., 1940 (North Carolina). 

Margaret Mason, B.A., B.S., Reserve Librarian. 

B.A., 1941 (Blue Mountain) ; B.A., 1942 (George Peabody). 

Lois Smathers Neal, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Reference Assistant and In- 
structor in Library Use. 

B.A., 1933 (Duke) ; B.A. in L.S., 1939 (North Carolina). 

Elizabeth Holder, B.A., Assistant Circulation Librarian. 

B.A., 1935 (Salem). 

u Bethiah Weisgarber, B.M. Serials Department Assistant. 

B.M., 1943 (University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music). 

Beverly Bell, B.A., Catalogue Department Assistant. 

B.A., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

COUNSELORS IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

Laura G. Anderton, B.A., M.S., Counselor. 

B.A., 1940 (Wellesley) ; M.S., 1948 (Brown). 

Gozeal Hunt Andrews, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1912 (Randolph-Macon Woman's College). 

Ann Laura Bodie, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1947 (Syracuse). 

Patricia E. Carruthers, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1946 (Denison University). 

Anne Fulton Carter, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1921 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1947 (Columbia). 

Dorothy Lee Clement, B.S.M., M.M., Counselor. 

B.S.M., 1923 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.M., 1939 (Northwestern). 

Lillian Cunningham, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1925 (Converse). 

Anne Marie Dickinson, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1946 (North Carolina). 

Maxine Garner, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1946 
(Union Theological Seminary, Columbia). 

Alice Irene Glass, Counselor. 

(Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

IONE H. GROGAN, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1926 (North Carolina College for Women) ; M.A., 1928 (Columbia). 

Olive S. Horton, B.Ed., M.S., Counselor. 

B.Ed., 1942 (Illinois State Normal University) ; M.S., 1946 (Syracuse). 



"Part time. 



Faculty 23 

Ethel Haskin Hunter, Counselor. 

Diploma, 1906 (Howard-Payne). 

Evelyn Martin, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1930 (Georgia State College for Women). 

Elvira L. Prondecki, B.A., Counselor. 

B.A., 1937 (Smith). 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Helen Burns, B.A., M.A., Freshman Class Chairman, Associate Pro- 
fessor, 

B.A., 1925 (Iowa) ; M.A., 1937 (Columbia). 

Ethel V. Butler, B.A., Manager of the Book Store. 

B.A., 1929 (North Carolina College for Women). 

Edna A. Forney, B.A., Assistant Treasurer. 

Diploma, 1908, B.A., 1929 (North Carolina College for Women). 

Maxine Garner, B.A., M.A., Director of Religious Activities, Counselor. 
Assistant Professor. 

B.A., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1946 
(Union Theological Seminary, Columbia). 

Robert L. Garrard, B.A., M.S., B.S. in Medicine, M.D., Psychiatrist. 

B.A., M.S., 1928 (Alabama) ; B.S. in Medicine 1930 (Alabama) ; M.D., 1932 
(Harvard Medical School). 

Carey F. Hester, B.A., B.S., in L.S., Librarian in Curry School, Depart- 
ment of Education. 

B.A., 1944 (Union University), B.S. in L.S., 1945 (George Peabody) 

Betty Brown Jester, B.A., Alumnae Secretary. 

B.A., 1931 (North Carolina College for Women). 

Mildred P. Newton, B.A., Secretary of Admissions. 

B.A., 1924 (Goucher). 

Charles Wiley Phillips, B.A., M.A., Director of Public Relations, 
Professor. 

B.A., 1921 (North Carolina), M.A., 1927 (Columbia). 

J.M. Sink, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Cora Jane Staton, R.N., Nurse. 

Mary Alice Tennent, B.A., Assistant Registrar. 

B.A., 1920 (North Carolina College for Women). 

Albert A. Wilkinson, B.A., Director of News Bureau. 

B.A-, 1927 (Duke). 

SECRETARIES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS 

May Lattimore Adams, Office of the Dean of Women. 
u Hallie Anthony, Department of Public Relations. 



"Retired January 1, 1949. 



24 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Louise Atkins, B.S., Office of the Department of Education. 

B.S., 1946 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Louise Harlow Baity, B.S., Manager, Soda Shop. 

B.S., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Annie Ben Beale, B.A., Office of Assistant Controller. 

B.A., 1948 (North Carolina). 

Elizabeth Booker, B.S., Office of the Class Chairmen. 

B.S., 1941 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Olena Swain Bunn, B.A., M.A., Assistant, Office of the Registrar. 

B.A., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1947 
(North Carolina). 

Jean Church, B.A., M.A., Curator, Art Department. 

B.A., 1941 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina) ; M.A., 1944 
(State University of Iowa). 

Dorothy Covington, Office of Assistant Controller. 

(Washington School for Secretaries, Washington, D. C). 

M. Louise Davis, Secretary, News Bureau. 

(One Year Commercial, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Evon Welch Dean, Office of the Alumnae Secretary. 
Doris DeVeny, Accompanist, Physical Education. 
Sarah Clark Dobbins, Department of Public Relations. 

(One Year Commercial, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Mary Hazel Fitch, Pay Roll Clerk, Accounting Department. 

(One Year Commercial, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Miriam Fortner, B.A., Admissions Office. 

B.A., 1948 (Pennsylvania State College). 

^Mary Lois Gordon, B.S., Department of Public Relations. 

B.S., 1943 (Woman's Colege of the University of North Carolina). 

Edna Earle Gresham, Office of the Department of Education. 
Charlotte Gulliver, A.A., Postmistress. 

A.A., 1938 (Centenary Junior College). 

Mary Randolph Gyles, Office of the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Edith Harwood, B.L., Office of the Registrar. 

B.L., 1920 (Berea). 

Emily R. Hasty, Office of the Department of Home Economics. 
Kathleen Pettit Hawkins, Secretary of Loans. 
Margaret Sparger Honbarrier, B.S., Office of the Library. 

B.S., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 



12 Resigned November 1, 1948. 



Faculty 25 

Katherine Chauncey Huffines, Department of Public Relations. 

(One Year Commercial, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Annie H. Hughes, Office of the College Physician. 

Virginia Elizabeth Jackson, B.S.M., Department of Public Relations. 

B.S.M., 1929 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Josephine Tucker Jenkins, B.A., Cashier, Book Store. 

B.A., 1926 (Mississippi State College for Women). 

Ella Mae Livingston, B.S., Bookkeeper, Home Economics Cafeteria. 

B.S., 1945 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Mary T. McGeady, B.A., Office of the Department of Business Educa- 
tion. 

B.A., 1948 (Immaculata College). 

Princie A. Maphet, B.A., M.S., Assistant to the Registrar. 

B.A., 1937 (Flora Macdonald) ; M.S., 1946 (North Carolina). 

Sarah Jocelyn Mason, B.A., Secretary, Department of Education. 

B.A., 1944 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Betty Moore, B.S., Assistant Dietitian. 

B.S., 1946 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Helen Moxley, B.S., M.A., Assistant Director of Residence. 

B.S., 1938 (Battle Creek College) ; M.A., 1942 (Columbia). 

Sallie Tucker Mumford, B.A., Laboratory Technician,, Infirmary. 

B.A., 1922 (North Carolina College for Women). 

Mary Edith Newton, Manager of the Home Economics Cafeteria. 

Helen Pickard, Office of the Assistant Controller. 

Virginia Mae Powell, B.S., Assistant Director of the Dining Halls. 

B.S., 1939 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Theda Pritchett, Office of the Dietitian. 

Frances W. Rankin, B.A., Office of the Department of Home Ec- 
onomics. 

B.A., (Meredith). 

Eloise Taylor Robinson, B.S., Bookkeeper in the Book Store. 

B.S., 1936 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Margaret Coley Sancton, Office of the Auditor. 
Louise Scott, Supervisor, Switchboard. 
Ruthe Shafer, B.A., Office of the Treasurer. 

B.A., 1931 (North Carolina College for Women). 

BETTE Michels Sherrill, B.M.E., Secretary to the Dean, School of 
Music. 

B.M.E., 1944 (Northwestern). 



26 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Mary Lane Siler, B.S., Assistant Dietitian. 

B.S., 1943 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Allene Parks Smallwood, B.S., Admissions Office. 

B.S., 1948 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

"Jean Morgan Sullivan, B.S., Secretary, Office of Department of Edu- 
cation. 

B.S., 1943 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

Alma Coley Thompson, Office of the Auditor. 

Mary Graves Turbiville, Assistant Nurse, Infirmary. 

Louise Turner, B.S., Office of the Chancellor. 

B.S., 1946 (Woman's College of the University of North Carolina). 

R. Jeanette Wade, Assistant Manager, Book Store. 
Edna R. Williams, R.N., Nurse, Infirmary. 



^Resigned October 20, 1948. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



The Faculty Council. The Faculty Council, meetings of which are 
presided over by the Chancellor, is the legislative body of the College. 
It is composed of the Chief Administrative Officers, Professors, Associ- 
ate Professors, and Assistant Professors. The time for regular meet- 
ing is the evening of the third Monday of each month. 

Academic and Personnel. Miss Taylor (Chairman) ; Miss Gangstad, 
Chairman of Class of 1949; Miss Draper, Chairman of Class of 1950; 
Miss Davis, Chairman of Class of 1951; Miss Burns, Chairman of 
Freshman Class; Dr. Collings; Miss Horton, representative of student 
legislature; Mr. Shaftesbury, Mrs. Spivey. 

Admissions. Mr. Painter (Chairman), Miss Newton, Miss Burns, 
Mr. Altvater. 

Advanced Standing. Mr. Coy T. Phillips (Chairman), Miss Row- 
ley, Miss Tennent. 

Advisers. Members of the Faculty, under the guidance of the Class 
Chairmen, serve as advisers for all freshmen and sophomores. 

Advisory. Mr. Jackson (Chairman), ex officio; Miss Taylor, ex of- 
ficio; Mr. Lockhart, ex officio; Mr. Ivy, Miss Martus, Mr. Pfaff, Mr. 
Littlejohn, Miss Barton, Miss Shaver. 

Arrival op Students. Mr. Bardolph (Chairman), Mr. Dickieson, 
Mr. Courtney, Mr. Weisgarber, Mr. Smith, Mr. Kline, Mr. Rogers, Mr. 
Fitzpatrick. 

Arts Forum. Mr. Friedlaender (Chairman), Mr. Adams, Mr. Alt- 
vater, Miss Grogan, Mr. Hurley, Mr. Ivy, Miss Martus, Miss Moomaw, 
Miss Prondecki, Miss Reardon, Miss Taylor, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Thomp- 
son, Miss Thrush, Mr. Weisgarber, Miss England. 

Auditorium. Mr. Lockhart (Chairman), Mr. Rogers (Vice-Chair- 
man), Mr. Kline (Vice-Chairman), Mr. Coy T. Phillips, Mr. Smith, 
Mr. Thiel, Mr. Bardolph, Mr. Courtney, Mr. Weisgarber, Mr. Hocker, 
Mr. McLeod, Mr. Neale. 

Building. Miss Taylor, Mr. Lockhart, Mr. Hall, Miss Playfoot. 
Calendar of College Events. Dr. Collings (Chairman), Mr. Jerni- 
gan, Miss Minor, Miss Grogan. 

Catalogue. Mr. Wilson (Chairman pro tern), Miss Tennent, Mrs. 
Spivey. 



27 



28 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Chapel. Mr. Charles W. Phillips, Miss Griffin, Miss Hege, Mr. 
Thompson, Miss Taylor, Miss Garner, Miss England. 

Class Chairmen. Freshman, Miss Burns; Sophomore, Miss Davis, 
Junior, Miss Draper; Senior, Miss Gangstad. 

Concert. Mr. Altvater (Chairman), Mr. Thompson, Miss Coldwell, 
Mr. Friedlaender. 

Curriculum. Mr. Hurley (Chairman), Mr. Ivy, Miss Ingraham, 
Mr. Little John, Miss Schaeffer, Mr. Jernigan, Mr. Keister, Mr. Cooke, 
Mr. Coy T. Phillips, Mr. Barrett, Miss Dalrymple, Miss Largent, Mrs. 
Street, Miss Barton, Miss Martus, Miss Reardon, Mrs. Layman, Mr. 
Hooke, Miss Shivers, Miss Minor, Miss Harrell. 

Dramatics Activities Board of Directors. Miss Grogan (Chair- 
man), Mr. Taylor, Mr. Fitzpatrick, Mr. Bowman, Mr. Courtney, Miss 
Hathaway, Miss Hege, Miss Martus, Mr. Adams, Mr. Hurley, Miss 
Cowling, Miss England, Miss Taylor. 

Graduate Study. Mr. McNutt (Chairman), Miss Edwards, Mr. 
Keister, Miss Hunter, Mr. Littlejohn. 

Harriet Elliott Social Science Forum. Mr. Pfaff (Chairman), 
Mr. Keister, Miss Grogan, Mr. Johns, Mr. Johnson, Miss Duffy, Mr. 
Bardolph, Miss Shivers, Miss Cooke, Miss Mossman, Miss Arundel. 

HONORS. Mr. Bridgers (Chairman), Miss Gangstad, Mrs. Street. 

HONORS WORK. Miss Barton (Chairman), Miss Schaeffer, Miss 
Martus, Mr. Bardolph, Miss Farinholt, Mr. Bridgers, Miss Hardin. 

Lectures. Mr. Pfaff (Chairman), Miss Ingraham, Miss Taylor, Mr. 
Jernigan, Mr. Adams. 

Library. Miss Ingraham (Chairman), Mr. Pfaff, Mr. Keister, Miss 
Edwards, Mr. McNutt, Miss Summerell, Mr. Adams (Secretary). 

Loan. Mrs. Funderburk (Chairman), Mr. Lockhart, Mr. Charles W. 
Phillips, Mrs. Hawkins. 

Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Barrow (Chairman), Miss Petty, 
Miss Reardon, Miss Watkins. 

Motion Picture. Miss Reardon (Chairman), Miss Barrow, Mr. 
Smith. 

Points. Mrs. Funderburk, Miss Thayer. 

Proficiency Examinations. Mr. Thiel (Chairman), Miss Spruill, 
Miss Harris, and one member of the department giving the exami- 
nation. 



Standing Committees op the Faculty 29 

Radio. Mrs. Rosa (Chairman), Mr. Fitzpatrick, Miss Harpster, 
Miss Hege, Mr. Vaughan, Mr. Adams, Miss Cowling, Miss Davis. 

Reviewing. Mr. Painter (Chairman), Mr. Jernigan, Miss Draper, 
Miss Garner, Miss England. 

Rooms and Offices. Mr. Barney (Chairman), Mr. Vaughan, Mr. 
Hall, Miss Gullander, Miss Edwards, Miss Martus, Mr. Altvater, Mr. 
Lockhart. 

Social. Miss Petty (Chairman) Miss Watkins (Vice-Chairman), 
Miss Beaman, Miss Clement, Miss Dawley, Miss Largent, Miss Farin- 
holt, Miss Soles. 

Student Legislature Representatives. Miss Shivers, Miss Horton, 
Miss Cunningham. 

Weil Fellowship. Mr. Johns (Chairman), Miss Taylor, Miss Harp- 
ster. 

Winfield Endowment. Miss Summer ell, Miss LaRochelle, Mr. 
Lockhart. 



II. THE COLLEGE 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, the first 
state supported institution for the higher education of women in North 
Carolina, was established by legislative enactment on February 18, 
1891, and opened on October 5, 1892. The City of Greensboro, situated 
near the geographical center of the state, was selected for the location 
of the new institution. Its citizens voted bonds to the sum of $30,000 
for the erection of the first buildings, and the original ten-acre site 
was given by R. S. Pullen and R. T. Gray, of Raleigh. 

The College, for many years (1896-1919) the State Normal and In- 
dustrial College, and later (1919-1932) the North Carolina College for 
Women, came into being as a direct result of a crusade made by 
Charles Duncan Mclver in behalf of the education of women. Other pio- 
neers in public school education — notably, Charles B. Aycock, Edwin A. 
Alderman, and James Y. Joyner — came to Dr. Mdver's assistance; but 
to him more than to any other individual the College owes its founda- 
tion. He became its first president and served it until his death in 
1906. In that year Dr. Julius I. Foust became president, and upon the 
foundation laid by Dr. Mclver he and his co-workers developed a strong 
liberal arts college. 

The College became a part of the University of North Carolina in 
1931, when the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act to 
consolidate the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the State 
College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh, and the North 
Carolina College for Women. By the provisions of this act, the North 
Carolina College for Women, on July 1, 1932, became the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina. At. that time, also, the 
Board of Trustees chosen by the General Assembly assumed control of 
the new university, and a few months later elected Dr. Frank Porter 
Graham its president. In 1934 Dr. Foust retired from active service 
and was made President Emeritus of the Woman's College. At the 
same time Dr. Walter Clinton Jackson, who had long served the Col- 
lege as teacher and vice-president, was elected head of the institution 
with the title of Dean of Administration. By act of the Board of Trus- 
tees in 1945, the title of the head of the institution was changed to 
Chancellor. 

Although originally the main purpose of the Woman's College was 
to provide instruction for those expecting to enter the public school 
system of the state, it has developed into a distinguished liberal arts 
college. The College now offers liberal courses in the arts and sciences 
and in music, and at the same time it continues to give teacher train- 
ing and instruction in commercial branches, in home economics, and in 
other subjects, the mastery of which will enable women to become self- 

30 



Buildings and Grounds 31 

supporting. From a student body of 223 and a faculty of 15 the Col- 
lege has grown into one of the largest colleges for women in the coun- 
try, with a plant valued at approximately $7,500,000; a faculty of more 
than 280; and a student body of over 2100. 

The Woman's College is a member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Association of American Colleges, 
the American Council on Education, the Southern Association of Col- 
leges for Women, the North Carolina College Conference; it is on the 
approved list of the Association of American Universities. Its gradu- 
ates are eligible to membership in the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women. 

The College confers seven undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, Bachelor of Science in Music, 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in Busi- 
ness Education and Secretarial Administration, Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing, and Bachelor of Fine Arts. Certain curricula of the Gradu- 
ate School of the University are also offered at the Woman's College. 
These curricula are in the fields of Business Education and Secretarial 
Administration, Elementary Education, and Home Economics. The 
College is organized into the Liberal Arts College, the School of Music, 
and the School of Education. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina is a part 
of the public school system of the state. As a state institution it desires 
to be of the greatest possible service to the people of North Carolina, 
and its advantages are open to all on similar terms. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Since its establishment the College has constantly added to its mate- 
rial equipment. The campus now consists of more than one hundred 
acres of improved and wooded land on which there are fifty buildings. 
Apart from the residence halls, the following are the principal build- 
ings: the Administration Building (1892) — offices of Administration, 
classrooms, faculty offices; Students' Building (1901) — assembly hall, 
society halls and rooms, the book store, the post office; the Dining 
Rooms (1904, 1922, 1925, 1939)— four large halls (capacity 2,000) 
connected through a central serving room with kitchen and cold stor- 
age plant; the Library (1905, rebuilt in 1933 after a disastrous fire) ; 
Mclver Building (1908) — class and lecture rooms, laboratories, and 
offices; the Anna M. Gove Infirmary (1912) — fifty beds for students, 
offices for consultation, examinations, and dispensary treatment, for 
nurses' residence; the Hut (1918) — recreation and devotional gather- 
ings; the Home Management Houses (1921, 1941) — of the Department 
of Home Economics, furnished and equipped on moderate and low 
income levels respectively, laboratories for conducting the activities of 
a home; the Outdoor Gymnasium (1922) ; the Chancellor's Home (1923) 
— the residence of the family of the Chancellor; the Rosenthal Gym- 



32 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

nasium (1923) — a main gymnasium and two small gymnasia, various 
rooms for lecture and remedial purposes, offices, examination and rest 
rooms, a swimming pool, dressing and shower booths; the Music Build- 
ing (1924) — a recital hall, classrooms, offices, and practice rooms; 
Aycock Auditorium (1926) — the large auditorium (carpacity 3,000, 
reception rooms, cloak rooms, offices, an assembly room for the meet- 
ings of the Play-Likers, a large laboratory; Curry Building (1926) — 
the training school, with school and college classrooms, a large demon- 
stration room, an auditorium (capacity 500), and offices; the Home Eco- 
nomics Building (1927) — class and lecture rooms, laboratories, nursery 
school, cafeteria, offices; Alumnae House (1935) — for official alumnae 
and college functions, offices for the Alumnae Association, for student 
publications, for student government association; the Science Building 
(1939) — class lecture rooms and laboratories. 

LABORATORIES AND STUDIOS 

Art Studios — The Weatherspoon Art Gallery, in Mclver Building, 
provides suitable space for exhibitions of paintings, prints, sculpture, 
and other art forms. The North Carolina School Art Exhibition, the 
Student Exhibition, and the International Textile Exhibition are held 
here annually. The small adjacent gallery is used for the Senior Stu- 
dent Exhibitions and small loan exhibitions. From the various student 
exhibitions examples of work are selected each year to be added to 
the permanent collection of the Department of Art. The Art Refer- 
ence Room, adjacent to the Weatherspoon Art Gallery, houses the col- 
lection of reproductions of paintings, sculpture, architecture, etc.; the 
WPA collection of prints and watercolors; the collection of contempo- 
rary textiles and the art periodicals. This room is also used for small 
exhibitions. The collection presented by the Weatherspoon Gallery Asso- 
ciation, consisting of works by living Americans, was begun in 1942, 
and will be increasingly important as the collection grows. 

Biology Laboratories — The Department of Biology, housed in 
Science Building, has five suites of two laboratories each. There are 
special laboratories for botany, general biology, bacteriology, physi- 
ology, anatomy, and zoology. Each of the five suites includes a prepa- 
ration room, offices, and store rooms. Other equipment includes a con- 
stant temperature animal room, compound microscopes, microtomes, 
paraffin baths, incubator room, museum collections, models, charts and 
lantern slides. The College owns and operates a marine laboratory at 
Beaufort, North Carolina, where summer courses in marine zoology are 
given and where research projects may be carried on. 

Chemistry Laboratories — The Department of Chemistry, housed in 
Science Building, has well equipped laboratories and preparation rooms 
for the various branches of chemistry including general, analytical, 
organic, physical, food and biochemistry. Adjoining the analytical and 



Residence Halls 33 

physical chemistry laboratory is a specially constructed balance room, 
and adjoining the food and biochemistry laboratories are a smaller 
balance room and a dark room. There is a large storeroom, and three 
of the classrooms are equipped for lecture demonstrations. 

Physics Laboratories — The Department of Physics, housed in 
Science Building, has a large general laboratory and three smaller spe- 
cial purpose laboratories: one for mechanics, heat, and sound experi- 
ments; one for experiments in magnetism, electricity, and modern 
physics; and another for experiments in the field of light. Three lec- 
ture rooms are well equipped for demonstration lectures. In addition, 
there is one suite of rooms including a studio and four dark rooms for 
photography, and another suite for X-ray work. The Department of 
Physics has a great variety of experimental equipment including a 
Foucault pendulum available for use with a heliostat. 

Psychology Laboratories — The Department of Psychology has a 
laboratory for general psychology, equipped with modern apparatus. A 
mental testing laboratory includes an observation room with one-way 
vision equipment for demonstrations, and four small rooms for indi- 
vidual testing. Mental testing equipment includes most of the recog- 
nized tests available. The child psychology laboratory equipped with 
booths for individual interviews, audiometer, and other apparatus is 
located in the practice school in Curry Building. The department also 
has fully equipped reading, animal, and research laboratories. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

There are sixteen residence halls on the campus. In each hall is a 
counselor, to whom students may go for advice and who supervises social 
activities in accordance with regulations of the College. The rooms are 
comfortably furnished. Only single beds are used. North Spencer Hall 
and South Spencer Hall (1904, remodeled and modernized in 1938) — 
named for Mrs. Cornelia Phillips Spencer, one of North Carolina's 
most distinguished women, three hundred and sixteen students; Wom- 
an's Hall (1912) — dedicated by the General Assembly of North Caro- 
lina to the women of the Confederacy, fifty-six students; Kirkland Hall 
(1912) — named for Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first lady principal 
of the College, eighty -four students; Anna Howard Shaw (1920) — 
named for the great national woman suffragist, one hundred and four 
students; Gray Hall (1921) — named for Mr. Robert T. Gray, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of the College from 1900 to 1912, one 
hundred and twenty-two students; Bailey Hall (1922) — named for Mr. 
T. B. Bailey, a member of the Board of Trustees of the College from 
1902 to 1916, one hundred and twenty-two students; Cotten Hall (1922) 
— named for Mrs. Sally Southall Cotten, one hundred and twenty-two 
students; Hinshaw Hall (1922) — named for Colonel G. W. Hinshaw, a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the College from 1910 to 1918, 



34 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

one hundred and twenty-two students; Laura Coit Hall (1923) — named 
for Miss Laura Coit, late secretary of the College, one hundred and 
twenty-two students; Jamison Hall (1923) — named for Miss Minnie 
Jamison, one of the first students and long-time member of the faculty, 
one hundred and twenty-two students; Mary Foust Hall (1927) — 
named by the alumnae of the College in memory of the daughter of the 
late President Foust, one hundred and forty-six students; New Guil- 
ford Hall (1927)— a duplicate of Mary Foust Hall; Martha Winfield 
and Mina Weil Hall (1939)— named for Miss Martha Winfield, late 
professor of English at the College, and for Mrs. Mina Weil, benefac- 
tress of the College, two distinct but connected halls giving the appear- 
ance of one building, two hundred and ninety students; Mclver House, 
in use temporarily for ex-service women — nineteen students. 

THE LIBRARY 

The aim of the Library is to put before the student as rich a col- 
lection as its resources permit in every field of study in which courses 
are offered, and to provide guides and helps for the use of this material. 
Useful library aids are the student library handbook, Help Yourself, and 
Using the Library — A Faculty Handbook. In the Reference Room and 
in small class meetings in the Library's seminar room, there is an 
opportunity for students to receive individual and group guidance in 
the intelligent use of the book collection. The assistance given to stu- 
dents individually at the Reference desk and in class groups in the 
seminar is intended to be entirely suggestive as to procedure in search- 
ing for material, not as direct help in finding it. 

The Library has, for its size (128,978 volumes), an unusually well 
selected collection of general reference books, of specialized reference 
works in different fields, and of bibliographies and indexes to make its 
contents available. It adds annually nearly 5,000 volumes and some 600 
journals through purchase and gifts. In addition, it has a useful group 
of several thousand federal and state documents. Like most college 
libraries, it has a number of special collections. In recent years it has 
been made a depository for the music manuscripts of outstanding North 
Carolina composers. It attempts to maintain a complete record of col- 
lege history and faculty publications in the College Collection. It has 
special collections of pictures, children's literature, and textbooks. Three 
reading machines are available for the use of microfilm, and the 
Library has files of newspapers and some books now on film. In the 
Woman's Collection, it attempts to assemble material in all fields per- 
taining to women's interests for the use of the College community and 
of women throughout the state. The Library is making a special effort 
to collect all books by women associated with North Carolina. 

Although the Library exists to serve the ends of instruction, it has a 
primary responsibility to encourage general reading among students. 
Worthy of special note in the Woman's College Library is an exception- 



Student Health Service 35 

ally attractive Recreational Reading Room. Pleasantly furnished with 
comfortable chairs, sofas, small stands, and reading lamps, the room 
is designed for leisure-time and recreational reading. On the open 
shelves are the latest books, including fiction, drama, poetry, and biog- 
raphy. The Readers' Adviser in charge makes it her responsibility, in 
co-operation with the faculty, to help students discover new fields of 
reading interests in the stimulating modern books that constitute much 
of the changing collection in the Recreational Reading Room. 

It is a distinct advantage to the College from a library point of 
view, that it is located in a rich literary and cultural area. In addition 
to its own book collection, the Library is able in a short time, by means 
of inter-library loan service, to make available for faculty and graduate 
research the extensive book resources of the other units of the Con- 
solidated University, Duke University, and other libraries in the 
vicinity. 

When the College is in session, the Library is open on week days 
from 7:50 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and on Sundays from 2:30 p.m. to 6:00 
p.m. The Reserve Reading Room is closed on Sunday. During vaca- 
tions the Library is open Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 
p. m., 1 :30 to 4:00 p. m. and on Saturdays from 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon. 
The Library is closed on New Year's Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christ- 
mas Eve, and Christmas Day. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The student health service has as its aim the maintenance of good 
health among all members of the College community. To reach this 
objective, the work is necessarily of two types: first, preventive, and 
second, curative. Five types of preventive measures are taken. First, 
a complete medical examination is given to each student in both her 
freshman and her senior years. This examination includes a careful 
physical examination, laboratory tests, and a tuberculin test of each 
entering student with a chest X-ray of each positive reactor. The 
health service occasionally must recommend to the administration that 
a student physically unable to carry the full college load be asked to 
lighten her work or to withdraw from college until such time as her 
health shall improve. Second, follow-up examinations are given all 
students showing remediable defects, with a special effort to see that all 
such defects are corrected as soon as possible. Third, a careful check 
is made of all students engaged in self-help activities, extra academic 
work, athletic contests, or other strenuous extra-curricular duties. 
Fourth, vaccinations for smallpox are given each member of the Col- 
lege community every five years, in accordance with the ordinance of 
the city of Greensboro, and typhoid vaccination of all food handlers 
yearly. Influenza vaccine is offered to all students free of charge. Fifth, 
the physical conditions under which students work and live are care- 
fully supervised; proper diet, heating, lighting, ventilation, and sani- 



36 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

tation are all included among these conditions. The care of sick stu- 
dents, which is the second major duty of the health service, is centered 
in the Anna M. Gove Infirmary. Here, with a staff of two full-time 
physicians, a part-time psychiatrist, four graduate nurses, and a lab- 
oratory technician in attendance, all medical and minor surgical cases 
are given complete care. Major surgical cases must be referred to a 
hospital and surgeon not directly connected with the College. 

All resident students too ill to attend their college duties are admitted 
to the Infirmary for care, and excuses are issued upon their recovery 
and readmission to classes. Town students ill at home must bring to the 
College physician a note either from their parents or the attending 
physician within seventy-two hours of their return to school. Excuses 
are then issued by the medical staff in accordance with the rules laid 
down by the faculty council. Students should report promptly to the 
Infirmary in cases of illness of any kind. Prompt attention to minor 
conditions prevents the development of major ill health. In order to 
care for all cases promptly, the students' health service holds office 
hours as follows: 

DOCTORS 

8:30 A.M. to 12:30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 

2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

Afternoons by appointment. Emergency at any time. 

NURSES 

7:45 A.M. to 12:30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 

2:00 P.M. to 4:30 p.m. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

6:45 P.M. to 8:00 p.m. daily. 

9:00 A.M. to 10:00 a.m. Sunday. 

THE COMMUNITY 
Government 

The faculty and the students have integrated their ideas in the con- 
situation governing the College. The law-making authority resides in a 
representative body from the student group and the faculty. All stu- 
dent officers are chosen democratically. The student organization works 
in close co-operation with the Dean of Women and the counselors who 
have charge of the residence halls. 

There are three divisions of the student government machinery: the 
Judicial Board, the Legislature, and the House Organizations, serving 
in their various capacities. It is understood that to the faculty and the 
executive officers is reserved the handling of such matters as affect 
academic questions, matters relating to the health of the College com- 
munity, the control of property, and of special cases of discipline which 
are outside student jurisdiction. 



The Community 37 

Religion 

Voluntary Organizations. Though the College is non-Sectarian, 
the students are surrounded by religious influences. In addition to the 
Young Women's Christian Association, there are organized church 
groups with which students identify themselves for a continuing source 
of strength and place of service. Participation in this group work is 
invaluable training for religious leadership. Five churches — Methodist, 
Episcopalian, Baptist, Lutheran, and Presbyterian — maintain student 
secretaries who live near the College and work through student cen- 
ters and churches adjacent to the campus. 

The Inter-Faith Council is composed of student representatives of 
the church groups and of the Y. W. C. A., the five church secretaries, 
and faculty representatives or Greensboro ministers who are members 
of groups that have no student worker. The Council promotes under- 
standing of the common puposes of all religious organizations and unites 
all in joint activities. Members are working with the whole College 
on the fund for a chapel, a building in which students of all faiths 
will be at home. Students are encouraged both by the College and the 
churches to attend regularly the church of their choice. 

Director. The College employs a full-time Director of Religious 
Activities. It is her duty to co-ordinate all the religious organizations 
and activities and to advise students about their personal problems. 

University Sermons, inaugurated in 1934, are given by eminent 
leaders of different faiths. Each of the four classes sponsors one of 
these services on a Sunday morning during the year. The visiting 
speaker spends three days as guest of the College and addresses the 
student body at chapel exercises on Tuesday. In the College dining halls, 
in classes, and in discussions in residence hall parlors, students be- 
come acquainted with these religious thinkers. 

Chapel. Chapel exercises are held in Aycock Auditorium on Tues- 
days. Attendance is required. The exercises are often of a devotional 
nature, with the vested choir of one hundred and thirty-five students 
taking part. 

Social Life 

The social life of the College centers around the residence hall units, 
the four societies, and various clubs and class organizations. Picnics, 
week-end camping trips, teas, formal and informal dances help create 
a normal social atmosphere. Through certain of the clubs and through 
the advisory system, members of the faculty are able to establish social 
contacts with the students. Altogether there are many opportunities 
within the College community for a wholesome social life. 



38 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The Gymnasium, the Hut, and the Students' Building are available 
for formal and informal social contacts. 

SPORTS 

The athletic fields include twelve tennis courts; soccer, hockey, and 
baseball fields; a three-hole practice golf course; an archery range; 
and play space for minor team games and individual sports. The Rec- 
reation Association Camp, six miles from the city, is open to members 
of the Association for week-end camping groups. 

The Outdoor Gymnasium is equipped for basketball, volleyball, bad- 
minton, softball, etc. The Rosenthal Gymnasium contains the swim- 
ming pool, with modern equipment for heating and purification of the 
water; also 148 dressing rooms with adjoining showers, and one large 
gymnasium floor and three smaller ones. The indoor archery range, 
dance studio, badminton courts, etc., give ample opportunity for recre- 
ational activities and for the acquisition of recreational skill of lasting 
value. A lake on the grounds provides for boating. An amphitheatre 
is situated on the shore of the lake and is used for outside activities, 
May Day, and other programs. 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The College is wholly or partly responsible for bringing to its stu- 
dent body every year a number of distinguished artists and lecturers 
in the fields of art, the dance, and letters. The College also co-operates 
with the Civic Music Association in bringing to the campus throughout 
the year persons distinguished in the field of music. 

DRAMATICS 

The College offers exceptional advantages to students interested in 
dramatic activities. Numerous experimental plays, departmental plays, 
one-act plays, as well as full-length plays presented by the Play-Likers, 
give a considerable number of students opportunities not only to act, 
but also to do creative work in the arts of the theatre. The facilities 
for carrying on such work in the College are exceptional. A large room 
in the basement of Aycock Auditorium is used by students in play pro- 
duction for designing, constructing, and painting scenery; for sewing 
stage curtains and draperies; for experimenting in stage lighting and 
theatrical make-up; and for rehearsing plays. Modern stage electrical 
equipment of every type is used in the lighting experiments. The lab- 
oratory is a combination scenic studio and experimental workshop. 

RADIO 

In 1947-1948 the College included radio work in its curriculum. It 
now offers to its students courses in radio production and practical 
experience in broadcasting to the public. The courses train the stu- 



Organizations 39 

dents in script writing and program planning and familiarize them 
with the mechanics of production and of sound effects. Experience in 
broadcasting is first gained through practice in the College studios and 
is later supplemented by public appearances on a series of radio pro- 
grams devoted to the Woman's College. Students not only participate 
in these programs, but often act as directors and announcers. Affiliation 
with the radio station in Greensboro and with the University Hour in 
Chapel Hill gives the College the opportunity to provide this practical 
experience before the public microphone. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Societies. The Adelphian, Cornelian, Dikean, and Aletheian societies 
occupy an important place in student life. The societies as organiza- 
tions, managed entirely by students, give opportunity for a friendly 
social life. Membership is optional, but few representative students fail 
to identify themselves with one of the societies. Each society has a 
comfortable assembly hall in Students' Building and keeps open house 
several times during the year. Informal teas, dances, and parties are 
part of the regular programs, and each society has a formal dance 
during the spring semester. The regular business meetings are secret. 
The Board of Trustees prohibits any other secret organizations. 

Play-Likers. The College Theatre is operated by the Play-Likers 
under the guidance of a Faculty Director and the staff of the Drama 
Sequence division of the Department of English. Plays are presented 
as a part of the Lecture Bureau program and are open to the college 
and community public. During the more than twenty-five years of their 
existence the Play-Likers have staged hundreds of plays to audiences 
of from twelve to fifteen thousand persons each year. 

The work of this organization satisfies the need for entertainment 
of high standard and provides an outlet for practical laboratory work 
of the student majoring in dramatic art and taking the technical 
courses in the Drama Sequence. The work, both extra-curricular and 
in class, is exceptional in the undergraduate field. 

To recognize unusual merit and to distinguish the superior student 
in dramatics and worker in the College Theatre, membership is awarded 
in the Zeta Omega chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary 
dramatic fraternity, established at Woman's College some years ago. 

Y.W.C.A. The Young Women's Christian Association, affiliated with 
the national organization and with the World's Student Christian Fed- 
eration, seeks to aid students with their intimate daily problems of liv- 
ing, and also to form a channel through which they may unite them- 
selves with the great body of students throughout the world who seek 
the best way of life for themselves and for all people of all races. Any 
student of the College may become a member of the Association by ac- 



40 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

cepting its purposes. In conjunction with the church groups, the Associ- 
ation sponsors seminars, discussion groups, services of worship and 
religious education, chapel programs, recreational activities, intercol- 
legiate conferences, campus and community service work, and other 
group and individual activity of religious nature and significance. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Alpha Chapter of North Carolina of Phi Beta 
Kappa. Most elections to this section of the national honorary scholastic 
society are from the senior class, but there are occasional elections from 
the junior class and from the alumnae. Phi Beta Kappa has a loan fund 
available for juniors and seniors. Details will be found in the section 
on loan funds. 

Pi Kappa Lambda. Tau Chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda, the only na- 
tional honorary scholastic society recognizing superior students of music. 
Elections are from the senior class. 

Sigma Delta Pi. Alpha Tau Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi, the national 
Spanish fraternity. 

Omicron Nu, national home economics honor society. 

Tau Psi Omega, national French fraternity. 

Delta Pi Epsilon, national business education fraternity. 

Clubs. Students who are interested in some particular sport, pastime, 
or academic pursuit will find among the College clubs an organization 
that will give encouragement and counsel. Some groups are made up of 
both students and members of the faculty, but most often they are en- 
tirely controlled by the students themselves. Among the clubs which 
promote interest in sports, music, dramatics, debating, or departmental 
subjects are the following: Archery Club, Band, Botany Club, Camera 
Club, Chemistry Club, Choir, Classical Club, Dance Club, Dolphin Club, 
Educational Club, Glee Club, Golf Club, Home Economics Club, Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Mathematics Club, Medical Technologist Club, 
Music Education Club, Orchestra, Physics Club, Play-Likers, Quill Club, 
Seal Club, Der Singkreis, Speakers' Club, Square Dance Club, and 
Zoology Field Club. 

The Recreation Association sponsors the following activities : swim- 
ming, gymnastics, modern dance, hockey, softball, basketball, archery, 
volleyball, soccer, tennis, riding, golf, boating, and speedball. 

Alumnae Association. The Alumnae and Former Students Associa- 
tion of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina was 
organized in 1893 and incorporated by act of the General Assembly of 
North Carolina on March 8, 1909. The objects of the Association, as set 
forth in Section 3 of the Act incorporating it, are : "To encourage, foster, 
and promote education in the State of North Carolina; to aid and 
assist the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, by 
donations or otherwise; to aid and assist, by loans or donations, or 



Organizations 41 

both, worthy young; women of the state to obtain an education at the 
said College, and for such purposes to receive, hold, invest, manage, 
and disburse any fund or funds which may come into its possession." 
For a number of years the Association was engaged in raising funds 
with which to erect an Alumnae House on the campus. In 1935 the 
House was constructed and furnished at a cost of approximately $155,- 
000. It was opened in January, 1937. Alumnae House is headquarters 
for alumnae work in general. It also provides offices for the News Bu- 
reau, the Student Government Association, the student publications, 
and an assembly room for meetings of student clubs. The House is 
available for official alumnae, student, and college affairs — social, 
musical, literary, and academic. 

Officers for 1947-48 are: President, Mrs. Frances Gibson Satterfield, 
Atlanta, Ga.; First Vice-President, Mrs. Estelle Mendenhall LeGwin, 
Greensboro; Second Vice-President, Mrs. Gretchen Taylor Hobbs, 
Chapel Hill; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Nell Craig Strowd, Chapel 
Hill; Executive Secretary, Mrs. Betty Brown Jester, Greensboro. 

The Home Economics Foundation. The Home Economics Founda- 
tion was incorporated in July 1946 with headquarters at the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, North Car- 
olina. The corporation is a charitable, nonprofit, and educational or- 
ganization, having no capital stock. Its members shall include such 
individuals, firms, and corporations as shall meet the terms and condi- 
tions for membership as are prescribed from time to time by the by- 
laws of the corporation. The management of the corporation and its 
properties shall be vested in a Board of Directors, which shall have 
full power and authority to act. 

The purposes of the Home Economics Foundation are :(1) To aid 
and promote through financial assistance and other means all types 
of education, both undergraduate and graduate, and research in home 
economics in order that the Department of Home Economics at the 
Woman's College may serve the people, the homes, the institutions, 
and the industries of North Carolina with maximum values at mini- 
mum costs in money, time, and labor. This contribution will include 
foods and nutrition, clothing and textiles, housing and furnishings, 
child development and family relationships, equipment and household 
operations, teacher education, and institution administration. (2) To 
enable the Department of Home Economics to develop a strong teach- 
ing and research program through helping to secure and keep an out- 
standing and highly trained faculty. (3) To enable the Department of 
Home Economics to offer short service courses throughout the state 
by correspondence, by radio, and by special courses, forums, and con- 
ferences on various subjects of home economics. (4) To enable the De- 
partment of Home Economics to publish and distribute service bulletins 
and reports of research and studies on various subjects of home eco- 



42 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

nomics. (5) To enable the Department of Home Economics to sponsor 
various projects for improving the home, industrial, and institutional 
life of this state. 

The Home Economics Foundation will serve the homemakers, the 
teachers, the public schools, the state departments and agencies, the 
hospitals, the clinics and other care institutions, the farmers, the food 
processors, the merchants, the manufacturers, the hotels, the restau- 
rants, and the public utilities of the state. 

All funds contributed to the Foundation will be used for the pur- 
chase of special and additional equipment and teaching materials, for 
the supplementing of salaries of professors, instructors, and research 
specialists, and for the publication and distribution of papers, bulletins, 
and books, all in the interest of the development and service of the De- 
partment of Home Economics in the Woman's College to the people, 
homes and industries of North Carolina and the South. All funds 
solicited and collected for the Foundation will be applied as the donor 
requests insofar as is consistent with the program adopted. 

The officers of the Foundation are: President, Mrs. R. S. Ferguson, 
Taylorsville ; Vice-Presidents, Mrs. E. B. Hunter, Charlotte; Thurmond 
Chatham, Elkin; Charles A. Cannon, Kannapolis; Sam Blount, Wash- 
ington; Mrs. B. B. Everett, Palmyra; A. G. Meyers, Gastonia; H. D. 
Bateman, Wilson; and George S. Coble, Lexington; Secretary, Mrs. 
L. L. Miller, Raleigh; Treasurer, John C. Lockhart, Greensboro. 

Further information regarding the Home Economics Foundation 
may be secured by writing to Chancellor W. C. Jackson of the Woman's 
College. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Bulletins and Catalogues: Issued quarterly by the College; these 
contain matters of general and specific interest to the citizens of the 
state, to the faculty and prospective students, and to the College as 
a whole. 

Alumnae News: Published quarterly. The official organ of the Alum- 
nae and Former Students Association. 

The Carolinian: The College newspaper, issued Friday of each week. 

The Coraddi: The literary magazine of the College, issued quar- 
terly. 

New Books in the Library : A monthly list of the new books acquired 
by the library. 

The North Carolina Clubwoman: Published monthly in co-operation 
with the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs. 

The North Carolina Parent-Teacher Bulletin: Published monthly in 
co-operation with the North Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

Pine Needles: The College annual. 



Public Relations 43 

The Students' Handbook: An annual booklet containing rules and 
other information useful to the student. 

The Woman's Collection — A Bibliography: An annotated list of 
books and periodicals pertaining to the interests of women, with annual 
supplements. 

Occasional Publications: Each year the College publishes books and 
pamphlets other than those listed above, which appear regularly. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Placement Bureau. It is the purpose of the Woman's College to 
assist all of its graduates and former students in securing work in their 
chosen fields. Teachers, technicians, dietitians, secretaries, social 
workers, and others will be given every possible aid toward a realiza- 
tion of their ambitions in the professional and business world. This 
service does not end when the graduate is placed for the first time, but 
is continuous for all former students. There is no cost for the service. 
Former students desiring such assistance, however, must keep the Place- 
ment Bureau informed of their plans and activities. 

Extension Division. The Extension Division of the University of 
North Carolina desires to render aid to teachers in service by arrang- 
ing for technical courses for credit toward a degree or certificate, and 
to offer to them and to other citizens of the state cultural and profes- 
sional courses. The state does not provide this service except as it may 
be self-supporting; but afternoon or evening courses can be arranged 
at a minimum cost to persons on or off the campus. Lecture series by 
members of the faculty can also be arranged. Guilford County and 
counties adjacent to Guilford are the special field of the Woman's Col- 
lege. 

As a part of the extension work of the College, the Library offers 
its services to the people of the state, particularly to teachers and 
alumnae. With the co-operation of the faculty on technical and highly 
specialized subjects, it acts as an information bureau in answering 
questions. In addition, it sends out books on many subjects, especially 
women's problems and books of professional interest to teachers, pro- 
vided that these books are not in demand on the campus. 

Self-Help. Although it is not possible for a student to earn all of 
her expenses at the Woman's College or for all who apply to earn even 
a part, the College is concerned with giving every opportunity to those 
who desire help. A number of students are employed by the College in 
laboratories, offices, the Library, and dining rooms. 

For further information regarding the services of the Department 
of Public Relations address Mr. Charles W. Phillips, Director of Public 
relations. 



III. EXPENSES 

The College is organized and operated on the basis of a full scholas- 
tic year as a unit. Therefore all charges listed below are for the full 
scholastic year and are due and payable in advance, but for the con- 
venience of the students, charges may be paid at the times listed on 
the following pages. The College reserves the right to make, with the 
approval of the proper authorities, changes in any of the charges 
listed below at any time. It is necessary that all bills be paid on dates 
specified below. 

All students are supposed to matriculate for the full year, and must 
not expect any fees or dues remitted on account of their irregularities 
or change in plans, except in case of serious illness, making it necessary 
for the College physician to advise them to return home. All checks and 
money orders should be made payable to The Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina. 

In all business matters, the College prefers to deal directly with the 
students rather than with their parents or guardians. This gives the 
students business experience and makes them realize the cost of their 
training. 

For Students Living in Residence Halls 

In State Out State 

Tuition $150.00 $360.00 

Registration fee 15.00 15.00 

Medical fee , 10.00 10.00 

Board (9 months) 236.00 236.00 

Room rent (9 months) 42.00 42.00 

Laundry 27.00 27.00 

Other fees and charges 20.00 20.00 

$500.00 $710.00 

Entertainment fee 1 9.50 9.50 

Student Activities fee 2 9.50 9.50 



$519.00 $729.00 



1 This fee admits to the Civic Music concerts and the lecture program of the College 
and certain other College-wide activities. 

2 This fee was voted by the student body and approved by the administration. It pays 
membership or participation in the Student Government, the Y. W. C. A., the four 
societies, the Carolinian, the Coraddi, the Athletic Association and other College-wide 
activities. For an additional payment of $2.50, the student may obtain a copy of the 
annual, Pine Needles. 

44 



Expenses 45 

Note: The $10.00 room reservation fee is due when the student 
receives a statement of her admission to the College. There will be no 
refund of this fee after August 1. Each student is expected to bring 
for her own use the following: a pillow, bed linen, blankets (two pairs), 
bedspreads, and towels. 

For Students Not Living in Residence Halls 

In State Out State 

Tuition $150.00 $360.00 

Registration fee 15.00 15.00 

Medical fee 10.00 10.00 

Other fees and charges 20.00 20.00 

$195.00 $405.00 

Entertainment fee 3 9.50 9.50 

Student Activities fee 4 9.50 9.50 



$214.00 $424.00 

In addition to the amounts heretofore listed, students must purchase 
a gymnasium outfit costing approximately $17.05. (Commercial stu- 
dents are charged $10.15 for gymnasium suit.) A laboratory fee of $1.25 
will be charged for the chest X-ray record which is required of every 
new student. 

The payments for the regular charges and fees will be due as fol- 
lows, in advance: 

For Students Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out State 

Room reservation fee $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

On entrance 140.00 210.00 

November 15 125.00 190.00 

January 15 140.00 200.00 

March 15 104.00 119.00 



$519.00 $729.00 

For Students Not Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out State 

On entrance $ 57.00 $120.00 

November 15 50.00 92.00 

January 15 57.00 120.00 

March 15 50.00 92.00 



$214.00 $424.00 



3 See first footnote, p. 44. 
4 See second footnote, p. 44. 



46 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

In addition to the above, for students taking private instruction in 
all departments of Applied Music, Instrumental, or Special Vocal Music, 
for each course: 

On entrance $15.00 

November 15 15.00 

January 15 15.00 

March 15 15.00 

$60.00 

Fee for the Use of Practice Piano or Voice Practice 

Juniors and seniors in B.S. in music course, $18.00 for the year. 
Freshmen and sophomores in B.S. in music course, $14.00 for 
the year. 

Other music students, $9.00 for the year. 

Fee for Organ Practice 

One hour per week on the three-manual organ, $9.00 for the year. 
One hour per week on the two-manual organ, $5.00 for the year. 

Fee for Violin and Other Orchestral Instruments, Practice Room 

Freshmen and sophomores in B.S. in music, $7.00 for the year. 
Juniors and seniors in B.S. in music, $9.00 for the year. 
Other violin students, $4.50 for the year. 

A special fee of $45.00 for the year is charged for the two courses, 
Music 335 and 336. 

PAYMENT FOR NEW STUDENTS ENTERING THE SECOND 

SEMESTER 

For Students Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out State 

On entrance $150.00 $210.00 

March 15 125.00 169.00 

$275.00 $379.00 

For Students Not Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out State 

On entrance $ 60.00 $115.00 

March 15 47.00 97.00 

$107.00 $212.00 



Expenses 47 

LABORATORY FEES 

To defray the cost of materials consumed by the student in her 
laboratory work, certain fees, ranging in amount from $1.00 to $8.00, 
according to the course taken, will be charged. These fees must be paid 
on the day of registration, and no student may be enrolled in a course 
until the required fee is paid. These fees are listed in course descrip- 
tions appearing elsewhere in the catalogue. 

OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES 

Additional expenses at the College will be the cost of textbooks, 
gymnasium outfit, diagnostic X-ray films, and for graduation, a fee 
of $7.50. 

SPECIAL BUSINESS COURSES 

To any student not boarding in the residence halls the charges for a 
special course in stenography will be $50.00 for tuition, and the regu- 
lar fees, $81.00 and a laboratory fee of $2.00 for each semester. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who register for some form of Applied Music only (piano, 
organ, voice, violin) pay $75.00. This is payable $45.00 on entrance, 
$30.00 at the beginning of the spring semester. 

For day students who take not more than six semester hours of 
work the charge is $5.00 a semester hour. 

For special students who audit a course the charge is $5.00 per 
semester. 

TEXTBOOKS 

Students are required to purchase their textbooks. For their con- 
venience the College maintains a depository, where all necessary books 
may be had at list prices. Students are advised to bring any useful 
reference books they may already have. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Arranged alphabetically by the key word in the name of the fellow- 
ship or scholarship. 

Alex Mathews Arnett Memorial Scholarship Fund. Mr. C. Y. 
Stephens of Laurel, Maryland, established this fund as a memorial to 
Alex Mathews Arnett, former professor of history at the Woman's Col- 
lege. A sum of $1,000 annually is to be used to aid worthy and needy 
students. Applications for aid from this fund should be filed with the 
Loan Fund Committee. 

The Borden Home Economics Scholarship Award. The Borden 
Company Foundation, Incorporated, New York City, established at the 
Woman's College an annual scholarship award in the amount of $300. 
All senior students majoring in home economics who have included in 
their curricula two or more courses in food and nutrition shall be eli- 
gible for the award. A student will be selected from those eligible on 
the basis of highest scholastic achievement prior to the senior year. 

The Hennie Bynum Fund. The late Judge John Gray Bynum be- 
queathed to the College $1,000, the income from which is used to aid 
young women from the Presbyterian Church of Morganton, North 
Carolina. 

The Mary Channing Coleman Memorial Fund. This fund is estab- 
lished by the staff and the graduates of the Department of Physical 
Education in memory of Miss Mary Channing Coleman, who was head 
of the Department from 1920 until her death in 1947. The fund offers a 
scholarship for graduate work in Health, Physical Education and Rec- 
reation. The scholarship is awarded to a senior candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; but if there is no 
member of the graduating class who meets the conditions of the schol- 
arship recognition, the committee shall have the right to award the 
scholarship to a student who has completed her undergraduate profes- 
sional education at the Woman's College within the preceding five 
years. A committee shall be appointed by the Chancellor to assist in 
making the award. 

The Danforth Summer Fellowships. The Danforth Foundation 
of St. Louis, Missouri, has established two annual fellowships at the 
Woman's College for home economics majors. Each fellowship covers 
the expenses of the respective award. The recipients of these fellow- 
ships are selected by the home economics faculty. One fellowship is to 
an outstanding junior in home economics for four weeks of study, travel 
and recreation in July and August, two weeks in St. Louis and two 
weeks at Camp Miniwanca of the American Youth Foundation on Lake 

48 



Fellowships and Scholarships 49 

Michigan. The other fellowship is to an outstanding freshman in home 
economics for two weeks of study and recreation in August at Camp 
Miniwanca. 

The Harriet Elliott Social Science Forum Fund. This fund has 
been set up as a memorial to Dean Harriet Elliott, who was for many 
years a Professor of Political Science at the College and Dean of "Wom- 
en for twelve years. The income from the fund will be used for the 
support of the annual Social Science Forum and for the establishment 
of scholarships or fellowships in Political Science. 

Escheats Fund. A number of scholarships, valued at $100 a year, 
are available to students who are residents of North Carolina, through 
the Escheats Fund of the consolidated University of North Carolina. 
Forms for applying for an Escheats scholarship may be secured from 
the Scholarship Committee. 

The Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Gertrude Whittier Menden- 
hall, head of the Department of Mathematics from the founding of the 
College until her death in 1926, left to the College a fund of $2,091.41 
to endow a scholarship to be named in honor of her aunt, Judith J. 
Mendenhall. The will provides that a faculty committee award the 
scholarship annually to a deserving student "who has made good records 
in preparatory and freshman mathematics and who desires to do higher 
work in mathematics and allied sciences." 

Palmyra Pharr Scholarship Fund. Dr. Fred W. Morrison, a for- 
mer member of the College faculty, established this fund in honor of 
his mother, Palmyra Pharr Morrison, in 1942, and has made subse- 
quent additions to the fund. The present value of the fund is $10,- 
542.11. At present both principal and income are to be used to aid 
students designated by Dr. Morrison with the advice of the Committee 
on Admissions. Preference will be given to students from Rowan and 
Cabarrus counties. 

Phi Beta Kappa Scholarship. The Woman's College section of the 
Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in North Carolina has a scholarship 
fund of $1,000.00, the proceeds from which may be granted to B.A. 
juniors and seniors with good scholastic records. 

Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholarship Fund. Mrs. Elizabeth Reeves 
Lyon, Class of 1938, has established the Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholar- 
ship Fund in honor of her mother. The income from the funds invested 
shall be used to support a scholarship which shall be awarded annually 
to a student registered or registering as an art major in the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina. 

Scholarship in Science. The Faculty Science Club offers a scholar- 
ship in science. This scholarship is awarded to a rising junior, a rising 
senior, or a graduating senior of the Woman's College majoring in any 
department represented in the Science Club. The award is made on the 



50 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

basis of scholarship, personality, and financial need. The fund for the 
award consists of a percentage of the dues of members of the Science 
Club, of contributions which the various student organizations in 
science may make, and of gifts from members of the Science Club and 
from others interested in science. 

The Anna Howard Shaw Scholarship Fund. The late Miss Lucy 
B. Anthony of Moylan, Pennsylvania, established this fund to keep alive 
the memory of Dr. Anna Howard Shaw. The scholarship is awarded 
annually to an outstanding student in the field of social science. 

Consolidated University Graduate Fellowship. The University at 
Chapel Hill offers a graduate scholarship of $250.00 and tuition charges 
each year to a graduate of the Woman's College. 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship. The 
North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy 
offers eleven scholarships at Woman's College to descendants of Con- 
federate veterans. These scholarships are worth from $75 to $130 each. 

Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. The late Mrs. Henry Weil of Golds- 
boro, North Carolina, established at the College in memory of her hus- 
band a fund now amounting to $23,778.00, known as the Henry Weil 
Fellowship Fund. 

(1) The Henry Weil Fellowship shall be awarded each year to a mem- 
ber of the graduating class, but if there is no member of the class 
who meets the conditions of the award, the committee shall have 
the right to award the fellowship to a member of any class gradu- 
ating within the preceding five years. 

(2) A committee shall be appointed by the Chancellor to assist in 
making the award. 

The Mina Weil Endowment Fund. Mrs. Janet Weil Bluethenthal 
established an endowment of $6,000 in honor of her mother. The in- 
come from this fund is granted for scholarships. 

The Mina Weil Scholarship. In memory of her mother, Mrs. Mina 
Weil, Miss Gertrude Weil has given $3,000 for the establishment of a 
scholarship in the social sciences. The income from this fund will be 
awarded annually to a member of the junior or senior class who is 
majoring in a social science. The student shall be selected by a com- 
mittee from the social science faculty, appointed by the Chancellor. 

The Winfield Endowment. Miss Martha Elizabeth Winfield, for 
many years a professor of English in the College, left an endowment of 
$3,000. The income is awarded each year as a scholarship to a junior 
or senior of promise in the Department of English who is in need of 
financial assistance. 



LOAN FUNDS 

Arranged alphabetically by the key word in the name of the fund. 

It is the general policy of the Loan Fund Committee to give pref- 
erence to applications from juniors and seniors in their borrowing. The 
total amount for any student is limited. Loans that are made are based 
somewhat on the scholarship of the student as well as on her financial 
needs. 

All loans are secured by notes, signed by the borrower and two 
guarantors. For most loans, interest at three per cent begins in June 
after graduation or after withdrawal from college. Some funds draw 
interest from the date of the note. 

The Alamance County Chapter op the Alumnae Association 
established a loan fund. It is now $314.00. Students from Alamance 
County are eligible for aid from this fund. 

The Alumnae Class Organ Fund, now amounting to $757.09 was 
established as a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. This will 
then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Alumnae Loan and Scholarship Fund. For the purpose of 
making loans to worthy students, chiefly in the higher classes, who could 
not return to college without aid, the Alumnae Association raised a 
fund. This fund amounts to $31,924.00. 

The Washington, D. C. Chapter of the Alumnae Association 
established a loan fund. It is now $449.45. 

The Sarah Atkinson Loan Fund was established by the Class of 
1939 and the Art Club as a memorial to Sarah Atkinson, a member of 
the Class of 1939. Family, friends, and students have contributed to 
the fund to the extent of $272.05. This will be used to aid worthy 
students. 

Mrs. James Boyd, Southern Pines, North Carolina, contributed $300 
to be used as a loan fund. 

The Bryant Loan Fund. The Bryant Loan Fund of $7,500 be- 
queathed to the College by the late Victor S. Bryant, of Durham, North 
Carolina, is in constant use. Notes made from this loan fund bear six 
per cent interest from the date of the loan. 

The Gladys Bullock Memorial Loan Fund. Mrs. S. F. Bullock of 
Stem, North Carolina, established a loan fund of $300 as a memorial 
to her daughter, Gladys Bullock, Class of 1927. 

The Daphne Carraway Memorial Loan Fund. Miss Irma Carra- 

way, Class of 1897, established this loan fund in memory of her sister, 

Daphne Carraway, Class of 1902. Graduates of the Barium Springs 

Orphanage have the preference to these loans. The amount of this 

fund is $579.49. 

51 



52 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The Class of 1925 established a loan fund of $100. It is now $153.33. 

Class of 1929 Loan Fund. The Class of 1929 established a loan 
fund. It is now $506.31. 

The Class of 1932 gave a fund of $150 to be used as a loan until 
the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1933 gave $75 as a loan fund. 

The Class of 1935 gave a fund to be used as a loan. It is now 
$416.03. 

The Class of 1936 established a loan fund of $275.02. This will be 
used for loans until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1938 established a loan fund. It amounts to $29.34. 

The Class of 1940 established a loan fund of $150. 

The Judge E. B. Cline Loan Fund of $50.00 was established by the 
late Mrs. Cline in memory of her husband. Students from Hickory or 
Catawba County are given preference for aid from this fund. 

Thp Laura H. Coit Loan Fund is being given by students of the 
College. It is now $3,866.57. 

The Ida Haughton Cowan Loan Fund. Miss Ida H. Cowan, Class 
of 1902, gave a loan fund in memory of her mother. It is now $227.51. 

Federation of Women's Clubs Music Loan Fund. A fund of $200 
was established by the Federation of Women's Clubs. The loans are 
granted to residents of North Carolina, preference being given to jun- 
iors and seniors. 

Mollie K. Fetzer Loan Fund. This loan was established by T. J. 
Fetzer as a memorial to his sister. It is now $598.98. 

The E. J. Forney Fund. The sum of $250 was given as a loan fund 
to honor the late Mr. Forney, who served the College as treasurer from 
1892 to 1948. 

Mary Foust and Caroline McNeill Loan Fund was established 
by Dr. J. I. Foust, late President, and Mrs. J. I. Foust, jointly in mem- 
ory of Mary Foust Armstrong and Caroline McNeill. The fund is now 
$1,129.34. 

Gray Hall Loan Fund. The students of Gray Hall have established 
a loan fund which will be increased by the students from that hall 
from year to year. 

Martha Irvin Groome Memorial Loan Fund. Mrs. Ina Lee Groome, 
Class 1934, has established this fund in memory of Mrs. Martha Irvin 
Groome. Students in the Home Economics department are eligible for 
aid from the fund. 



Loan Funds 53 

The Claude Heath Loan Fund. Mrs. W. 0. Nisbet of Charlotte, 
North Carolina, established a fund in 1938 in memory of her brother, 
Mr. Claude Heath. The fund amounts to $110.50. 

The Home Economics Club established a loan fund. The fund now 
amounts to $483.00. 

Mr. J. B. Ivey of Charlotte, North Carolina, gave $300 to be known 
as The J. B. Ivey Student Loan Fund. 

The North Carolina Association of Jewish Women established a 
loan fund for emergency aid to students in case of serious illness. It 
is now $258.36. 

The Liberty Hall Chapter Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion Membership Memorial Scholarship Loan Fund. The loan fund 
was established in June, 1935, as a memorial to members of the chap- 
ter. The fund now amounts to $2,020.00. It is available to juniors and 
seniors. 

Elizabeth Crow Mahler Loan Fund. This fund was established 
by Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first woman principal of the College, 
in memory of her niece. This fund is now $268.30. 

The jKatharine Mavity Martin Loan Fund. The faculty wives 
through their organization gave to the College the Katharine Mavity 
Martin Loan Fund of $300.00 for use in emergencies. This fund is a 
memorial to Mrs. Katharine Mavity Martin, wife of W. W. Martin, 
retired, professor of psychology at the College. 

The Masonic Theatre Educational Loan Fund of New Bern. The 
Scottish Rite Masons of Eastern North Carolina contributed a loan 
fund of $200. It is now $351.73. 

The McIver Loan Fund. As a memorial to the founder and first 
president of the College, the Alumnae Association raised the McIver 
Loan Fund, now amounting to $13,621.00. 

Miss Jessie McLean gave $50 to be used as a loan for students 
needing special medical attention. It is now $81.17. 

The General Medical Fund of $177.90 was established for use as 
a loan fund for emergency aid to students needing special medical 
attention. 

Methodist Student Loan Fund. This is a limited fund available 
in small amounts to Methodist students who are meeting fully all of the 
requirements of the Board of Education of the Methodist Church. 

The Lily Connally Morehead Loan Fund. The late Mrs. Lily 
Mebane, of Spray, North Carolina, gave $4,170 as a nucleus of a loan 
fund in memory of her mother. The fund is now $6,131.00. 



54 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The Musgrove Memorial Fund. Mrs. Jeannette Musgrove Bounds, 
Class of 1914, established a loan fund of $100 in memory of her father. 
It is now $164.81. 

May Oettinger Memorial Loan Fund. This fund has been estab- 
lished by the Business and Professional Women's Club of Kinston, N. C, 
as a memorial to Miss May Oettinger. The recipient of any part of the 
loan fund shall be a bona fide graduate of one of the Lenoir County 
high schools. 

The Phi Beta >Kappa Loan Fund. The Woman's College section of 
Phi Beta Kappa has established a fund from which small loans may be 
made to selected students while here as undergraduates or to aid them 
to undertake graduate studies. 

Rebecca Christine Phoenix Memorial Loan Fund. This was 
established in 1932 by Mr. John J. Phoenix and family in memory of his 
daughter. It is now $265.23. 

The Eunice Kirkpatrick Rankin Loan Fund. This fund of $270.00 
was established by the Atlanta Alumnae Club, in memory of Mrs. Eunice 
Kirkpatrick Rankin, a member of the Class of 1901, and a former 
president of this club. The fund is to be used preferably, but not neces- 
sarily, to aid a student from Georgia. 

The Camilla Croom Rodman Scholarships. Col. W. B. Rodman of 
Norfolk, Virginia, established two scholarships in memory of his mother. 
The donor reserves the right to select the beneficiaries of these scholar- 
ships, one of which is to be awarded to a student from Hyde County 
and the other to a student from the state at large. This is a loan fund 
except when relatives of Colonel Rodman are designated. 

The Winfield H. Rogers Fund. The Quill Club of 1947 has estab- 
lished a loan fund of $170.00 in memory of Dr. Winfield H. Rogers, 
former head of the Department of English. English majors are eligible 
for loans from this fund. 

The Royal Arch and Knights Templar Loan Fund was estab- 
lished in the fall of 1921. It is now $3,115.54. 

Student Government Fund of 1935. This fund was established as 
a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. It amounts to $298.55. 

The Students' Loan Fund was established in 1892-1893. It is made 
up of funds given by a number of friends of the College. Among these 
are the following: Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, who gave the Ade- 
laide Worth Daniels Fund; Mrs. J. C. Buxton; General and Mrs. Julian 
S. Carr; Charles Broadway Rouss; and Mr. and Mrs. V. Everit Macy. 
This fund now amounts to $6,841.62. 



Loan Funds 55 

Mary McLean Taylor Memorial Fund. Carrie McLean Taylor, 
Class of 1926, has established a loan fund of $150.00 as a memorial to 
her mother, Mary McLean Taylor. Preference will be given to students 
of the one-year commercial course. 

The Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund. The late Mrs. 
C. W. Tillett of Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1933 to 1935 donated 
$100 yearly to the College for a gift scholarship. In September, 1935, 
she founded the Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund with an 
initial gift of $100. This fund is available for juniors and seniors, 
preferably seniors. It is a memorial to Mrs. Tillett's small daughter, 
Carrie MacRae Tillett. 

Town Students' Loan Fund. The Town Students' organization es- 
tablished a loan fund of $75.00. The money is to be loaned in small 
amounts to junior, senior, and commercial town students needing finan- 
cial assistance. 

Ruth Gooding Worley Fund. Mrs. Ruth Worley Simmons, an 
alumna of the College, and the other children of Mrs. Ruth Gooding 
Worley established this fund of $100 in memory of their mother. 

Doris Wright Memorial Fund. This fund of $1,000 was contributed 
by friends of the late C. C. Wright, Superintendent of Education in 
Wilkes County. The fund is used for aiding students from Wilkes 
County. It is now $2,020.47. 



IV. ADMISSION 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants for admission to the College should be at least sixteen 
years of age, of good character, and in good physical condition. 

Students are admitted by certificates or by examination. Those ad- 
mitted by certificate must- be graduates of standard secondary schools 
and must be recommended by the school. The College reserves the right 
to reject any applicant who ranked in the lower half of her graduat- 
ing class. 

A report from the applicant's physician is required. Blanks for this 
purpose are furnished with the application blanks and must be returned 
when the application for admission is submitted. 

Early application is advisable. Rooms in the residence halls are 
assigned in order of application, and applications will not be accepted 
after all rooms have been assigned. The $10.00 room reservation fee 
may be sent with the application or immediately upon receipt of a 
statement of admission. 

Requests for application forms or other communications concerning 
admission should be addressed to Miss Mildred P. Newton, Secretary 
of Admissions. 

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS 

An applicant for admission to the freshman class must be a graduate 
of a standard secondary school and must present at least fifteen accept- 
able units of credit. 

Ten and one-half units are prescribed for admission to candidacy 
for any degree. They are English 4, algebra IVz, plane geometry 1, 
foreign language (two years of one language) 2, and social science 2, 
one of which must be in history. For the Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics, Physical Education, and Nursing degrees, one unit of science 
is required. For the Bachelor of Science or Arts in Music, 2 units of 
music are required. This work is usually taken in private lessons. For 
the Bachelor of Fine Arts with major in art, 1 unit of typewriting is 
required. It is also strongly recommended that two languages be taken 
with 4 units submitted for admission. It is also recommended that 
two units of science (chemistry, biology or physics) be submitted for 
admission. 

It is strongly recommended that the two and one-half to four and 
one-half elective units be made up from the fields of mathematics (sec- 
ond-year algebra for a full year, solid geometry for a half year, and 
plane trigonometry for a half year) ; social science (ancient history, 
medieval and modern history, modern history, English history, Ameri- 
can history, American history and civics as a combination, civics, 

56 



Admission 57 

sociology, and economics) ; foreign language (French, Geman, Span- 
ish, Latin, and Greek, with not fewer than two units in any one) ; and 
science with full laboratory (chemistry, physics, biology, botany, 
zoology, geology, physiography, and general science). One unit is 
allowed for a full year's work in any one of the named sciences, pro- 
vided lectures or recitations and laboratory work are involved; if no 
laboratory work is included, any one of the named sciences, taken for 
a full year, carries only a half unit credit. Other elective subjects 
allowed are: art, Bible, music or speech, a half or one unit each; voca- 
tional subjects (which include shorthand and typewriting, 1 unit; 
bookkeeping, 1 unit; commercial arithmetic, 1 unit; home economics, 2 
units, and commercial geography, Vz unit), 3 units, maximum gen- 
erally allowed. 

A credit of a half unit is allowed in very few subjects; less than a 
half unit will not be allowed in any subject. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students entering with advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class. 

Applicants for admission from other colleges should send to the 
Registrar: (1) an official statement of entrance and college records; 
(2) a catalogue of the institution from which they transfer, marked to 
indicate the courses taken; and (3) a statement of honorable dismissal. 
It is desirable that the official transcript of the applicant's entrance 
and college record of work to the end of the first semester of the year 
prior to her transfer be sent to the Registrar before May 1. This cer- 
tificate should include a statement of the subjects being pursued dur- 
ing the second semester, together with the number of hours of credit 
to be secured in each. The letter of honorable dismissal and the final 
record of the second semester should be sent to the Registrar before 
July 1. 

An average of at least C is required for admission to advanced 
standing. After admission an average of at least C must be main- 
tained by all transfer students who enter the junior class. The stand- 
ing of the college previously attended and the quality as well as the 
quantity of the student's work will receive consideration when credit 
is estimated. Should the student's work during her first year at this 
College prove unsatisfactory, the amount of credit allowed may be 
reduced. 

ADMISSION TO SERVICE WOMEN 

The Woman's College is on the approved list of the Veterans Admin- 
istration and may accept students for regular, retraining, or refresher 
courses under the previsions of the Service Men's Readjustment Act 
of 1944, Public Law Number 346. 

For more detailed information, write the Secretary of Admissions. 



V. DEGREES 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELORS DEGREE 

The College offers courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
with an opportunity for major work in sixteen fields and in five inter- 
departmental majors; Bachelor of Science, with majors in five profes- 
sional fields; and Bachelor of Fine Arts, with a major in Art. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. A 
freshman whose proficiency in composition and in reading is below 
collegiate standard shall be enrolled in English A, without credit, until 
the required standard is attained and she can be admitted to English 
101. A deficient student may also be asked to work in a special section 
in remedial English, one or two hours a week, while taking English 
101. Any undergraduate whose work in any course gives evidence of 
lack of proficiency in written English or in reading ability shall be 
referred to the Department of English; she will then be sent to a 
section in remedial English to correct her deficiencies. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is the 
completion of 122 semester hours with 204 quality points. The hours 
required must include : e jj 

English 1 101-102, 211-212 12 

Social Sciences 2 12 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 3 12 

Foreign Language (one) 12 

or a reading knowledge 4 

Health 101 3 

Major Subjects 24 to 42 

Physical Education r 2 



1 See the statement above regarding the English proficiency requirement. 

2 Six hours must be in history (usually History 101-102) ; the remaining six may be 
in history, government, economics, sociology, or geography. See 3 . 

3 Six hours must be taken in biology, chemistry or physics ; the remaining six may 
be in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, psychology 211-212 or geography 211- 
212. Geography 211-212 may be taken in partial fulfillment of the Natural Science 
requirement ; certain courses in regional and economic geography may be taken in 
partial fulfillment of the Social Science requirement, but no student may offer geography 
in partial fulfillment of both requirements. 

•*To prove a reading knowledge of a language, the student must take an examina- 
tion, the results of which will be judged by accuracy in understanding the passages 
read. 

58 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 59 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

The specified requirements for graduation, except those in the major 
subject, must ordinarily be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 
In exceptional cases a required subject may, with the consent of the 
adviser and the class chairman, be taken later than the freshman and 
sophomore years. 

Freshmen are expected to register for the following courses: 

English 101-102, 6 s.h.; foreign language, 6 s.h.; Biology 101-102, 
Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104, Mathematics 101-102, or 103-104, or 
105-106, or Physics 101-102 6 s.h.; History 101-102, 6 s.h.; Health 101, 
3 s.h. and elective, 3 s.h., taken in alternate semesters; and physical 
education. Electives open to freshmen: Art 101, 103; Astronomy 101; 
Biology 121; Classical Civilization 111; English 105, 107, 111; Geogra- 
phy 101; Music 127; Sociology 111. 

Some exceptions to these requirements follow: 

Pre-medical students and those preparing to be laboratory techni- 
cians are advised to take biology and chemistry in the freshman year 
and two sciences in the sophomore year. Such students need not take 
Health 101. 

Students who plan to major in mathematics and who wish to secure 
a certificate to teach general science also are advised to choose both 
mathematics and a science in the freshman year. 

Freshmen may take four semester hours of applied music of college 
grade, provided that a music faculty committee grants permission after 
an entrance test in performance. Any first registration for credit in 
applied music must be preceded by a successful examination before a 
music faculty committee. Twelve hours is the maximum credit allowed. 

Sophomores are expected to register for the following courses: 

English 211-212; foreign language (continuation of freshman lan- 
guage) 6 s.h.; biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics or 
psychology 6 s.h.; 5 social science (Grade II), 6 s.h.; 6 electives (Grade 
II) 6 s.h. 

Courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores are designated as 
Grade I, numbered 100-199; those primarily for sophomores as Grade 
II, 200-299; those primarily for juniors and seniors as Grade III, 300- 
399. Grade IV, 400-499, indicates courses open only to seniors or gradu- 
ate students. Grade V, graduate students only. Freshmen are admitted 



5 Political Science is not open to sophomores. 

"Sophomores planning to teach should elect Psychology 221-222. 



60 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

to courses of Grade II and sophomores to those of Grade III only by 
special permission given by the class chairman and the instructor 
concerned. 

JUNIOR-SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

In her junior and senior year each candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts must complete a considerable amount of work in a field 
of concentration. The selection of the field for intensive study shall 
be made by the student after consultation with her class chairman not 
later than the second semester of her sophomore year. In the field of 
concentration two types are provided: 

I. Departmental Major 

The departmental major lies within one department. The following 
subjects offer an opportunity for major work: Art, Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics, English, French, German, Greek, History and Political 
Science, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, 
Spanish. 

A student must take not less than 24 nor more than 36 semester 
hours above Grade I in the major subject. With the approval of the 
major department adviser and her class chairman, however, she may 
choose part of the major work from closely related departments. 

II. Interdepartmental and Preprofessional Majors 

Five interdepartmental majors are offered: 

Laboratory Technician 
Pre-medical 
Elementary Education 
Art, Dance and Drama 
Recreation 

An interdepartmental major includes work in two or three depart- 
ments. When in two departments, not less than 15 semester hours nor 
more than 21 shall be offered in one subject, the minimum total to be 
36 hours above Grade I. When in three departments, not less than 
9 semester hours in a subject shall count toward the major, the mini- 
mum total to be 42 semester hours. 

The specified requirements for three of the interdepartmental majors 
are listed on pages 62, 63, 64. The requirements for the other two will 
be furnished upon request. 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 61 

HONORS WORK 

A program of Honors Work for very superior seniors was estab- 
lished at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in 
1947. 

Purpose 

The purpose of the Honors program is to unify and deepen the stu- 
dent's grasp of the whole field of her major and to develop the student's 
intellectual initiative and independence through special study or research 
of particular interest to her. 

Requirements for Admission to the Program 

Only very superior students may be considered as candidates for 
Honors Work. 

The specific requirements for eligibility are: (1) recommendations 
from three members of the faculty, including the head and one other 
member of the department in which the student wishes to do Honors 
Work (these recommendations shall be sent to the Committee on Hon- 
ors Work independently and shall, with the possible exception of the 
head of the department, be from members of the faculty who have 
taught the student) ; (2) a minimum average for courses taken at the 
Woman's College — 3.5 in courses in her major subject above Grade I 
and 3.0 in all other courses which carry credit (both hours and quality 
points) for graduation; (3) approval of the Committee on Honors 
Work. 

Method of Admission to Candidacy 

Application for admission should be made by the student on the 
regular application form to the Chairman of the Committee on Honors 
Work not later than May 15 of the student's junior year. 

Work of the Candidate 

The Honors Work shall replace six semester hours of classroom 
work in the senior year, three in each semester. Approximately half of 
the work is to be devoted to an intensive study in the major subject, the 
other half to preparation for an Honors Examination in the major 
subject, both parts of the program to be carried out under the guidance 
of a member of the faculty. Upon successful completion of her Honors 
Work, the student shall receive her degree with Honors in the field of 
her major. 

More detailed information may be obtained from the Committee on 
Honors Work or from department heads. 



62 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Freshman-Sophomore Junior-Senior 

Requirements S.H. Requirements S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 Education 315, 330, 481, 463. . . 15 

History 101-102, 211, 212 12 and 421, 423, 424, 433 for 

Science or Mathematics 7 12 Primary majors or 443, 444, 

Foreign Language (one) or a 446 for Grammar Grade 

reading knowledge 12 majors 8 

Health 101 3 Art 101 8 , 333 ....... . 6 

Psychology 221-222 6 Geography 335, 336 6 

Physical Education 2 Health 341 3 

Music 341, 342 6 

Political Science 321, 322, 

or 325 3 

Psychology 326 3 

Physical Education 341 3 

59 53 

Electives 9 

Freshman (Art 101 urged) 3 

Junior-Senior 10 or 7 



10 

Total 122 and 204 quality points 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR IN ART, DANCE, AND DRAMA 
LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The purpose of this course is twofold: 

1. To correlate the arts and provide opportunity for experience and 
investigation in each of the several arts for the student who does 
not know which art she wishes to emphasize, and 

2. To provide a broad background for students who may wish to take 
professional training, or to do graduate work in one of the fields 
after graduation from college. The end in view is not to produce 
finished actors, artists, or dancers. The emphasis is rather upon an 
integrated program of study that utilizes the courses in each depart- 
ment most closely related to courses in other departments. 

This program is administered by a committee composed of the Head 
of the Art Department, the Director of Dance in the Physical Educa- 
tion Department, and the Chairman of Drama in the English Depart- 
ment. 

7 Six hours must be taken in biology, chemistry or physics ; the remaining six may 
be in mathematics, biology, chemistry, geography 211-212, or physics. 

8 If Art 101 is taken as the freshman elective, 3 additional hours of a general 
elective work may be taken in the junior-senior years. 

"Economics 325 and Sociology 326 are especially recommended as junior-senior 
electivet). 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 63 

The requirements for the freshman and sophomore years are those 
of the Bachelor of Arts degree except that students are advised to take 
Art 101, Design, in the freshman year and Physical Education 145 and 
246, Dance in the sophomore year. 

The requirements for the junior and senior years include work of 
not less than nine semester hours in each of the departments of Art, 
English, and Physical Education. 

The courses required in each department are: 

Art 372, 377, and one Grade III Art History course 9 s.h. 

English 325, 327-328, 333 12 s.h. 

Physical Education 345-346, 354, 355-356 10 s.h. 

The remaining hours of the minimum total of forty-two semester 
hours required for an interdepartmental major in three departments 
will be taken according to the need or interest of the individual student. 

In the entire program there are twenty-four hours of free electives, 
six in the sophomore year and eighteen in the junior-senior years. These 
eighteen hours shall not be taken in any of the three fields involved 
in this major. 

In addition to the specific requirements for the junior and senior 
years, each interdepartment degree candidate is required to make a 
major contribution in each of the three fields, the nature of the contri- 
bution to be determined by the committee directing the degree program. 
The possibilities are, for example: designing the set or costumes for a 
major production of a play; choreographing a group dance for the 
annual dance recital; playing a leading role in a major production in 
drama. 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR IN RECREATION 

An interdepartmental major in Recreation leading to a Bachelor of 
Arts degree is offered by the Departments of Sociology and Physical 
Education. 

A committee composed of one member from each of the departments 
of Sociology and Physical Education administers the program. A stu- 
dent will be admitted to this major only after approval by the two 
departments. The following is the curriculum: 

Freshman- Sophomore Requirements 

S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

History 101-102, Sociology 211-212 12 

"Biology 101-102, Psychology 211-212 12 

Foreign Language (one) or a reading knowledge 12 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 241, 334, 342 8 11 

Elective 3 

10 Chemistry or Physics may fulfill this requirement on the approval of the adviser. 
"Includes two s.h. of freshman-sophomore required Physical Education. 



64 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Junior-Senior Requirements 

Junior Year S.H. Senior Year S.H. 

Physical Education 339, 340 2 2 Sociology 325, 326 2 3 

Physical Education 344, 343 3 1 Art 336 2 

Physical Education 336 or 337 1 English 327 or 317 3 

English (Speech) 2 English (Story Telling) 2 

Economics 325 3 Physical Education 338 1 

Sociology 333, 340 3 3 Elective (Sociology) 3 

Health 236 1 "Elective (B.S.) 2 

Political Science 322 3 Elective 6 6 

Elective 6 

15 15 



15 15 



Summer Experience: Between the sophomore and junior years, a 
student will be expected to have a playground or camp counseling expe- 
rience, approved by the committee administering the recreation major. 
During the summer between her junior and senior years, the committee 
will work out a summer experience suited to the student's particular 
range of interests. 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN SOCIAL WORK 

The Sociology Department has planned a sequence of courses for 
those students who are preparing themselves for graduate professional 
education in social work, and also for those students who wish to qualify 
for positions in social agencies for which graduate professional edu- 
cation is not now required. This sequence follows th^ standards set by 
the American Association of Schools of Social Work. 

An adviser in the Sociology Department has been assigned to advise 
all students interested in the preprofessional program in social work. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Courses fulfilling the requirements for graduation in the fields of 
concentration shall be above Grade I. At least 36 of the student's last 
60 hours shall be of Grade III or IV, and not more than 12 of the last 
60 may be of Grade I. When, however, this regulation will work a 
special hardship upon a student, adjustments will be made by the class 
chairman and the student's adviser. 



"Two hour elective to be taken in one of the B.S. departments other than the de- 
partment of Physical Education. If student takes a three hour course, only two of the 
three hours shall count in credit. Courses elected must be from those approved for 
B.A. credit. 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 65 

Students desiring to teach are advised to fulfill the requirements of 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the certificate in the 
state in which they expect to teach. For students preparing to teach in 
the high school, 15 semester hours of Education may be credited toward 
the Bachelor of Arts degree; for those preparing to teach in the ele- 
mentary grades, 21 hours of Education are allowed. 

Regulations Concerning B.S. Elective Hours 

Under the restrictions noted below a certain number of hours of 
elective work chosen from the departments which give work leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degrees may be credited toward the Bachelor 
of Arts degree. The courses chosen must be from those approved for 
Bachelor of Arts credit by the Curriculum Committee and the Faculty 
Council. 

Also students in one B.S. department may take courses in another 
B.S. department subject to the restrictions listed below. 

1. Beginning in 1948-1949 any course taught by a B.S. department 
shall count toward the maximum number of B.S. hours to be credited 
toward the B.A. or B.S. degree. 

2. Students taking the B.A. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation not more than 12 hours of B.S. elective work if taken in one 
B.S. department; not more than 15 if taken in two B.S. departments; 
and not more than 18 if taken in more than two B.S. departments. 

3. Students taking the B.S. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation a maximum of 9 hours of free elective work in other B.S. 
departments. 

These limits do not apply to the Interdepartmental Major in Rec- 
reation. 

The courses chosen for B.A. credit must be selected from the fol- 
lowing: 

Approved Business Education courses: Business Education 211, 212, 
311-312, 13 321-322-423, 331, 332, 335, 336, 345, 351, 428, S431, 433, 445 
and 446. Courses 211-212 and 433 are the only courses available to 
students below the junior level. 

Approved Home Economics courses are Home Economics 101, 213, 
300, 302, 305, 315, 325, 331, 335, 341, 351, 353, 355, 412, 421, and 
301 (limited to Art majors). 

Approved Music courses are: Music 100, 101-102, 127, 150, 201-202, 
111-112, 211-212, 231-232, 301-302, 327, 328, 329, 338, 355-356, applied 
Music courses to which the student may be admitted in accordance with 
the School of Music rules. 



"Shorthand 321-322-423 may not be taken for less than 9 semester hours if the 
credit is to be applied toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. 



6Q Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Health 343 (for B.S. in Nursing majors) may be taken by A.B. 
students preparing to be laboratory technicians with the understanding 
that it count on the 12-18 hour limit of B.S. courses. 

The approved courses in the Physical Education Department are: 
Physical Education 241, 334, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 
345, 346, 354, 355, 356. 

Certain departmental regulations govern the choice of any of the 
above courses chosen by the individual student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

I. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

See School of Music, page 175. 

II. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The minimum general education and major field requirements for 
the Bachelor of Science in Home Economics degree are: 

S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

Science 12 

Social Sciences 14 12 

Foreign Language (one) 12 

Art 101 3 

Home Economics 42 

Electives 27 

Physical Education 2 

"122 

The Department of Home Economics offers several curricula, organ- 
ized to meet specialized subject matter interests and the requirements 
of official groups responsible for the accrediting of professional training 
courses. 

These several majors are: Teacher Training; Institution Economics; 
General Home Economics; Clothing and Textiles; Foods and Nutrition; 
Housing; Child Development and Home Relationships. 

The Core Curriculum for these several majors consists of 3 s.h. in 
each of the following fields, Clothing, Foods, Home Furnishings, Child 
Development; 2 s.h. in Family Relationships; and 4 s.h. in Home Man- 
agement; total 18 s.h. 

14 Six of these hours must be History 101-102 ; the remaining six in Economics and /or 
Sociology. 

15 A minimum of 204 quality points is required. 



Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 



67 



The particular Home Economics courses required in each major 
include: 

Courses listed in the Home Economics Core Curriculum. 

Courses required by certain accrediting agencies. 

Courses best suited to the individual needs of the students. 

The courses making up the 27 hours of elective work include: 

Courses other than Home Economics courses which are required by 
accrediting agencies and which do not fit into any other categories 
listed above. 

Courses required as prerequisites for required courses. 

Free elective courses. 



III. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Physical Education offers two curricula which 
allow a choice between (1) preparation for teaching Physical Educa- 
tion; and (2) a course emphasizing the Dance in Education. The fresh- 
man-sophomore requirements for these two curricula are identical. 

Freshman- Sophomore Requirements: 



Freshman Year S.H. 

English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Biology 101-102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Health 101 and elective 6 

Physical Education 111-112. . 1 



Sophomore Year S.H. 



English 211-212 

Chemistry 101-102 or 

103-104 

"Foreign Language , 

Psychology 221-222 

Physical Education 241 

Elective 

Physical Education 211-212 



31 31 

Junior-Senior Requirements : 

Teacher Education 

Junior Year S.H. Senior Year S.H. 

Biology 271 3 Biology 277, 378 3 3 

Physical Education 351, 352 3 2 Sociology 321, 326 3 3 

Physical Education 359-360 . . 2 2 Physical Education 461-462 . . 2 2 

Physical Education 376 3 Physical Education 463, 464. 2 2 

Health 236 1 Physical Education 465, 476. 2 2 

Home Economics 213 3 Physical Education 468 2 

Education 3 3 Physical Education 469-470 . . 1 1 

Elective and Health 367 3 2 Elective 2 

Physical Educational Practice 



15 lo 



15 15 



"Continuation of the one chosen in the first year. 



68 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



The Dance in Education 

Junior Year S.H. Senior Year 

Biology 271 3 Biology 277, 378 

Physical Education 348 3 Physical Education 345-346 

Physical Education 351 3 Physical Education 354 .. . 

Physical Education 359-360 . . 2 2 Physical Education 461-462 

Physical Education 376 3 Physical Education 463 . 

Health 236, 367 1 2 Physical Education 465 . 

Education 3 3 Physical Education 468 . 

Sociology 321 3 Physical Education 469-470 

Elective 2 Electives and Sociology 326 



S.H. 
3 3 



. 2 



15 15 



15 15 



In addition to the hours of academic credit, physical education major 
students are required to complete the following hours in physical edu- 
cation activities: 

Freshman Year — First Semester: Physical Education 111 (hockey, 
soccer, swimming, gymnastics, stunts), 5 hours weekly, % s.h. Second 
Semester: Physical Education 112 (gymnastics, stunts, swimming, mod- 
ern dance, softball, tennis), 6 hours weekly, % s.h. 

Sophomore Year — First Semester: Physical Education 211 (golf, 
volleyball, speedball, swimming, social dance, basketball), 6 hours 
weekly, % s.h. Second Semester: Physical Education 212 (badminton, 
folk dance, archery, modern dance, clog and tap dance), 7 hours weekly, 
V z s.h. 

Junior Year — First Semester: Physical Education 359 (hockey, soc- 
cer, basketball coaching and officiating, tennis, gymnastic teaching, 
marching and apparatus), 6 hours weekly, 2 s.h.; Physical Education 
351 — as laboratory hours — (child rhythms, English country dance, 
stunts). Second Semester: Physical Education 360 (folk dance teach- 
ing, intramurals, marching and apparatus, modern dance, camp leader- 
ship theory, American country dance, track and field, softball coaching 
and officiating), 8 hours weekly, 2 s.h. Included in the Camp Program 
in June of the junior year: volleyball coaching and officiating, water- 
front supervision, swimming methods, recreational sports, boating and 
canoeing, practical camp leadership. 

Senior Year — First Semester: Physical Education 469 (sports offici- 
ating and coaching, modern dance), 5 hours weekly, 1 s.h. Second 
Semester: Physical Education 470 (sports officiating and coaching, fes- 
tivals, bowling, squash, fencing, handball, lacrosse, golf methods), 5 
hours weekly, 1 s.h. 



Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 69 

IV. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Business Education and Secretarial Administra- 
tion offers three sequences providing variations in the junior-senior 
years which make it possible for students to prepare for various kinds 
of business and teaching positions. 

The minimum requirements for a degree are completion of 122 hours 
with 204 quality points including the specific courses listed. 

Freshman-Sophomore Requirements (for all sequences): 

Freshman Year S.H. Sophomore Year S.H. 

English 101-102 6 English 211-212 6 

History 101-102 6 Economics 211-212 6 

Foreign Language" 6 Economics 233-234 6 

Science 18 or Mathematics 19 6 Geography 237 and History 

Hygiene 101 and Elective 18 6 213 20 6 

Physical Education 1 Foreign Language 17 or Elective. 6 

— Business Education 211-212 ... 2 

31 Physical Education 1 

33 

Junior-Senior Requirements: 

Three sequences are offered. The courses in each of these sequences 
are divided into groups from each of which a stated number of semester 
hours must be chosen. 

A. Secretarial Sequences : Office Skills, 16 hours (including 2 hrs. in 
typewriting); Management and Accounting, 6 hrs.; Economics, Psy- 
chology, and Retailing, 15 hrs. 

B. Business Teacher Sequence: Office Skills, 12 hours (including 2 
hrs. in typewriting) ; Management and Accounting, 9 hrs. ; Economics 
and Retailing, 9 hrs.; Professional courses, 18 hrs. 

C. Distributive Education (Retailing) Sequence: Retailing and re- 
lated courses, 18 hrs.; Economics and Sociology, 12 hrs.; Professional 
courses, as required by the State Department of Public Instruction. 



17 A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must con- 
tinue a foreign language offered for entrance. 

18 A student planning to specialize in Retailing should take Chemistry 101-102 and 
Art 101. 

"Students electing mathematics should take Mathematics 105-106. 

20 Students electing History 211 may substitute History 212. 



70 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

V. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

A. This course leads to the attainment of the academic degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and the professional degree of Regis- 
tered Nurse. 

The work of the first two and one-half years is taken at the Col- 
lege. After this, two and one-half years must be spent in a nursing 
school approved by the College. 

Freshman Year S.H. Junior Year SH. 

Biology 101-102 6 First Semester Only 

Chemistry 101-102 6 Biology 387 3 

English 101-102 6 Health 101 3 

Foreign Language 21 6 Health 343 4 

History 101-102 6 Health 345 2 

Physical Education 1 Psychology 221 3 

31 15 

Sophomore Year S.H. 

Biology 275-376 6 

Chemistry 225, 326 6 

English 211-212 6 

Sociology 321-322 6 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 1 



31 



21 Since only one year of foreign 
language is required in college it must 
be a continuation of a foreign langu- 
age offered for admission. 



B. For Ex-Service Women who are Graduate Nurses. For a limited 
time the college is offering a two-year course designed for graduate 
nurses who served in the army and navy medical corps and who wish 
to obtain a college degree. Nurses who are graduates of approved hos- 
pitals and who followed their profession in a civilian capacity during 
World War II are also eligible. Details in regard to this course may 
be obtained by writing the Secretary of Admissions. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts 
is the completion of 128 semester hours with 214 quality points. The 
hours required must include: 

S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

Social Sciences — History 101-102: the remaining six hours may be in 

history, government, economics, or sociology 12 

Natural Science 6 



Requirements for the Degree op Bachelor op Fine Arts 71 

"Foreign Language (must be a continuation of language taken in 

secondary school) 6 

Philosophy 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 2 

Major Requirements for the Following Sequences with a Major 
in Art: 

Art Education: Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349; Design— Art 
101, 224, 227, 331, 336, 377; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 342, 364, 
383. Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239; Art Education— Art 354; 
Psychology 221-222; Education 350, 461, elective 3 semester hours; Art 
and related courses approved by the adviser 5 semester hours. 

Costume Design and Fashion Illustration: Art History — Art 103, 325, 
330, 349; Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 322, 324, 327, 359; Drawing and 
Painting— Art 241, 342, 364, 383; Home Economics 331, 301; Physics 
209 ; Art and related courses approved by the adviser 12 semester hours ; 
Art 450, 469. 

Design for Advertising : Art History — Art 103, 325, 366, 357 and one 
of the following: 329, 339, 350; Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 327, 379; 
Drawing and Painting — Art 241, 326, 342, 351, 364, 383; Business 
Education 345; Physics 209; Art and related courses approved by the 
adviser 15 semester hours; Art 450-469. 

History and Interpretation of Art: Art History — Art 103, 325, 330, 
341, 349, 350, 387, 469, elective 6 semester hours; Design— Art 101, 227, 
332; Drawing and Painting — Art 342. Recommended courses in other 
fields: History 211, 353, 354; Languages — Greek, Latin, German, or 
Romance Languages — 6 semester hours; Physics 209-310; Sociology 
326, 328. 

Industrial Design: Art History — Art 103, 325, 349, 357; Design — Art 
101, 224, 227, 331, 359, 375 ; Drawing and Painting— Art 373 ; Ceramics 
and Sculpture— Art 239, 344; Physics 209; Mathematics 101, 102 or 103- 
104; Business Education 345; Economics 329; Art and related courses 
approved by the adviser 13 semester hours; Art 450, 469. 

Interior Design: Art History — Art 103, 325, 330, 349, 357, 366; De- 
sign—Art 101, 224, 227, 332, 338, 359 ; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 
373, 383; Sociology, 326; Art and related courses approved by the 
adviser 18 semester hours; Art 450, 469. 



22 If a new language is begun, 12 semester hours must be completed. 



72 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Painting: Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349; Design— Art 101, 
224; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326, 328, 342, 351, 360, 364, 381, 
383; Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239, 344; Art and related courses 
approved by the adviser 14 semester hours; Art 450-469. 

Textile Design: Art History— Art 103, 325, 341, 349; Design— Art 
101, 224, 227, 359; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326; Home Eco- 
nomics 341, 421; Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104 and 6 semester hours of 
advanced chemistry courses; Physics 209; Art and related courses ap- 
proved by the adviser 9 semester hours; Art 450-469. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

See Graduate School of the University of North Carolina, Woman's 
College Division, page 195. 



VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Class Chairmen and Academic Advisers 

There is a class chairman for each of the four classes. The Fresh- 
man Chairman gives her entire time to each freshman class. The other 
three act in an advisory capacity to members of a specified class for 
the entire three years after the freshman year. There are special 
advisers for small groups of freshmen and sophomores, and the heads 
of departments advise the juniors and seniors majoring in their 
particular departments. In this way each student has individual advice 
concerning her academic work throughout her entire college course, 
under the direction of members of the faculty acquainted with her 
needs and interests. 

The Academic and Personnel Committee 

Guidance of students in academic and extracurricular matters is 
administered through the Academic and Personnel Committee. This 
committee is composed of the four class chairmen and five other mem- 
bers of the faculty, with the Dean of Women as chairman. The com- 
mittee acts as a clearing agency between the faculty and students in 
academic matters. 

REGISTRATION 

Freshman Week 

To aid new students in becoming adjusted to college life as quickly 
as possible, the College has established Freshman Week. The program 
of this week includes mental and physical measurements, pre-registra- 
tion counseling, special lectures on student traditions, library tours, and 
social gatherings, in addition to the registration for courses. This pro- 
gram begins with a meeting of all new students in Aycock Auditorium 
at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, September 13. Freshman and transfer stu- 
dents — all new students except Commercial students — are required to be 
present at this and all other appointments of the program of Freshman 
Week. 

Registration Dates 

Freshmen and Commercial students will register Thursday, Sep- 
tember 15, 1949. Third and fourth-year students will consult advisers 
Thursday, September 15, and will complete registration Friday, Sep- 
tember 16. Second-year students will register Friday, September 16, 
1949. 

A fine of $1.00 a day is charged for late registration. 

73 



74 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

General Regulations 

Every candidate for a Bachelor's degree must conform to the 
residence requirement of this College. 

The student herself is responsible for fulfilling all requirements for 
the degree for which she is registered. 

Not later than May 1 of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years, 
each student shall hand to the Registrar a copy of her program of 
study for the coming year. This program must have the official endorse- 
ment of the student's adviser and her class chairman. 

Without the permission of her class chairman no student may 
register for more than 16 hours of work in either semester except 
under the following regulations: Students may register for two half- 
hour lessons a week in applied music (without credit) in addition to 
their regular work so long as they are doing satisfactory work in all 
courses. 

Requests for permission to register for more than 16 hours should 
be handed to the class chairman at the dates to be announced in the 
Carolinian. All permissions for extra work are subject to the approval 
of the College physician. 

No regular College student may carry less than 12 hours of work. 

Change of Course. Changes in course should not be made after 
registration except in unusual cases. For one week after registration 
a student may make necessary changes by presenting to the Registrar 
a change-of-course card signed by her adviser and her class chairman. 

Students are not permitted to enroll in a course for credit later than 
one week after registration. 

No student is officially dropped from a course until she has presented 
to the Registrar a change-of-course card signed by her adviser and 
her class chairman. 

A course dropped after December 1 or after April 20 shall be re- 
corded as a failure. 

Credits. No student may receive credit for any course for which 
she has not officially registered and presented to the instructor a card 
of admission from the Registrar. 

No credit will be given for correspondence or extension work taken 
while a student is in residence at this College. 

Auditing Courses. Auditing a course is allowed under the follow- 
ing conditions: 

1. No student may audit more than one course a semester. 



Academic Regulations 75 

2. To audit a course, a student: 

(a) must have the permission of her class chairman and the in- 
structor whose course is to be audited. 

(b) must register for the course as prescribed by the Registrar. 

3. A student auditing a course shall be required to meet the same 
attendance requirements as one taking the course for credit. 

4. An instructor may request that a student be dropped from a course 
if attendance requirements or other conditions set by him are not 
satisfactorily met. 

Classification. At the beginning of the college year the following 
minimum semester hours credit (exclusive of required physical educa- 
tion) shall be required for the classification indicated: 

Seniors 84 semester hours 

Juniors 50 semester hours 

Sophomores 21 semester hours 

On recommendation of the appropriate class chairman, the Academic 
and Personnel Committee may modify the foregoing regulations in the 
case of a meritorious student. 

Entrance Deficiencies. Graduates of approved high schools who 
present the required fifteen units may be admitted to the College. To be 
admitted as a candidate for a degree, the student must meet the specific 
requirements laid down for that degree. If there are deficiencies, they 
must be made good before the student may be classed as a sophomore. 

Quality Points. Every candidate for a degree must present at least 
204 quality points on the 120 required hours. x If more than 120 hours 
are taken, a credit ratio of 1.7 must still be maintained. The points are 
computed by giving the following values to the grades now in use: 

A = 4 quality points for each hour of credit. 

B = 3 quality points for each hour of credit. 

C=2 quality points for each hour of credit. 

D = l quality point for each hour of credit. 

Residence Requirements. Not fewer than 42 of the last 60 semester 
hours required for the B.A. or the B.S. degree shall be done at the 
Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. Of these 42 
semester hours, at least 30 shall be done in the regular sessions of the 
College from September to June. In general, 12 of these hours shall be 
devoted to subjects in the department of the student's major interest. 

Students who have successfully completed three years of work in a 
standard college and whose credits have been accepted by the College 
are required to do 30 rather than 42 hours in residence. 



transfer students entering the junior class must maintain an average of at least 
C, a credit ratio of 2. 



76 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Summer Session and Extension Credits. Students desiring to ap- 
ply toward their degrees work taken at the summer sessions of other 
colleges must confer with the Registrar of this College for permission 
to take such courses. No credit is assured unless a course has been so 
approved. 

Summer session students (other than those who have matriculated 
during the regular year of the College) planning to apply their sum- 
mer session work toward a degree must file a record of their entrance 
credits with the Registrar of the College previous to matriculation. In 
general, students who wish to apply summer session work toward a 
degree shall fulfill the prerequisites laid down in the regular catalogue. 

Not more than one-fourth of the requirement for a degree may be 
done by extension work, and not more than eight semester hours of 
extension work may be done in any one year. 

Extension students desiring to apply the credit earned toward a 
degree must conform to the entrance requirements of the College. All 
questions of credit shall be referred to the Registrar and the Com- 
mittee on Advanced Standing. 

Examinations. Every student is required to take an examination, if 
one is given, on every course for which she is registered. No examina- 
tions may be given except during the three regular examination periods 
of the year: September 14 and at the end of each semester. Examina- 
tions for the removal of conditions and for proficiency examinations 
will be held on September 14, 1949. 

Requests for re-examinations must be made not later than the fol- 
lowing times: 

September 1, for re-examinations to be taken on September 14. 

January 14, for re-examinations to be taken at the end of the first 
semester. 

May 14, for re-examinations to be taken at the end of the second 
semester. 

Blanks on which to apply for September re-examinations are sent 
from the Registrar's office in July. In January and May the student 
must file with her class chairman requests for re-examinations to be 
given at the close of the first and second semesters respectively. 

An E may be removed by re-examination before the beginning of the 
corresponding semester of the next year in which the student is in 
residence. If not removed, an E automatically becomes an F. At the dis- 
cretion of the instructor, an E received in the first half of a year course 
may also be removed by obtaining a grade of C or better in the last 
half of the course. Students receiving a grade of F must repeat the 
course in order to receive credit. 



Academic Regulations 77 

The work for which an / has been given must be completed before 
the beginning of the corresponding semester of the next year in which 
the student is in residence; otherwise, the / automatically becomes an F. 

Proficiency Examinations. Full credit will be given for passing a 
proficiency examination in any course listed in the catalogue. Not more 
than 12 hours earned by proficiency examinations shall be credited to- 
ward graduation. A grade of D is passing but quality points will be 
given only for a grade of C or better. 

Proficiency examinations will be given during the three regular ex- 
amination periods. 

Written requests for proficiency examinations should be mailed to 
the Chairman of the Proficiency Examinations Committee at least two 
weeks prior to examination week. 

Report: A report of the student's work is mailed to the parent or 
guardian at the end of each semester. A report is also sent to each 
student at the end of the first semester. The reports are based upon 
the following system of marking: 

A — Excellent. 

B— Good. 

C — Average. 

D — Lowest passing mark. 

E — Conditioned. 

F — Failure. 

/ — Incomplete. 

Students must attain a grade of at least D to pass in any course. 
Grade E indicates that the student is conditioned, but will be given 
another opportunity to remove the deficiency. An F may be removed 
only be repeating the course. 

Attendance. Excuses for all absences caused by illness must be se- 
cured from the College physicians, as explained on page 36. Students in 
the upper classes with an average of C or better for work done during 
the previous semester are permitted unexcused absences to the number 
of credit hours which they are carrying, the absences to be distributed 
pro rata according to the number of hours credit in a course. 

Freshmen are allowed no unexcused absences the first semester. 

For more detailed information about absences, each student should 
read carefully the regulations governing all absences, which are set 
forth in detail in the booklet containing the Constitution, By-Laws, and 
Regulations of the Student Government Association (the Students' 
Handbook). 



78 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Town students ill at their homes should communicate with the Col- 
lege physician before returning to the campus, and should report at 
the Infirmary within 72 hours after their return, bringing a certificate 
of professional attendance signed by their home physician. 

Dean's List. Two groups of students are eligible for the Dean's 
List. In September, seniors who have been in residence the preceding 
semester are eligible. In January, seniors and juniors who have been 
in residence the preceding semester are eligible. Eligible students are 
placed upon the Dean's List if they have made at least a B average 
and if they have received no grade lower than C for the immediately 
preceding semester, provided they are not otherwise disqualified. For 
further special conditions, exceptions, and responsibilities see the 
Students' Handbook. 

Graduation With Honors. Honors are awarded to seniors at com- 
mencement. For summa cum laude a minimum average of 3.90 is re- 
quired; for magna cum laude, 3.60; for cum laude, 3.30. Averages are 
computed on the basis of those courses which have been taken for credit 
and which have been completed by the end of the first semester of the 
senior year. Any senior is eligible for honors who at the end of the 
first semester has completed at least forty-five hours of work (not in- 
cluding hours for which credit has been received by proficiency ex- 
aminations) in residence at the Woman's College and who has not re- 
ceived a grade of F. 

Exclusion from College. During the first semester that a student 
is enrolled, she must pass at least six hours of work to remain in col- 
lege. Every semester after the first, a student must pass at least nine 
hours to remain in college or to be readmitted. This regulation may be 
waived at the discretion of the Academic and Personnel Committee. 
This regulation does not take into account proposed summer school 
work. 

Transcript of Record. Only one full statement of work and credit 
recorded for each student registered will be furnished without charge. 
Additional copies will be made only on receipt of a fee of one dollar 
($1.00), or 50 cents for a single summer session record, to cover 
clerical expenses involved. 



VII. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

First semester courses are usually given odd numbers. 

Second semester courses are usually given even numbers. 

An r after a course number indicates that the course may be given 
either semester. 

An s before a course number indicates that the course is given only 
during the summer. 

A semester hour credit corresponds, unless otherwise stated, to an 
hour class period week through one semester. 

A year course, indicated by hyphenated numbers, must be completed 
before credit will be allowed 

Courses of Grade I are numbered 100-199 and are primarily for 
freshmen and sophomores; those of Grade II, 200-299, primarily for 
sophomores; those of Grade III, 300-399, primarily for juniors and 
seniors. Grade IV, 400-499, indicates courses open only to seniors and 
graduate students. Grade V, 500-599, graduate students only. 

For necessary adjustments in grading, see page 64. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Ivy (Head of the Department) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Thrush, Courtney, Jastrow, Hardin, Williams; 
Instructors Barksdale, Brady; Curator Church. 

DESIGN 
lOlr. Design 

Basic course in the fundamentals of design from the following 
approaches: art structure, free expression, functional, geometric, and 
abstract. Through many problems in various media, creative ability as 
well as intelligent choice and judgment in the use of art will have 
opportunity for development. Required of art majors. One lecture and 
six studio hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.50. Staff. 

224. Color 

A continuation of Art lOlr with emphasis on color. A study of color 
theories and the decorative and structural use of color in creative prob- 
lems. Required of all art majors. Prerequisite, Art 101. One lecture and 
six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy, Miss Hardin. 

79 



80 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

227. Lettering 

A study is made of the historical background, fundamental principles 
and the essentials of good lettering. Application of this study through 
suitable lettering problems develop skill and creative ability. One lecture 
and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

322. Costume Design and Fashion Illustration 

A basic study of creative design in costume, and an introduction to 
various media used in commercial fashion illustration. Prerequisites, 
Art 101, 224, 241' One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Barksdale. 

323. Interior Design 

Creative work in interior design based on the controlling factors of 
function, the inherent qualities of material and contemporary ways of 
construction. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$1.00. Miss Brady. 

324. Costume Design and Illustration 

A continuation of 322 with emphasis on perfecting techniques and 
original composition; a broadening of the field to include all forms 
of dress — sports, evening, business, etc. (for men, women and children) 
— also costuming for the theatre. Problems in both two dimensional 
design (illustration on paper) and three dimensional design (draping 
model or mannikin). Prerequisites, Art 101, 224, 241, 364, 322. One 
lecture, six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Barksdale. 

327. Design for Advertising and Display 

A course for students interested in advertising art. Creative work 
in commercial advertising, window display and the art of the book. Pre- 
requisites, Art 101, 103, 224' One lecture and six studio hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Courtney. 

331. Industrial Design 

Problems using a variety of materials executed with emphasis on 
design and suitability for mass production. Furniture design and con- 
struction, metal work, weaving, and related processes are studied. Pre- 
requisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241- One lecture and six studio hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Miss Hardin. 

332. Architectural Design 

Creative work in architectural design based on the controlling factors 
of design, function, the inherent qualities of material and the structural 
principles of architecture. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241- One 
lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $1.00. 



Department of Art 81 

336r. Introduction to Crafts 

Problems using a variety of materials including wood, clay, metal 
and various textile processes are executed. Prerequisite, junior standing. 
Four studio hoxirs either semester. Credit, two semester hour. Studio 
fee, $1.00. Miss Hardin, Miss Williams. 

338. Perspective and Architectural Rendering 

Problems involving the use of various media and instruments are 
used to develop skill and knowledge necessary for making pictorial 
representations and perspective renderings of exterior and interior 
architectural designs. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 2U1, 373. One lecture 
and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Brady. 

359. Textile Design 

A study to acquaint the student with techniques in which new ma- 
terials and textiles are important. Emphasis on structural design in 
weaving, with some attention to design as in silk-screen printing and 
block printing. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 22^. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Miss Hardin. 

375. Industrial Design 

A continuation of Art 331 with greater emphasis being given to the 
technical problems involved. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 22 A, 2^1, 331. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Miss Hardin. 

377. Design for the Theatre 

Problems, materials, and techniques related to design for the theatre. 
Elevations and model sets for various types and period productions 
will be planned and executed. Prerequisite, Art 101. One lecture and 
six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Courtney. 

379. The Art of the Book 

The making of a complete book, including creative problems in lay- 
out, illustration, and various techniques and processes. Prerequisites, 
Art 101, 103, 22 Jf, 241. One lecture and six studio hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

450r-469r. Co-ordinating Course: Studio Problems 

Advanced work in any phase of work offered by the department. 
Open to art majors who have shown superior ability and who have 
completed eighteen semester hours of art credit. May be taken only 
during the senior year and with the approval of the head of the de- 
partment and the instructor with whom the students will work. Three 



82 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

conference or lecture hours and a minimum of six studio hours, either 
semester. Credit, three or six semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00 to 
$5.00. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



DRAWING AND PAINTING 
241. Drawing 

Fundamental principles of drawing and composition. Experimental 
studies in the studio and out-of-doors, using various media. Required 
of all art majors. One lecture, six studio hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

326. Wood and Linoleum Block Printing 

A study through creative problems of the techniques of wood cutting, 
and wood engraving. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 22U, 24-1. One lecture 
and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

328. Etching 

A study through creative problems of the processes of etching, dry- 
point, aquatint, and soft ground etching. Consideration of the history 
of prints and print-making. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 22U, 2^1. One 
lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

342. Painting 

A continuation of Art 241 with attention to problems in color. 
Opportunity for experimental studies in the technique of oil painting. 
Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241. One lecture and six studio hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Thrush. 

351. Lithography 

A continued study of composition in black and white, using the 
lithograph stone as a medium of expression. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 
241. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Courtney. 

360. Painting 

Experimental problems in form, volume, space, and light expressed 
in color. Still life and landscape subjects are executed in both water 
color and oil. Prerequisites, Art 101, 241, 342. One lecture and six 
studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Miss Barksdale. 



Department of Art 83 

364. Figure Drawing and Painting 

The first half of this course is devoted to figure construction in 
black and white, and the latter half is devoted to problems in color. 
Prerequisites, Art 101, 241, 34-2. One lecture and six studio hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Barks- 
dale. 

373. Mechanical Drawing 

Designed to equip the student to produce and read working draw- 
ings and plans such as may be used in industry and by interior 
designers. The theory of projection, the use of scales, and the technique 
of projectioning. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 241. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Miss Brady. 

s381. Painting 

A study of the problems encountered in landscape painting. The 
handling of form, volume, space, light, and color; and the organization 
of composition emphasizing the theories, methods, and techniques of 
post-impressionism, cubism, and other recent trends in painting. Stu- 
dents will work directly from different types of subject matter out-of- 
doors in painting compositions in both oil and water color. This course 
will be given at Beaufort, North Carolina, for one month during the 
summer. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241, 342, or the equivalent. 
Seven lecture and thirty-four studio hours. Permission to register for 
this course must be secured from the instructor. Credit four semester 
hours. Mr. Ivy. 

383. Painting 

Practical experience with the various techniques of water-color 
painting; transparent, gouache, egg tempera, and other closely related 
media. Prerequisites, Art 101, 224, 241 . One lecture and six studio 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Courtney. 

HISTORY AND INTERPRETATION OF ART 

103r. Introduction to Art 

The nature and materials of art, and the relation of art to man 
and his physical and cultural environment. The chief purpose of this 
course is to establish a basis for intelligent appreciation. Required of all 
art majors. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

325. Modern Art 

The origin and development of the important art movements and 
theories beginning with the nineteenth century and continuing through 



84 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

the present time. The work of the leaders in various movements will 
be studied. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Mr. Ivy. 

329. Primitive Art 

Outstanding examples of the arts of prehistoric and primitive cul- 
tures of various continents will be studied. Prerequisite, junior stand- 
ing. One lecture, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Studio fee, 
$1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

330. Ancient Art 

Art of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and pre-Hellenic art of the 
Mediterranean. Greek and Roman art, with emphasis on the cultural 
background as well as the structural principles of Greek art and their 
amalgamation with the Roman spirit, which underlie European arts 
of later periods. Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss 
Jastrow. 

334. Arts of East Asia 

The development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts 
in India, China, and Japan from antiquity through the nineteenth 
century will be studied. Attention will be given to the social, economic, 
and religious background and to the relations with Western art. Pre- 
requisite, junior or senior standing. Three lecture hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

339. Early Arts of the Americas 

An introduction to pre-Columbian and Spanish colonial arts. Monu- 
ments of the Mayan and other past civilizations and the early period 
of Latin American countries. Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. 
One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Studio fee, 1.00. 
Miss Jastrow. 

341. Arts of the Middle Ages 

Early Christian and Byzantine art, with emphasis on the background 
of ancient art and culture. Romanesque and Gothic art as expression of 
the cultural and religious development of the Middle Ages, with 
emphasis on the formative artistic principles. Prerequisite, junior or 
senior standing. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

345r. Masterpieces of Art 

Selected art works of various periods for students in all depart- 
ments, as part of their general education. Each lesson is devoted to the 
understanding of a single work, its historical background and its 
aesthetic principles. Elective open to juniors and seniors, and to sopho- 
mores by permission of the instructor. One hour, either semester. Credit 
one semester hour. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 



Department of Art 85 

349. Arts of the Renaissance 

Development of the arts within the cultural background of the Ren- 
aissance, with emphasis on the works of the outstanding artists and their 
contributions to later periods. Architecture, sculpture, painting, and 
minor arts. Elective open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores 
on permission of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

350. Western European Arts of the Renaissance 

Introduction to the development of the arts in Western Europe since 
the late Gothic period and under the influence of the Italian Renais- 
sance. Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. One hour, second se- 
mester. Credit, one semester hour. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

353. Arts of the United States 

The development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor 
arts in the United States will be studied. The influence of European art 
and of the American environment will be given consideration. Prere- 
quisite, junior or senior standing. Three lecture hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

357. History of Architecture 

A study of the architectural forms and the chief historic styles with 
emphasis on the relation of architecture to the civilization which pro- 
duced it. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $1.00. Miss Brady. 

366. History of Furniture 

Period styles of furniture and interior design and the relation of 
these to the life of the time. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Brady. 

387. Introduction to Museum Work 

A study will be made of the function of a museum in life today. 
Seminar and laboratory problems will emphasize the fundamentals of 
current procedures in the selection, preservation, and presentation of 
art works. Prerequisites, senior standing and the permission of the head 
of the department. Two lecture or seminar, two laboratory hours. Credit, 
three semester hours, first semester. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Jastrow. 

CERAMICS AND SCULPTURE 
239. Modeling 

A general course in the preparation of clay, designing and modeling 
animal and figure compositions in relief and in the round, ceramic 
sculpture, and the surfacing of clay work. One lecture and six studio 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. 
Miss Hardin. 



86 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

340. Pottery 

A study of the design and the processes of pottery making: primi- 
tive coil method, use of potter's wheel, two- and three-piece mold cast- 
ings, preparation, application, and fusing of glazes. Prerequisites, Art 
101, 103, 239. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. 

344. Sculpture 

A creative study of the sculptural and plastic problems encountered 
in various sculptural media — terra cotta, stone, wood, plaster — and the 
relationship of sculpture to architecture through creative prolbems; 
the making of piece molds and casting in clay. Prerequisites, Art 101, 
103, 239. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Creddt, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. 

ART EDUCATION 

333. Art Education in the Elementary School 

A study of the aims and the philosophy of art education in the ele- 
mentary school and of the art curricula of public schools. Opportunity 
for observation of the elementary school art program in progress will 
be arranged. Prerequisite, Art 101. Two lecture and two studio hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Williams. 

354. Art Education in the Secondary School 

The aims of art in the public school, the curricula of the creative 
program in schools for kindergarten through high school, and the selec- 
tion, preparation, and use of teaching materials. Observation and 
criticism of children's creative work, combined with the planning of a 
course of study for a typical public school. Prerequisite, eighteen se- 
mester hours of art. Two lecture and two studio hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Williams. 

ASTRONOMY 

See Department of Mathematics, page 150. 



Department of Biology 87 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professors Givler, (Head of the Department), Shaftes- 
bury; Associate Professors Coldwell, Ingraham, Williams, 
Love, Thiel; Assistant Professors Ritchie, Gangstad, 
Harpster, Dawley, Rogers; Instructor Anderton; Assist- 
ants Wooten, Hamrick, Osborne, Thomas, Twiggs. 

biology 

2 101-102. General Biology 

A study of selected types of plants and animals, designed to acquaint 
the student with the structure, activities, and life relations of organ- 
isms. Biological principles are stressed. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00 a semester. Miss Coldwell, Mr. Givler, Mr. Shaftesbury, Miss 
Ingraham, Mr. Thiel, Miss Gangstad, Miss Harpster, Miss Dawley, Mr. 
Rogers, Miss Anderton, Miss Hamrick, Miss Osborne. 

492. Heredity and Eugenics 

The history and significance of the theory of organic evolution; 
Mendelism, with modern trends in genetics; contributions of genetics to 
the improvement of mankind. Lectures, reading in text and reference 
books, with written reports. Prerequisites, nine hours of biological 
science. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Givler. 

449. Co-ordinating Course: The History and Principles of Biology 

Origins of biology, and outlines of main trends into special fields. 
Historical and philosophical relations of the subject. Principles of ele- 
mentary courses reviewed. Required by the department of all senior 
biology majors. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Givler. 

499r. Biological Problems 

Individual studies in botany, zoology, or other fields. The laboratory 
work and reading of the student will be guided by a weekly conference 
with the instructor in charge. A written report will be submitted each 
semester. Laboratory work and conferences are arranged. Credit, three 
or more semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 a credit hour. 



'On leave of absence. 

Specially qualified students may enter General Botany 221 or Plant Morphology 222 
or General Zoology 241 and 342, upon presentation of their high school biology note 
book, if accepted after an interview with the head of the Department of Biology. 



88 Woman's College— University of North Carolina 

BOTANY 

221. General Botany 

A survey of the life of seed plants with special emphasis on the 
relations between structure and function. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Labor atoy fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel, Miss Gangstad, 
Mr. Rogers. 

222. Plant Morphology 

A study of the structure, life history, reproduction, and relation- 
ships of selected types from the thallophytes to the spermatophytes. 
Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. Two lecture hours and three laboratory 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Mr. Thiel, Miss Gangstad, Mr. Rogers. 

3 121r. Ornamental Plants 

Garden plants, their identification and ornamental value in land- 
scaping and interior decorations, their cultural requirements, methods 
of propagation, and the means of protecting them against insect and 
fungus pests. Designed primarily as a freshman elective. Three one- 
hour lectures or demonstrations per week. Credit, three semester hours. 
Fee, for demonstration material $1.00. Mr. Rogers. 

324. Local Flora 

Methods and principles of plant classification. The identification of 
flowering plants. Field trips. Prerequisites, Biology 101-102 and three 
additional semester hours in biological sciences. Two lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Rogers. 

325r. Histology and Anatomy 

The technique of preparing plant material for anatomical studies; 
methods of killing, imbedding, sectioning, and staining. The tissues are 
studied as to origin, differentiation, and organization. Prerequisite, 
Biology 221. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. 

327. Plant Ecology 

An elementary study of plants in their natural habitats and in rela- 
tion to the factors of environment such as soil, water, heat, light, and 
animals. Major emphasis will be placed upon the laws of plant distri- 
bution and the factors involved in plant associations. Prerequisites, 
Biology 101-102 and three additional semester hours in biological sciences. 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Rogers. 



3 This course can not be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



Department of Biology 89 

330. Diseases of Plants 

A study of the diseases of plants, their causal organisms, distribu- 
tion, and methods of prevention and control. Prerequisite, Biology 221 
or 222. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. 



ZOOLOGY 

241-342. General Zoology 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, ecology, distribution, 
and economic importance of animals, and of the general principles of 
animal biology. The laboratory work includes dissection of animals 
representing each of the principal groups. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 
or the equivalent. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Credit, 
six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Mr. Shaftesbury, 
Miss Harpster. 

247. Economic Ornithology 

Laboratory work and lectures on the classification, distribution, food 
relations, and conservation of birds. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 or 
the equivalent, and approval of the instructor. First semester. Credit 
one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

248. General Ornithology 

Chiefly field work on the identification and seasonal distribution of 
our native birds. Each student must be provided with opera glass or 
low-power field glass. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 or the equivalent. 
Second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. 

345. Animal Ecology 

A study of the relations of animals to the conditions in which they 
live, with special emphasis upon adaptations and conservation. The 
field work includes a general survey of the ponds and streams of the 
Greensboro region. Prerequisites, Biology 101-102 and three additional 
semester hours in biological sciences. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

351. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates 

A study of the comparative anatomy and evolution of the verte- 
brates, with dissection of a series of types. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 
Two lecture hours and six laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, four 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 



90 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

s353. Invertebrate Marine Zoology 

Offered for six weeks during the summer under the natural condi- 
tions of environment at the Carolina Marine Laboratory of Woman's 
College at Beaufort, North Carolina. For advanced college students, 
high school teachers, and others interested in professional biology. 
Lectures, laboratory and field study, and assigned readings. Chiefly on 
marine invertebrates, together with an introduction to the study of 
the vertebrates. Prerequisites, at least two years of college biology or 
extended teaching experience in biology. Credit, six semester hours. 
Since the enrollment is limited, application should be made before April 
1 to A. D. Shaftesbury, Acting Director, Carolina Marine Laboratory, 
Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, 
North Carolina. 

354. Vertebrate Embryology 

A comparative study of embryos of frog, chick, and mammal. Obser- 
vation of living material, practical histological technique, the study of 
serial sections, and dissection of the larger embryos and foetal mem- 
branes. Prerequisites, nine hours in biological .sciences. Two lecture 
hours and six laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, four semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

356. Parasitology 

An introductory study of the biology, life histories, distribution, and 
control of animal parasites, with special reference to those producing 
diseases of man and domestic animals. Prerequisites, Biology 241 and 
3U2 or Biology 281. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

211 y. Physiology of the Human Body 

A brief consideration of the structure and functions of each system 
of the human body. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. Two lecture hours 
and three laboratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Miss Coldwell, Miss Thomas. 

271. Mammalian Anatomy 

Human anatomy studied by means of skeletons, anatomical prepa- 
rations, models, and a mannikin. The cat is dissected. Prerequisite, 
Biology 101-102. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss 
Dawley, Miss Thomas. 



Department of Biology 91 

275-376. Anatomy and Physiology for Nurses 

An introductory study of the structure and physiological activities 
of the human body. Open only to candidates for degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. Such students may not elect Biology 271 and 277. 
Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. Two lecture hours and three laboratory 
hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 
a semester. Miss Williams, Miss Thomas. 

372. Histology and Organology 

A study of the microscopic structure of the principal tissues and 
organs of the animal body, with practical work in histological technique. 
Prerequisite, Biology 271 or the equivalent. One lecture hour and six 
laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Miss Harpster, Miss Thomas. 

373. Physiology of the Neuromuscular System, Respiration, and 
Circulation 

A detailed study of muscle, nerve, blood, circulation and respiration. 
Prerequisites, Biology 271, or 351, or 277 and Chemistry 101-102 or 
103-101/.. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Miss 
Thomas. 

374. Physiology of Digestion, Metabolism, Excretion and Reproduction 

A study of the chemistry and physiological processes of digestion, 
secretion, respiratory exchange, and excretion. Prerequisite, Biology 
373 or the equivalent. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Williams, Miss Thomas. 

378. Physiology of Activity 

A study of mechanisms involved in adjustments of the body to 
physical activity. Prerequisites, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-10 U and 
Biology 271-277. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Williams, Miss Thomas. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

281r. General Bacteriology 

A survey of the fundamentals of bacteriology. Laboratory tech- 
nique is emphasized. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102; prerequisite or par- 
allel, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-10U. One lecture hour and six labora- 
tory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Love, Miss Wooten. 



92 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

382. Pathogenic Bacteriology 

The relation of bacteria to disease in man. Clinical and diagnostic 
methods; isolation and identification of pathogenic micro-organisms. 
Prerequisite, Biology 281. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

383. Laboratory Methods in Clinical Diagnosis 

Examination of blood, spinal fluid, and other body fluids. Designed 
for medical laboratory technicians. Prerequisite, Biology 382. One lec- 
ture hour and six laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $J^..OO. Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

384. Immunology 

A study of the reaction of the body against infection, with demon- 
strations of antibody formation, and diagnostic serological reactions. 
Prerequisite, Biology 383. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1^.00. 
Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

387. Bacteriology for Nurses 

A survey of the fundamentals of bacteriology and a brief study of 
the pathogenic bacteria. Open only to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Such students may not elect Biology 
281 and 382. Prerequisites, Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE 
4 233r. Nature Study 

A general course intended to aid teachers in interesting pupils of 
both elementary and secondary schools in the common objects of nature. 
A number of the laboratory periods will be used for field study. 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Credit three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Rogers. 



*This course can not be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 






Department of Business Education 93 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Little JOHN (Head of the Department) ; Asso- 
ciate Professor Spruill; Assistant Professors Adams, Hard- 
away, Wellman, Fowler, Whitlock; Instructor Nolte; 
Graduate Assistant Giles. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Secretarial Administration integrates a broad general education with 
special education for students who are planning to enter business or 
business teaching. Three areas of concentration are provided: (1) sec- 
retarial sequence, leading to secretarial and related positions; (2) 
business teacher sequence, leading to clerical, stenographic, and basic 
business teaching positions in secondary schools and junior colleges; 
and (3) distributive education (retailing) sequence, leading to store 
service positions and distributive education positions in secondary 
schools. The business teacher sequence and the distributive education 
(retailing) sequence include courses required for a Grade A teaching 
certificate, valid in the high schools of North Carolina. 

The requirements in the freshman and sophomore years correspond 
to those of a liberal arts curriculum. Certain basic courses in economics 
which provide a fundamental understanding of the operation of busi- 
ness and of economic organization are required as a foundation for the 
more specialized courses offered in this department. 

For the requirements for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Secretarial Administration, see page 69. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Science with a ma- 
jor in business education is offered through courses in both the regular 
sessions and the summer sessions at the Woman's College Center of 
the Graduate School of the University of North Carolina. 

See also Graduate Division, page 195. 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
OFFICE SKILLS 

211-212. Elementary Typewriting 

Development of basic typewriting skills and their application to the 
production of letters, tabulations, and manuscripts. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each semester. 
Wellman, Nolte, Giles. 



94 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

311-312. Advanced Typewriting 

Development of sustained production on various kinds of typewriting 
problems. Major emphasis on typewriting problems commonly met in 
business offices and measured by office standards. Prerequisite, courses 
211-212 or the approved equivalent. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each semester. Fowler. 

321-322-423. Shorthand 

Development of reading and writing skills in Gregg shorthand and 
ability to take dictation and transcribe it. A minimum amount of 
directed work experience required during the third semester or during 
the summer preceding the third semester. (See courses 428 and 450.) 
Daily for three semesters. Credit, nine semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00 each, 321 and 322; $2, 423. Miss Hardaway, Miss Spruill, Miss 
Wellman, Miss Whitlock. 

331r. Duplicating Machines 

Development of skill in the use of gelatin, fluid process, and stencil 
duplicators. Prerequisite, courses 211-212 or the approved equivalent. 
Six laboratory hours for one-half semester, either semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Adams. 

322r. Transcribing Machines 

Development of a marketable skill in the use of transcribing 
machines. Prerequisite, courses 211-212 or the approved equivalent. Re- 
quirement: satisfactory completion of prescribed course evidenced by a 
certificate of proficiency on Ediphone or Dictaphone. Six laboratory 
hours for one-half semester, either semester. Credit, one semester hour. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Adams. 

341r. Secretarial Forms and Usage 

Training and practice in the correct use of business terms and 
vocabulary in order to develop proficiency and skill in the effective 
use of English for business purposes. Primarily for juniors. Two hours, 
either semester. Credit, two semester hours. 

351r. Filing 

Study of various systems of filing, both visible and vertical. Certifi- 
cate of American Filing Institute awarded on satisfactory completion 
of the course. Two laboratory hours, either semester. Credit, one se- 
mester hour. Laboratory fee, 50 cents. Miss Spruill. 

428. Advanced Dictation and Transcription 

Further development of dictation and transcription skill with empha- 
sis on "mailable" transcripts. A minimum amount of secretarial expe- 
rience required if not completed in courses 423 or 450. Prerequisite, 
courses 321-322-423 or the equivalent. Daily, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Spruill, Miss Well- 
man, Miss Whitlock. 






Department op Business Education 95 

433r. Calculating Machines 

Development of a marketable skill in the use of adding, calculating, 
and posting machines. Six laboratory hours, either semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Adams. 

430. Specialized Dictation and Reporting 

Court, convention, and conference reporting. Attention to specialized 
secretarial work in such fields as civil service, insurance, medicine, law, 
textile industry, aviation, and engineering. Undergraduates may not 
take this course for credit if they have 12 hours of credit in shorthand. 
For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss 
Spruill. 

s431. Office Machines 

Development of a fair degree of skill in the use of office machines 
and equipment: gelatin, stencil, and fluid process duplicators; adding, 
calculating, and posting machines; dictating and transcription machines; 
and the Vari-Typer. Four laboratory hours, daily. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Adams. (Summer school 
only.) 

450. Directed Business Practice. See page 96. 

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING 

Mathematics SJ^l. Statistical Methods I. See page 149. 

314. Business Data 

A study of the uses and sources of numerical data in business, and 
of the techniques of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and interpreting 
elementary statistical material, with emphasis upon its presentation 
in business reports. Two hours, either semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Hardaway. 

335. Advanced Accounting 

Rapid review of the accounting processes, with particular emphasis 
on adjustments, working papers, financial statements, and closing and 
reversing entries. An intensive study of accounting statements and the 
items that comprise them, with major attention to procedures involved 
in evaluating, reporting, and interpreting accounting statement items. 
For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Prerequisite, Economics 
233-231+ or the equivalent. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Littlejohn. 

336. Advanced Accounting 

Some of the technical accounting procedures arising out of such 
specialized business situations as are encountered in income tax, part- 
nership, consignment, agencies and branch offices, installment sales, 



96 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

and mergers and consolidations. For graduates and advanced under- 
graduates. Prerequisite, course 335 or the equivalent. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Littlejohn. 

424r. Office Management 

Principles, materials, and techniques of office procedures and man- 
agement. For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Two hours, 
either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Spruill, Miss Well- 
man. 

426r. Business Correspondence 

Introduction to current practices in business correspondence and 
composition of business letters. Three hours, either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Whitlock. 

RETAILING 
314. Business Data. See page 95. 

345r. Introduction to Retailing 

Fundamental principles of retail store organization; management, 
merchandising, publicity, and control. Students preparing to teach 
business subjects in the secondary schools should find this course valu- 
able. For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Elective for juniors 
and seniors. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Fowler. 

445. Merchandise Information 

Intensive study of selected items of non-textile merchandise. The 
preparation of a merchandise manual by each member of the class. For 
graduates and advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites, course 31+5 and 
consent of the instructor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Fowler. 

446. Problems in Retailing 

Critical examination and analysis of the problems in retail store 
operation. Classroom work correlated with specific store situations. For 
graduates and advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites, course 3U5 and 
consent of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Fowler. 

m 

450. Directed Business Practice. See page 97. 

Art 101. Design. See page 79. 

Art 22U. Color. See page 79. 

Art 327. Design for Advertising and Display. See page 80. 



Department of Business Education 97 

Economics 330. Principles of Marketing. See page 107. 
Home Economics 3J+1> Textiles. See page 139. 
Psychology 232. Applied Psychology. See page 164. 
Psychology 335. Personnel Psychology. See page 164. 
Psychology 3b0. Measurement in Personnel Work. See page 165. 

WORK EXPERIENCE 

450. Directed Business Practice 

Planned work experience approved in advance by instructor. A 
paper or project and a rating by the employer required. This course 
meets the work experience requirement in courses 423 and 428, and 
partially fulfills the state requirements for certification as retail-selling 
co-ordinator. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Time to be arranged. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Whitlock, Miss Fowler. 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES FOR BUSINESS TEACHERS 

365. Principles of Business Education 

The scope and functions of the agencies and institutions for busi- 
ness education; the aims and objectives of business education. An 
evaluation of various business curricula in relation to modern educa- 
tional philosophy, trends in business education, and findings of research. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Little- 
john. 

463. Methods and Student Teaching in the Skill Subjects 

Analysis and evaluation of objectives, materials, and methods for 
teaching office skills. Provision for critical observation of demonstra- 
tion teaching and for supervised teaching experience in the Curry 
School and in the Greensboro Senior High School. A co-ordinated pro- 
gram in which classroom lectures and individual and group conferences 
are closely related to the immediate teaching experience of the student 
teacher. Either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Materials fee, 
$1.00. Staff. 

464. Methods and Student Teaching in Basic Business Subjects 

Selection, organization, and evaluation of appropriate textbook and 
supplementary materials; and critical analysis of techniques and pro- 
cedures in teaching basic business subjects. Study of methods and 
materials co-ordinated with directed observation of demonstration teach- 
ing and supervised teaching in the Curry School and in the Greensboro 
Senior High School. Either semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Materials fee, $1.00. Staff. 



98 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate program in business education for the Graduate School 
of the University of North Carolina is a function of the Woman's Col- 
lege Center. Students are encouraged to complete some graduate study 
at the Chapel Hill Center. The program is designed to prepare master 
teachers and supervisors of business subjects, including teachers and 
heads of departments in secondary schools, junior colleges, and teacher- 
training institutions. The teacher-training function of the North Caro- 
lina Distributive Education Service is an integral part of the graduate 
program in business education. A special leaflet outlining the require- 
ments for the degree of Master of Science may be obtained from the 
head of the department, on request. 

484. Tests and Measurements in Business Education 

A study of the types, functions, construction, evaluation, adminis- 
tration, and scoring of tests in business courses. Analysis and inter- 
pretation of test results. Primarily for graduates. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Hardaway. 

501. Thesis 

Graduate students with approved thesis subjects may register for 
this course. Credit may be divided between two semesters. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Wellman, Mr. Littlejohn, Miss Hardaway. 

505. Business Statistics 

A study of the steps in the statistical approach to problems in busi- 
ness and economics; collection of data; presentation of tables and 
graphs; analysis of frequency distributions and time series; calcula- 
tion of ratios, index numbers, and linear correlation coefficients. Empha- 
sis on the significance, usefulness, and limitations of statistical meth- 
ods in dealing with economic data. Credit, two to three semester hours. 
Miss Hardaway. 

510. Seminar 

An introductory course in research which the student should take 
before attempting to write a thesis. A general introduction to methods 
of advanced study, a critical analysis of research in business education, 
and intensive work on a definite problem. Credit, two to four semester 
hours. Miss Wellman, Mr. Littlejohn, Miss Hardaway. 

511. Review of Research 

An advanced course in research, providing for intensive study, 
analysis, and evaluation of research in business education and related 
fields. Credit, two to four semester hours. Miss Wellman. 



Department of Business Education 99 

512. Field Study 

Opportunity for individual investigation, conducted in absentia with 
periodic conferences and reports required. Students are encouraged to 
study their individual problems with approved research techniques. 
Prerequisite, course 510. Credit, two to four semester hours. Staff. 

515r. Seminar in Teaching 

Critical examination and evaluation of current research in teaching 
procedures. One hour, either semester. Credit, one semester hour. Credit 
for two semesters may be allowed in this course. Miss Wellman. 

520. Principles and Problems in Business Education 

Problems and issues in business education, including philosophy, 
functions, and relationships. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Little- 
john. 

523. Principles and Problems in Distributive Education 

Orientation in the field of distributive education: discussion of the 
principles and relationships in the federally aided programs and other 
types of co-operative and part-time programs. Consideration given to 
materials and procedures in retailing. Credit, two semester hours. 

525. Organization and Administration of Co-operative Programs 

The selection, placement, supervision, co-ordination, and teaching of 
students in co-operative work-study programs in secondary schools. 
Special consideration given to federal and state legislation and regu- 
lations governing distributive education. Credit, two semester hours. 

529a. Curriculum Problems in Business Education 

An evaluation of present curriculum practices and trends in terms 
of the functions of education and business education. The curriculum 
workshop technique is followed. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Little- 
john. 

529b. Curriculum Making in Technical Business Education 

The statement of objectives, selection of appropriate teaching mate- 
rials, learning exercises, and recommended teaching procedures in the 
courses which have as their primary purpose technical skill develop- 
ment and job training for the office occupations. The curriculum work- 
shop technique is followed, with an opportunity to work on individual 
problems. Credit, one to two semester hours. Staff. 

529c. Curriculum Making in Basic Business Education 

Consideration of the scope, objectives, teaching materials, and teach- 
ing procedures in (1) the courses which have for their primary pur- 
pose the development of economic intelligence of all students, and (2) 
the courses which have for their primary purposes the development 



100 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

of an understanding of business and job intelligence essential for suc- 
cess in business occupations. The curriculum workshop technique is 
followed, with an opportunity to work on individual problems. Credit, 
one to two semester hours. Staff. 

s531. Improving Instruction in Bookkeeping 

Recommended materials and procedures in teaching bookkeeping, and 
an analysis of standardized test materials. Credit, two semester hours. 
(Summer school only.) 

532. Improving Instruction in Distributive Education 

Organization and presentation of materials in retailing, with par- 
ticular reference to their use in co-operative programs; the conference 
method as an integrating procedure. Credit, two semester hours. 

s535. Improving Instruction in Gregg Shorthand 

Materials and methods in Gregg shorthand, new classroom proce- 
dures and techniques, and recent research and standards of achieve- 
ment. Opportunity for observation in a demonstration class. Credit, 
two semester hours. (Summer school only.) 

s536. Improving Instruction in Typewriting 

Materials and methods of teaching typewriting. Special attention 
to a study of individual differences. Opportunity for observation in a 
demonstration class. Credit, two semester hours. (Summer school 
only.) 

539. Improving Instruction in Office Practice 

Materials and teaching procedures in office and clerical practice, 
including an acquaintance with and and instructional use of office 
machines. Six laboratory hours, either semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss Adams. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Schaeffer (Head of the Department), Petty, 
Barrow; Assistant Professor Marble; Instructors Ryan, 
Morgan; Assistants Andrews, Hunter, Romefelt. 

101-102. General Chemistry 

An introduction to the theories, principles, and applications of the 
various fields of chemistry. Two lecture hours and one three-hour lab- 
oratory for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 
each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Ryan, Miss Morgan, Miss Romefelt. 






Department of Chemistry 101 

103-104. General Chemistry 

A general course designed for those students who have had high 
school chemistry. Offered for students who present one unit in chem- 
istry for entrance. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 each 
semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Ryan, Miss Romefelt. 

221. Qualitative Analysis 

A study of the theoretical principles of inorganic qualitative analy- 
sis with laboratory work in the separation and identification of the 
common cations and anions using the semi-micro technique. Prerequi- 
site, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104- One lecture hour and two three- 
hour laboratories, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $4.00. Miss Marble, Miss Andrews. 

225. Introductory Course in Organic Chemistry 

An introduction to organic chemistry in preparation for Chemistry 
326. Prerequisite, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104. Two lecture hours and 
one three-hour laboratory, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Barrow, Miss Hunter. 

231-332. Organic Chemistry 

A study of the aliphatic hydrocarbons, their derivatives, fats, carbo- 
hydrates, proteins, and the aromatic series of organic compounds. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-10 '4. One lecture hour and two 
three-hour laboratories for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $4.00 each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Andrews. 

322. Quantitative Analysis 

An introduction to quantitative analysis including a study of the 
principles and methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. In the 
laboratory work the main emphasis is placed upon volumetric methods. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 221. One lecture hour and two three-hour lab- 
oratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Miss Marble, Miss Andrews. 

323. Advanced Quantitative Analysis 

A continuation of Chemistry 322. In the laboratory work the empha- 
sis is placed upon gravimetric methods of analysis. Prerequisite, Chem- 
istry 322. One lecture hour and two three-hour laboratories, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4-00. Miss Marble. 

326. Introductory Course in Biochemistry 

An introduction to biochemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 225. Two 
lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Barrow, Miss Hunter. 



102 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

335-336. Biochemistry 

The chemistry of the carbohydrates, lipins, proteins, with studies in 
digestion, urine and blood analysis, and organic tissues. Prerequisites, 
Chemistry 231-332, 322. One lecture hour and two three-hour labora- 
tories. Credit six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.-00 each semester. 
Miss Barrow, Miss Hunter. 

337-338. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

The identifying characteristics of the various classes of organic 
compounds will be studied together with the techniques employed in 
the identification of specific examples of each class. Prerequsite, Chem- 
istry 231-332. One lecture hour and two three-hour laboratories for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 each 
semester. 

342. Physical Chemistry Lectures 

An introduction to the principles and problems of physical chemis- 
try. Prerequisites, Chemistry 221-322, 231-332; Mathematics 101-102 or 
103-104; Physics 101-102. Two lecture hours, first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Schaeffer. 

343. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

To accompany Chemistry 342. Practice in the making of fundamen- 
tal physico-chemical measurements with emphasis on the mathematical 
treatment and interpretation of scientific data. Prerequisites, see Chem- 
istry 842. Two three-hour laboratories, first semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Marble. 

344. Physical Chemistry 

A continuation of Chemistry 342-343 dealing with chemical equili- 
brium and kinetics, electrochemistry, atomic structure, and colloid 
chemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 342-343. One lecture hour and two 
three-hour laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Marble. 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

The purpose of this course is to co-ordinate the previous course 
work of the student in the field of chemistry and to present a general 
survey of the field. Required of all students majoring in chemistry. 
Three lecture hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Schaeffer. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



Department of Classical Civilization 103 

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Professor Jernigan (Head of the Department) ; Instruc- 
tor Soles. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION 
(No knowledge of Greek or Latin required) 

lllr. Mythology 

Designed mainly for freshmen. The great myths of the world with 
frequent references to the literature which they inspired. The Greek, 
Roman, and Norse mythologies are stressed. Three hours, either se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

335. Greek and Latin Literature in Translation 

Introductory lectures on the art of epic poetry and the influence of 
the Greek and Roman epic upon subsequent literature. Homer and 
Vergil studied in translation. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

336. Greek and Latin Literature in Translation 

Devoted mainly to the study of Greek tragedy through the medium 
of translations, though some attention is paid to other types of Greek 
and Latin literature. Accompanied by lectures on Greek literary and 
religious conceptions, on the ideals which made Greek culture pre- 
eminent in the history of thought, and on the influence of Greek litera- 
ture upon subsequent thought. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

397. The Epic in World Literature 

A course in the comparative study of major world epics through the 
medium of translations. The following works will be read in whole or 
in part: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Maha-Bharata, Ramayana, Chanson de 
Roland, Nibelungenlied, Divine Comedy, Jerusalem Delivered, Beowulf, 
Kalevala, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

398. Studies in World Types of the Drama and Lyric 

Comparative studies by means of translations of some of the best 
of the Greek, Latin, and modern plays and lyrics. Representative plays 
from Aeschylus through Euripides, Terence, and Racine to O'Neill. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan. 

330. Ancient Art. See Art 330, page 84. 



104 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

GREEK 

201-202. Greek far Beginners 

Greek language and cultural influences. Emphasis on the fundamen- 
tal principles of grammar, and special attention to the correlation of 
Greek grammar with the grammar of modern languages, particularly 
English. Open to freshmen and recommended for students of the lan- 
guages, religion, and medicine. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

303-304. Xenophon, "Anabasis"; Selections from the New Testament 

Designed to develop fluency in the reading of Greek and to introduce 
the student to a part of the great literature of the past. Selections from 
Lucian. Prerequisite, Greek 201-202 or two entrance units. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

325-326. Homer, "Iliad" 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

401-402. Plato, Selected Works. {Apology, Crito, etc.). 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

LATIN 

101-102. Latin for Beginners 

Essentials of grammar and reading of selections from Caesar. De- 
signed to give a fundamental knowledge of the Latin language, to 
present an introduction to the further study of Roman literature and 
civilization, and to provide for a greater understanding of English by 
means of the comparative study of English and Latin words and syn- 
tax. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Soles. 

103-104. Introduction to Latin Literature 

Review of fundamentals. Selected readings from Caesar, Cicero, Ovid 
and others. Prerequisite, Latin 101-102 or two entrance units. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Soles. 

105-106. Vergil, "Aeneid" I-VI 

Readings, with lectures on pertinent topics, with emphasis upon 
literary appreciation. Prerequisite, Latin 103-10 U, or three entrance 
units. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Soles. 

207. Ovid, "Metamorphoses" 

Reading and interpretations of selected passages. Lectures and writ- 
ten reports on pertinent topics. Prerequisites, four entrance units or 
three entrance units by consent of the instructor. Three hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Soles. 



Department of Classical Civilization 105 

208. Horace 

Selections from the Odes and Epodes. Prerequisite, Latin 105-106 
or four entrance units. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Miss Soles. 

209. Latin Prose and Poetry Selections 

Livy, Sallust, Ovid, Seutonius, Gellius, etc. Prerequisites, four 
entrance units or three entrance units by consent of the instructor. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Soles. 

210. Roman Oratory and Philosophy 

Readings from Cicero and Lucretius. Prerequisite, 105-106 or four 
entrance units. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Soles. 

211. Catullus 

The poems of Catullus are read with special emphasis on literary 
appreciation. Prerequisite, Latin 105-106 or four entrance units. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Soles. 

COURSES FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

Not all of the following courses will be offered in any one year; a 
selection wil be made to meet the needs and desires of students major- 
ing in Latin. Other courses in Latin literature will be offered as needed. 
These courses may be offered either semester. 

321. Roman Comedy 

Plautus. Reading of selected plays. Study of the background and 
development of Roman drama. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan or Miss Soles. 

322. Roman Comedy 

Terence. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan or Miss Soles. 

323. Elegiac Poetry 

Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. A study of Latin elegiac 
poetry; its source, types, and influence. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Jernigan or Miss Soles. 

325. Rome and Carthage 

Reading from Livy, Books XXXI-XLV, and Tacitus. Development of 
Rome as a world power from the first Punic War until the subjuga- 
tion of Macedon. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan or Miss 
Soles. 

326. Roman Satire 

Readings from Martial and Juvenal. Lectures and written reports. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan or Miss Soles. 



106 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

331. Advanced Prose Composition 

Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan or Miss Soles. 
333. Vergil 

Reading in the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. The art of Vergil 
in its development. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan or Miss 
Soles. 

335. Latin Literature in Translation 

See Classical Civilization 335. 
342. History and Politics in the Times of Julius Caesar 

A study of the period 63-44 B.C. Readings from Sallust's Catiline, 
Suetonius's Life of Julius Caesar, Caesar's Gallic War and Civil War, 
and Cicero's Orations and Letters. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Jernigan or Miss Soles. 

450. Co-ordinating Course for Majors 

Extensive readings in literature of the Classics selected in accord- 
ance wih student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, and 
quizzes throughout the term. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Professors Keister (Head of the Department), Little- 
john; Assistant Professors Lindsey, Fowler; Instructors 

Austin, Neale. 

211. Principles of Economics 

A study of the present-day economic system ; specialization ; machine 
industry; large-scale production; function of middlemen and markets; 
demand, supply, and prices; money, credit, and banking. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Austin, Mr. Neale. 

212. Principles of Economics 

Business cycles and depressions; international trade, foreign ex- 
change and protective tariffs; monopolies and their regulations; the 
distribution of wealth in modern society; consumption; a comparison 
of capitalism, fascism, socialism, and communism. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Austin, Mr. Neale. 

233-234. Principles of Accounting 

The typical transactions of a business firm as they pass through the 
books; closing the books and making up the statements. Business forms 
and practices are analyzed to give a familiarity with modern business 
procedure. Recitations and laboratory problems. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Lindsey. 



Department of Economics 107 

323. Public Finance 

The chief governmental expenditures and the main sources of 
revenue used by governments; property taxes; income and inheritance 
taxes, and various forms of sales taxes; the distribution of the tax 
burden on different classes in society; improvements needed in the tax 
structure; managing the heavy federal debt. Three hours, first semester. 
Open to graduate students in Business Education. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Keister. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

324. Labor Problems 

The conflict of interest between workers and employers, and some of 
the more important results of this conflict, such as labor organizations, 
collective bargaining, and labor legislation. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Open to graduate students in Business Education. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

325r. General Economics — Briefer Course 

A survey of elementary economics especially designed for students 
who may want only one semester of work in the field. A brief treat- 
ment will be given to the production and distribution of wealth in 
society, to money and banking, to the organization of corporations, to 
the business cycle and to labor problems. Elective for juniors and 
seniors except those who have had Economics 211-212. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister, Mr. Neale. 

327. Money and Banking 

How our different varieties of money and credit instruments are 
issued and secured; the functions performed by money in our society; 
the services of commercial banks and of the Federal Reserve System. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

328r. The Management of Personal Finances 

Budgeting and keeping account of one's personal funds; borrowing 
money; buying on credit and making out personal income tax returns; 
saving and the wise investing of savings. Three hours, either semester. 
Open to graduate students in Business Education. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Keister. 

330r. Principles of Marketing 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study 
of the functions, policies, and institutions involved in the marketing 
process. Marketing changes brought about by chain stores, super- 
markets, frozen foods, etc., will be studied. Three hours, either semes- 
ter. Open to graduate students in Business Education. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Austin. 



108 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

333. Social Control of Business 

The responsibilities of business to society are emphasized in this 
course. Different methods of encouraging and compelling business to 
recognize its social responsibilities are discussed, including governmen- 
tal regulation of corporations, rate fixing of public utility enterprises, 
the growing recognition of the rights of labor and consumers, and the 
better ethical practices voluntarily developed by some business concerns. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Neale. 

337. Institution Accounting 

The fundamental principles and techniques of accounting applied to 
a tea room, a school cafeteria, the nutrition department of a hospital, 
a college residence hall, a city club, and similar organizations. Two 
laboratory hours and two recitation hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Fowler. 

349. Basic Features of Capitalism 

After an historical survey of the origins and foundations of modern 
capitalism the basic features of present day capitalism as it operates 
in the United States will be analyzed. The relationships between the 
growth of capitalism and the growth of democracy will be developed. 
Reforms proposed to make capitalism function more effectively will be 
considered. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Neale. 

350. Comparative Economic Systems 

A comparison of capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism as 
economic systems and as philosophies. The practical difficulties en- 
countered when a society changes from one system to another and 
when any system operates on a nation-wide basis in the modern world. 
Prerequisite, 34-9, except with the special permission of the instructor. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Neale. 

431-432. Business Law 

The general principles of business law, including contracts, agency, 
sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, and bank- 
ruptcy. Three hours, throughout the year. Open to graduate students 
in Business Education. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Littlejohn. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



Department of Economics 109 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professors Cooke (Head of the Department), Ruth Fitz- 
gerald, Clutts, McNutt; Associate Professors Kimmel, 
Denneen, Smith, Shaver, Vaughan; Assistant Professors 
Reger, Kreimeier, Mary Fitzgerald, Mehaffie, Gunter, 
Eugenia Hunter, Watson, Montague, Peden, Browning; 
Instructors Park, Mary Hunter, Huffman, Lael, Hester, 
Szabo, Cleveland, Sears. 

The Curry School, located on the college campus, includes kinder- 
garten, elementary, and secondary schools. The Curry School serves as 
a demonstration, practice, and experimental center with particular 
emphasis upon the educational needs and problems of North Carolina. 
It also serves the several departments of the College that are concerned 
with child problems and the preparation of teachers. Undergraduate 
students here receive their initial experiences with children, including 
observation and teaching. The school is a member of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is administered by 
the principal. 

31 7r. The American Public School 

The unique function of public education in a democracy; the 
inter-relationships of local, state, and national governments to educa- 
tion; the over-all organization, administration, and financing of public 
education; an over view of the school's curriculum; pupil personnel and 
pupil accounting; teaching as a vocation and a profession. Certificate 
requirement for both elementary and secondary teachers. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Cooke and others. 

358. Improvement of Reading 

Analysis of the causes of inferior reading; diagnostic and remedial 
techniques; motivation for improvement; observation of, and participa- 
tion in, the activities of an elementary or a secondary school remedial 
reading group. General elective. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Fitzgerald. 

481r. The Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education in the 
Public School 

The background, purposes, and concepts basic to public education; 
the school as an expression of social and economic life, as a modifying 
influence on this life, as an interpreter of ideologies, as an instrument 
for the transmission of culture; the evolution, use, and personal signi- 
ficance to the teacher of the dominant American philosophy of educa- 
tion. Certificate requirement for both elementary and secondary teachers. 



110 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. McNutt 
and others. 

489. History of Education 

The evolution of formal education in Western cultures with parti- 
cular emphasis upon American modifications arising from the frontier 
experience of the people and the industrial revolution; contributions and 
personalities of the great leaders. General elective. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

350r. Group Observation and Study of Secondary Pupils 

Review, mastery, and practical application of the fundamental 
theoretical concepts of the intellectual, physical, social, and emotional 
development of groups of secondary pupils through out-of-school and 
in-school experiences; diagnostic and remedial procedures in teaching; 
tests and evaluations of the results of teaching; extra-curricular in- 
school experiences of secondary pupils. Certificate requirement for 
secondary teachers. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Clutts and others. 

35 lr. Materials and Methods in Secondary School English 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to 
objectives in English; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; 
controlled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry School. 
Required of student teachers in English. Three hours, either semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Kreimeier. 

352. Materials and Methods in Secondary School French 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to ob- 
jectives in French; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; con- 
trolled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry School. Re- 
quired of student teachers in French. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Shaver. 

353. Materials and Methods in Secondary School Social Studies 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to 
objectives in the social studies; criteria for methods, devices, and ma- 
terials; controlled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry 
School. Required of student teachers in the social studies. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mehaffie. 

355. Materials and Methods in Secondary School Latin 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to 
objectives in Latin; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; cor- 
relation with English; controlled purposeful observation and teaching 
in the Curry School. Required of student teachers in Latin. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Denneen. 



Department of Education 111 

357. Materials and Methods in Secondary School Mathematics 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to 
objectives in mathematics; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; 
controlled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry School. Re- 
quired of student teachers in mathematics. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Kimmel. 

359. Materials and Methods in Secondary School Science 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to 
objectives in science; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; con- 
trolled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry School. Re- 
quired of student teachers in science. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

461r. Student Teaching 

Supervised student teaching in Curry Secondary School. The work 
in Curry School is done under the direction of the Head of the Depart- 
ment of Education and a special supervisor for each subject. Introduc- 
tory observation and participation; semi-independent teaching; daily 
teaching assignments; conferences with the head of the department 
and supervisors. Prerequisite, all anticipatory courses. Certificate re- 
quirement for secondary teachers. Three hours, either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Cooke and supervisors. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

330. Group Observation and Study of Elementary Pupils 

Review, mastery, and practical application of the fundamental theo- 
retical concepts of the intellectual, physical, social and emotional de- 
velopment of groups of elementary pupils through out-of-school and in- 
school experiences; diagnostic and remedial procedures in teaching; 
tests and evaluations of the results of teaching; extracurricular in- 
school experiences of elementary pupils. Certificate requirement for 
elementary teachers. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Ruth Fitzgerald and Miss Eugenia Hunter. 

421. Reading in the Primary School 

The conditions under which reading skill appears in young chil- 
dren including anticipatory experiences, home and school atmosphere, 
the inward compulsion of felt need, differentiated materials, abundant 
opportunities and propitious types of group organizations; basic techni- 
ques and remedial measures; observation. Required of primary teachers. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Hunter. 

423. Fundamental Skills in the Primary School 

The approaches to the fundamental skills; utilization of group pur- 
poses to yield the necessary anticipatory experiences and functional 
use of number, spelling, writing, and oral and written expression; 



112 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

essential techniques and remedial measures. Required of primary 
teachers. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Hunter. 

424. Literature for Young Children (Kindergarten-Primary) 

The reading, discussion, enjoyment, and organization of materials 
suited to the interests and needs of young children. Required of pri- 
mary teachers. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Hunter. 

433. Education in the Kindergarten 

The mental, physical, and social needs of the child, four to six; and 
the materials, activities, and guidance essential to their fulfillment; 
observation in the nursery, kindergarten, and primary school. Open to 
primary teachers. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Hunter. 

443-444. Materials and Methods of the Curriculum for Intermediate and 
Upper Grades 

The organization of the curriculum for the intermediate and upper 
grades; first semester, arithmetic and the language arts; second se- 
mester, physical and social sciences; supervised observation. Required 
of upper elementary teachers. Six hours, first and second semesters. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Ruth Fitzgerald. 

446. Literature for the Upper Elementary School 

The literature suitable for children in the middle and upper grades; 
its place in the integrated curriculum. Required of upper elementary 
teachers. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Ruth Fitzgerald. 

463r. Student Teaching 

Supervised student teaching in Curry Elementary School. The work 
in Curry School is done under the direction of the head of the depart- 
ment of Education, a college teacher of methods courses, and a special 
supervisor for each grade. Introductory observation and participation; 
semi-independent teaching; daily teaching assignments; conferences 
with the head of the department, teacher of methods, and supervisors. 
Prerequisite, all anticipatory courses. Certificate requirement for ele- 
mentary teachers. Six hours, either semester. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Cooke, Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, Miss Eugenia Hunter, and 
supervisors. 



Department of Education 113 

LIBRARY EDUCATION 

The following courses are designed to prepare teacher-librarians for 
part-time library work: 

322. Classification and Cataloguing 

An introduction to the principles of classification and cataloguing; 
supervised practice in applying the simplified Dewey Decimal system, 
cataloguing books, and organizing a dictionary catalogue. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. 

321. School Library Administration 

The organization, administration, and functions of the school library, 
including planning, equipment, budgets, book buying, circulation, pub- 
licity, records, reports, acquisition and care of non-book materials. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. 

324. Reference 

A study of the reference collection designed to give the student a 
practical knowledge of the standard reference books, facility in their 
use, ability to judge their value, and methods for use in reference 
service. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Reger. 

323. Book Selection and Reading Guidance 

A survey of literature for adolescents; study of reading interests of 
adolescents; criteria for book selection with provision for individual 
differences. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Reger. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND TEACHERS-IN-SERVICE 

The graduate curriculum in elementary education is composed of 
nine courses of which six, a major, must be strictly within the field 
of elementary education, and three, a minor, in some closely related 
area. Many of the courses are open to teachers-in-service who may 
be pursuing a program leading to state certification, but who are not 
prospective candidates for any degree. 

Inasmuch as many enrollees are teachers-in-service, the following 
courses are offered at late afternoon or evening hours and on Satur- 
days. Interested students may obtain a course and time schedule by 
applying to the Associate Dean of the Graduate School, Office 9, Curry 
Building. 

Graduates in a program leading to a Master's degree should select 
a tool of research, and register for course 680 or 681. This should be 
done early in the program, for command of a tool of research is pre- 
requisite to admission to candidacy. A thesis is required of all candi- 
dates. No credit is given for the thesis as such, but two credit-yield- 
ing courses, 682 and 683, are concerned exclusively with the candidate's 
selection of a problem and the subsequent guidance. 



114 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

A description of the graduate organization and general requirements 
appears on page 176. Detailed information concerning any aspect may 
be obtained at the office of the Associate Dean of the Graduate SchooL 

296ab. Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools 

a. Types and general principles, b. Specifics used in implementa- 
tion. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

501. Health of Young Children 

Physical defects, respiratory and circulatory disturbances, endocrine 
balance, orthopedic and muscular defects, communicable diseases com- 
mon to the age. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

505. Dance in Education: A Workshop 

Theory, observation, participation. Credit, one-half course; two 
semester hours. 

520ab. The Teacher and the Library 

a. The library and its resources, b. Book selection and reading 
guidance. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

521. Literature in Elementary Education 

Prerequisite, an undergraduate course in children's literature. Credit, 
one-half course; two semester hours. 

523. Reading in the Elementary School 

Prerequisite, an undergraduate course in methods of reading. Credit, 
one-half course; two semester hours. 

525ab. Language Arts in the Elementary School 

a. North Carolina's Twelve Year Program, b. Curriculum for spe- 
cific grades or levels. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semes- 
ter hours. 

527. Reading Clinic 

Theory; observation and participation. Prerequisite, undergraduate 
course in reading methods. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

541. Music Program of the Elementary School 

Prerequisite, undergraduate state requirement in music education. 
Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

542. Improvement of Music Reading 

Prerequisite, undergraduate state requirement in music education. 
Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

548. School Music Clinic 

Theory, observation and participation. Prerequisite, undergraduate 
state requirement in music education. Credit, one-half course; two 
semester hours. 



Department of Education 115 

549. Seminar, Music Education 

Prerequisite, Course 541, 542, or 548. Credit, one-half course; two 
semester hours. 

560abc. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom 

a. Basic principles, b. Applications in classroom organization and 
management, c. Problem children. Credit, one-half, one, and one and one- 
half courses; two, four or six semester hours. 

561 abc. Supervision: Evaluation and Improvement of Instruction 

a. Superior practice in skill aspects, b. Superior practice in content 
aspects, c. Criteria for activity programs. Credit, one-half, one, or one 
and one-half courses; two, four or six semester hours. 

567ab. Educational Guidance in the Elementary School 

a. General principles, b. Applications, devices, instruments. Credit, 
one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

568ab. Elementary School Organization and Administration 

a. General principles and common types, b. Applications, devices, 
instruments. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

569abc. Curriculum Construction 

a. General principles, b. Primary-kindergarten curricula, c. Upper 
grade curricula. Credit, one-lutlf, one or one and one-half courses; two, 
four or six semester hours. 

570ab. Teaching Clinic 

Theory, observation, participation, a. General clinic, b. Social 
studies. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

582. Biography for Teachers 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

583. Cultural Comparisons: Primitive Contemporaries 
Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

584. Geographic Patterns and Problems in Elementary Education 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

585. Educational Sociology 

The school in its relationship to the community as a whole, and the 
interaction of education and community mores. Credit, one-half course; 
two semester hours. 

605. Practical Arts in Elementary Education 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 
620. The Atypical Child 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 



116 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

626ab. Seminar: The Pre-school Child 

a. Selected problem, b. Selected problem. Credit, one-half or one 
course; two or four semester hours. 

640ab. Philosophy of Education 

a. Evolution of the dominant American philosophy, b. Use as a 
criterion in the evaluation of school practices. Credit, one-half or one 
course; two or four semester hours. 

660. Principles of Elementary School Science 

The orientation of young children in scientific attitudes and habits 
through investigations appropriate for the age level. Credit, one-half 
course, two semester hours. 

661abc. Elementary School Science 

a. The North Carolina Twelve Year Program, b. Science on the 
Primary-jKindergarten level, c. Science on the upper-grade level. Credit, 
one-half, one or one and one-half courses; two, four or six semester 
hours. 

662. Audio-Visual Education 

An examination of educational procedures with view to extending 
the use of audio-visual aids; principles, equipment, materials. Credit, 
one-half course; two semester hours. 

663. Resource-Use Education 

Education to promote the better use of human and material re- 
sources. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

692. Character Education 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

680. Statistics 

Offered as a research tool. No credit. 

681. Modern Language 

Offered as a research tool. Consult head, Department of Romance 
Languages. No credit. 

682. Thesis Writing 

Required of candidates for the Master's degree. Credit, one-half 
course; two semester hours. 

683. Individual Thesis Problem 

Required of candidates for the Master's degree. Credit, one-half 
course; two semester hours. 

690ab. Seminar: Elementary Education 

a. Selected problem, b. Selected problem. Credit, one-half or one 
course; two or four semester hours. 



Department of English 117 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Hurley (Head of the Department), Hall, 
Taylor, Dunn, Wilson, Summerell, James Painter, Fried- 
laender; Associate Professors Gould, Rowley, Tillett, 
Bridgers, Randall Jarrell;, Assistant Professors Bush, 
Spivey, England, Bowman, Rogers; Instructors Kathleen 
Painter, Thayer, Fitzpatrick, Mackie Jarrell, Barwick. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. A 
freshman whose proficiency in composition and in reading is below col- 
legiate standard shall be enrolled in English A, without credit, until 
the required standard is attained and she can be admitted to English 

101. A deficient student may also be asked to work in a special section in 
remedial English, one or two hours a week, while taking English 101. 
Any undergraduate whose work in a course in any department gives 
evidence of lack of proficiency in written English or in reading ability 
shall be referred to the Department of English; she will then be sent 
to a section in remedial English to correct her deficiencies. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

101-102. English Composition and Literature 

English 101-102 and 211-212 are to be considered as a unit, the objec- 
tive of which is mature reading and writing. Expository writing and 
the reading of exposition. An introduction to the reading of narration 
and to critical writing. For freshmen. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Bush, Mr. Hurley, Mr. Hall, Mr. Dunn, Mr. 
Wilson, Miss Summerell, Mr. Friedlaender, Mr. Painter, Miss Gould, 
Miss Rowley, Miss Tillett, Mr. Bridgers, Mr. Jarrell, Mrs. Spivey, Mrs. 
Painter, Miss Thayer, Mrs. Jarrell, Miss Barwick. 

211-212. English Literature and Composition 

A continuation of the reading and writing training of English 101- 

102. An orderly introduction to English literature through the interpre- 
tation of complete works. The student will be expected to write a num- 
ber of critical essays. For sophomores. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Hall, Mr. Hurley, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Dunn, Mr. 
Wilson, Miss Summerell, Mr. Painter, Mr. Friedlaender, Miss Gould, 
Miss Rowley, Miss Tillett, Mr. Bridgers, Miss Bush, Mrs. Spivey, Miss 
Thayer, Mrs. Jarrell, Miss Barwick. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The courses listed below are open to qualified students according to 
the college regulations except as specifically stated in the course descrip- 
tions. For example, although Speech 111 ordinarily will be elected by 



118 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

first year students, it may be elected by upperclassmen. Comparative 
Literature 301 or 302, European Literary Masterpieces, although pri- 
marily junior and senior electives, may be elected by sophomores who 
have shown distinction in English 101-102. 

The student who majors in English, in addition to the required Eng- 
lish Literature and Composition (211-212), is expected to elect three 
hours of American Literature (351 or 352 or 354) and to elect Shake- 
speare (339). Beyond these elections, with the advice of the head of the 
department or her department adviser, she will be expected to decide 
on one of the following sequences: (1) English Literature, (2) Ameri- 
can Literature, (3) Writing and Language, (4) Drama and Theatre. 
The student should also arrange, when possible, for the intelligent cor- 
relation of her sequence with other subjects. Details concerning these 
sequences may be obtained at the office of the Department of English. 
In preparation for the departmental examination, the major in English 
will be assigned to a tutor, with whom she will work individually and 
in small groups in English 449. 

105. An Approach to Narrative 

The course, intended primarily for freshmen who do not plan to 
major in English, is designed to give the student a knowledge of 
various types of narrative and to stimulate purposeful and discrim- 
inating reading for pleasure. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Gould. 

107r. Introduction to the Dramatic Arts 

An elementary course in the nature of the theatre: its materials, 
its methods, its literature. The varied aspects of the theatre will be 
studied, with selected plays used as illustrative material. Intimate ac- 
quaintance with theatre problems will be supplied by crew work. Pre- 
requisite, permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Thirty 
crew hours per semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 



SPEECH 

lllr. Oral Composition 

The theory and practice of speech communication. The gathering 
and organizing of materials; special stress on vocabulary building, and 
on the principles and technique of composing and projecting effective 
speech. Training in diction and stage presence. Subject matter for 
practice speeches is varied to suit all types of formal and informal pub- 
lic address. Whenever possible this subject matter is related to current 
work in Freshman English. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Taylor, Miss England, Mr. Bowman, Mr. Fitz- 
patrick. 



Department op English 119 

215. Speech for Drama and Radio 

A fundamental course designed to develop the technique needed for 
these media of communication ; the mechanism of the voice ; enunciation 
and pronunciation ; tone, color, pitch, dialects. Two hours, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Fitzpatrick. 

21 7r. The Speaking Voice 

The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; enunciation 
and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; with exercises designed to 
overcome the defects of the individual voice. Two hours, either semes- 
ter. Credit, two semester hours. Miss England. 

219r. Speech Clinic 

Remedial speech work for students with speech defects. This work 
will be adapted to the varying needs of class members. Students are 
expected to come into the class of their own accord or upon recom- 
mendations of advisers, department heads, or interested faculty mem- 
bers. Certain students who elect English 217 may be placed in this 
special class. Two hours, each semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Taylor. 

220r. Oral Interpretation 

A course designed to develop proficiency in reading and in the oral 
interpretation of literature. Prerequisite, English 217 or permission of 
the instructor. Two hours, either semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss England. 

229r. Fundamentals of Speech 

The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; enunciation 
and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; application in the reading of 
prose and verse. A basic course designed for those who are planning 
to meet the recommendations for teacher education and open to other 
students as an elective. A student who has had 217 will not be ad- 
mitted to this course. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss England. 

367. Storytelling 

A study of the art and technique of storytelling; of the material 
available in the field; practice in the telling of stories. Required of stu- 
dents in the interdepartmental major in Recreation; elective for others 
with the approval of the instructor. Two hours, first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss England, Mr. Fitzpatrick. 



120 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

WRITING AND LANGUAGE 

221. Advanced Composition 

A writing course for students beyond the freshman year. Reading, 
class discussion, and practice in the writing of essays, criticism, and 
other forms of exposition. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Summerell, Mrs. Rogers. 

222. Advanced Composition 

Practice in descriptive and narrative writing, with emphasis upon 
the technique of the short story. May be elected independently of Eng- 
lish 221. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Summerell, Mrs. Rogers. 

223. Journalism I 

An elementary course in journalistic writing, with special emphasis 
on the gathering and writing of news. Analysis of formal and informal 
stories of news and the analysis and writing of feature articles and 
editorials. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Dunn. 

224. Journalism II 

A continuation of Journalism I, with emphasis upon the editorial 
point of view. Further study and writing of the forms of news-stories. 
Emphasis on the understanding and practice of the reading of copy and 
proof and of headline-writing and make-up. (Students who may be 
called upon later to help others in the publication of high school news- 
papers and magazines should find the course helpful.) Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. 

313. The English Language I 

The origin and nature of language. The Indo-European languages. 
Readings in Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, and early Modern English 
to show the influence of these on current English. The influence of 
other languages on English — especially Greek, Latin, and French. 
Simple and compound words, prefixes and suffixes, etymology. Phon- 
ology, morphology, word-finding, problems in usage, proper names. Lin- 
guistic laws. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Wilson. 

314. The English Language II 

Semantics. Restrictions on language. Current influences on English. 
A Study of British and American dictionaries: merits and defects; 
editors and their policies; diacritical marks and phonetic alphabets; vo- 
cabulary, definitions, synonyms, idioms, standards of pronunciation. 



Department of English 121 

Variant and disputed pronunciation; the pronunciation of classical 
words in English context; historical background of spelling, simplified 
and phonetic spelling, variant and preferred spelling, plurals, spelling 
rules. Readings in good English to illustrate its qualities. Language 
and international affairs. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Wilson. 

325. The Writing Workshop 

A laboratory writing course devoted to the writing of fiction and 
verse. The work will be centered around class discussion of students' 
work and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite, the 
completion of either English 221 or English 222, or permission of the 
instructor. Mr. Jarrell, Mrs. Rogers. 

326. The Writing Workshop 

A continuation of English 325. Prerequisite, permission of the in- 
structor. This course may be elected independently of English 325. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jar- 
rell, Mrs. Rogers. 

425. The Writing Workshop — Advanced 

A continuation of English 325, a course reserved for those young 
writers who have been encouraged to continue creative work through 
a second year. Prerequisites, English 325 and permission of the head 
of the English department and the instructor. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mrs. Rogers. 

426. The Writing Workshop — Advanced 

A continuation of English 326 and 425, a course reserved for those 
young writers who have been encouraged to continue creative work 
through a second year. Prerequisites, English 326 and permission of 
the head of the English department and the instructor. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mrs. Rogers. 

319. English Grammar 

A brief course in modern English grammar; the relationship of 
grammar and composition. Designed for prospective teachers who have 
taken or are taking courses in advanced composition. Credit will not 
be given for both 319 and 321. One hour, first semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Mrs. Painter. 

321r. Grammar and Composition 

The content of the course includes the principles of grammar and 
rhetoric and weekly compositions illustrative of the fundamentals of 
writing. This course satisfies the state requirement for prospective 
teachers of English. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Dunn. 



122 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

THEATRE 
231. Acting 

Fundamental acting techniques. Theory and practice in vital ex- 
pressiveness of thought and emotion through voice and body under 
special conditions. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Fitzpatrick. 

317. Radio Production 

A practical course covering the problems faced by the radio director 
and the producer. All important types of broadcasts and specific prob- 
lems of each type are studied. Each student must direct and produce 
programs during laboratory sessions. Opportunity to develop and ex- 
periment with new or original techniques is encouraged. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Fitzpatrick. 

318. Writing for Radio 

A basic course in writing designed to acquaint the student with prob- 
lems and demands of the radio medium. All important types of con- 
tinuity and script are studied. Students write a minimum of one script 
each week. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Fitzpatrick. 

327. Play Production 

A practical study of problems and techniques involved in the con- 
struction and painting of scenery, stage lighting, make-up, costuming, 
and stage design. Qualified sophomores will be admitted to this course 
by permission of the instructor. One lecture and four laboratory hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Mr. 
Bowman. 

328. Play Production 

Although this course is a continuation of 327, it may be elected as 
a separate course. Qualified sophomores will be admitted to this course 
by permission of the instructor. One lecture and four laboratory hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Mr. 
Bowman. 

329. Play Writing 

Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 

330. Play Writing and Advanced Production 

Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique continued. 
The number of students admitted to the course must be limited to 
twelve. Meritable scripts written by students in this class and in Eng- 
lish 329 will be given production. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 



Department of English 123 

332. Play Direction 

A study of modern methods and techniques in the direction of plays, 
with extensive practice in actual direction of both short scenes and com- 
plete one-act plays. Three lecture-laboratories, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 

333. History of the Theatre 

Intended to give the student a knowledge of the specific conditions 
under which the great plays of the western world have been produced. 
A consideration of audience, actors, patrons, the physical conditions, 
architecture, and the relation of the theatre to the various arts. Projec- 
tion of the production of representative plays, which the student will 
read. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Taylor. 

LITERATURE 

271. The Literary Study of the Bible 

A study of the Bible as a part of the world's great literature. This 
course seeks to give the student a fuller comprehension of the Bible 
through a more intelligent appreciation of its excellencies of form and 
structure. Representative masterpieces will be considered — among them 
essays, orations, stories, and poems. Two hours, first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

272. The Literary Study of the Bible 

A continuation of English 271. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

301. European Literary Masterpieces 400-1600 

A reading course designed to acquaint the student through transla- 
tions with the outstanding monuments of our western literary heritage. 
Literature originally written in English will be excluded. Emphasis 
upon the understanding of complete texts. A consideration of Dante, 
Erasmus, Montaigne, Cervantes, and others. Prerequisite for sopho- 
mores, B or better in English 102. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. 

302. European Literary Masterpieces, 1600-1900 

A continuation of English 301. A consideration of Moliere, Vol- 
taire, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Stendhal, Tolstoy, Zola, and others. 
Prerequisite for sophomores, B or better in English 211. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. 

311. Readings in English and American Literature 

Designed to allow the student to follow and to develop her reading 
interests in an informal way. The students will meet in small groups, 
membership in which will be determined by common interests. Designed 
especially for the non-English major. Especially qualified sophomores 
will be admitted to this course by permission of the instructor. One 
hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Painter. 



124 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

312. Readings in English and American Literature 

A continuation or a repetition of English 311. This course may be 
elected by students who have had English 311. One hour, second semes- 
ter. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Painter. 

336. Chaucer 

A study of the major and certain of the minor poems of Chaucer, 
with literary rather than linguistic emphasis. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Summerell, Mr. Bridgers. (In 
1949-1950, Mr. Bridgers.) 

337. English Literature to 1500 

An introduction to the culture of the Middle Ages. Selected readings 
in English literature from Beowulf to Malory: epic and romance (with 
special emphasis on the Arthurian legend), tales, ballads, lyrics, the 
church drama; a consideration of some of Chaucer's poems in their 
relation to other works of the same types. Works in Anglo-Saxon and 
some of those in Middle English in translation. Some attention to com- 
parative materials in other literatures and to medieval themes and 
forms in later English literature. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Bridgers. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

338. Literature of the English Renaissance 

English literature from 1500 to 1610. A consideration of the prin- 
cipal dramatists other than Shakespeare and of Elizabethan non-dra- 
matic poets. In addition, some consideration of the prose, including 
translations of the Bible. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Gould. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950; offered in 1950-1951.) 

339r. Shakespeare 

A study of twelve representative plays: Richard III, Henry IV 
(Part 1 or Part 2), Henry V, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Mer- 
chant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, The Tempest, As You Like 
It, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra. Three 
hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender, 
Mr. Bridgers, Mrs. Spivey. (In 1949-1950, first semester, Mrs. Spivey; 
second semester, Mr. Bridgers.) 

340. Advanced Shakespeare 

The following were studied in 1945-1946 : Richard II, Twelfth Night, 
Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Julius Caesar, Winter's Tale, Sonnets, 
Measure for Measure. Prerequisite, English 339. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. 

(Offered in 1949-1950; not offered in 1950-1951.) 



Department of English 125 

341. Milton 

Milton's major poetry in its seventeenth-century setting in poetry 
and philosophy. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Rowley. 

(Offered in 1949-1950; not offered in 1950-1951.) 

342. The Seventeenth Century 

A consideration of the major writers in England from 1610 to 1700. 
Particular attention to Bacon, Browne, Dryden, Butler, Milton's prose 
and minor poems, seventeenth-century lyricism; some attention to the 
drama of the Restoration. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Rowley. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950; offered in 1950-1951.) 

357. Contemporary Poetry 

A study of strictly contemporary poets whose writings reflect the 
changing aesthetic, social, political, and ethical conventions of our pres- 
ent civilizations. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jarrell. 

358. Contemporary Poetry 

A continuation of course 357. This course may be elected also by 
those who have not had 357. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell. 

359. The Eighteenth Century 

English literature from 1700 to 1785. Particular attention to the 
periodical, to Pope, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, and Burke; some con- 
sideration of eighteenth-century drama, especially of the plays of Far- 
quhar, Goldsmith, Sheridan. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Painter. 

343. Wordsworth and Coleridge 

An intensive study of the works of Wordsworth and Coleridge, with 
attention to the development of the Romantic movement. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

344. The Later Romanticists 

The major poems of the later Romantic poets and some prose of the 
period. May be elected independently of English 343. Three hours f sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

345. Victorian Literature 

The important writings (exclusive of the novel) of the era between 
1832-1880. Although some attention will be given to the historical and 
cultural aspects of the age, the major emphasis will be upon the lit- 
erature. The following are among the main figures studied: Tennyson, 



126 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Browning, Arnold, Swinburne, Rossetti, Elizabeth Browning, Carlyle, 
Macaulay, Ruskin, Newman, Morris, Clough. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Bush. 

347. The English Novel Through the Nineteenth Century 

An historical and critical study of the English novel from its begin- 
ning through Thomas Hardy, with emphasis on the novel in the nine- 
teenth century. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Hurley. 

348. The Modern Novel 

Intended to introduce the student to notable novelists of the twen- 
tieth century and to help her evaluate modern novels in terms of modern 
life as well as of literary art. Emphasis on continental novels, with 
some comparative study of a few English and American novels. Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Spivey. 

362. Modern English Literature 

English literature since 1885. Consideration of the outstanding 
writers — essayists, novelists, dramatists, and poets. Among those studied 
are: Conrad, Galsworthy, Joyce, Hudson, Strachey, Shaw, Synge, Hous- 
man, Eliot. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Hurley. 

351. American Literature to 1850 

American culture and literature from 1667 through Emerson. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the expansion of the American mind in the 
writings of Benjamin Franklin, Freneau, Brown, Irving, Cooper, Bryant, 
Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whittier, Thoreau, and Emerson. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

352r. American Literature from 1850 to 1900 

American literature from the middle of the nineteenth century to 
1900. Emphasis upon the effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction; 
upon the local color movement; upon the rise of realism, the develop- 
ment of the social revolt, and the beginnings of naturalism. Among the 
authors studied are: Lowell, Longfellow, Holmes, Melville, Whitman, 
Lanier, Mark Twain, Howells, James, Lafcadio Hearn, Henry Adams, 
Crane, Norris, and Emily Dickinson. Three hours, either semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. First semester, Mr. Hurley; second semes- 
ter, Mr. Hall. 

354. American Literature of the Twentieth Century 

American literature from 1900 to the present. The aim of the course 
is to trace the main currents of thought in the more significant works 
of American poets and prose writers during the first four decades of the 
twentieth century. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Hurley. 



Department of Geography 127 

353. Studies in American Literature 

In 1949-1950, novel; 1950-1951, poetry; 1951-1952, drama. In 1949- 
1950 the course will be an intensive study of aspects of the American 
novel. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Hurley. 
382. The Modern Drama 

The drama of the late nineteenth century and of the twentieth cen- 
tury. A consideration of plays by such representative writers as Ibsen, 
Hauptmann, Sudermann, Strindberg, Gorky, Tolstoy, Chekov, Brieux, 
Rostand, Maeterlinck; D'Annunzio, Pirandello, Synge, Yeats, O'Casey, 
Wilde, Shaw, Barrie, Galsworthy, Molnar, O'Neill. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. W. R. Taylor. 

384. The Short Story 

The history and development of the short story, with analysis and 
discussion of the best classic and contemporary stories, both European 
and American. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Rowley. 
388. Literary Criticism 

A study of selected critical writings from Plato to Conrad. Particu- 
lar attention to English criticism, and to the writings which will assist 
the student in the formulation of her own critical attitude. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Bush. 

449r. Co-ordinating Course 

The co-ordinating course is designed to give the student opportunity 
to organize significantly her work in her major subject and to co-ordi- 
nate this with work in other subjects. The course is conducted by the 
tutorial method. Required of all senior English majors. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Bush, Mr. Painter, 
Miss Summerell, Miss Gould. 
493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

Associate Professors Arundel (Head of the Department), 
Phillips. 

101r. Introduction to Geography 

This course is designed to acquaint the beginning student with the 
physical landscape of many parts of the earth. It encourages an interest 
jin strategic locations, in peoples of many lands, in maps and their 
uses, in world climatic regions, and in man's responses to his physical 
environment. Designed mainly as a freshman elective. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel, Mr. 
Phillips. 



128 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

211-212. Elements of Geography 

A geographic interpretation of such elements of man's physical en- 
vironment as planetary relations, climate, surface configuration, native 
vegetation, soil, and mineral resources. Two lecture hours and one three- 
hour laboratory for the year. Not open to those who have had geogra- 
phy 335. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 each semes- 
ter. Mr. Phillips. 

237r. Economic Geography 

The geography of economic production. Important raw commodi- 
ties — such as food, textiles, fibers, timber, and minerals; the distri- 
bution of selected examples of the major types of manufacturing indus- 
tries; and the relation between resources, manufacturing, trade, trade 
routes, and national policies and development. Required of sophomores 
pursuing the course in secretarial administration. Three hours, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel, Mr. Phillips. 

335r. General Geography 

A study of the fundamental distribution patterns of the world. 
Natural features — especially climates, landforms, vegetation, and soils 
— are studied with a view toward broadening the background for the 
various fields of college work. Not open to students who have had 
Geography 211-212. Required of all candidates for primary, grammar 
grade, and high school certificates to teach general science. Two lec- 
ture hours and three laboratory hours, either semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Arundel. 

336. Elements of Regional Geography 

Description and analysis of the major regions of the world with 
particular emphasis upon human settlement and the use of the lands. 
Prerequisite, Geography 335 or 211-212. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel. 

339. Geography of Latin America 

A study of the physical, economic, political, and social background 
of Latin America, showing present conditions and possibilities of future 
development, with emphasis on the relation of Latin America to the 
United States. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Phillips. 

341. Geography of Europe 

An analysis of the influences of climate, surface features, and nat- 
ural resources on the distribution of peoples, their industries and routes 
of trade. Consideration will be given to each country within its regional 
setting and to the relationship of Europe to the remainder of the world. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Phillips. 



Department of German 129 

345. Geography of Anglo-America 

A regional study emphasizing the relationships that exist between 
the natural environment and the human activities in each of the geo- 
graphic regions of Anglo-America. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Arundel. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Assistant Professor Barrett (Head of the Department). 

Students who do not offer any German for entrance will take Ger- 
man 101-102. Students offering two and three units of German will take 
German 103-104 or 205-206, according to ability. 

Not all courses 205-401 will be given in any one year; a selection 
meeting as far as possible the needs and desires of the students will be 
made. As far as is practicable, German will be the language of the 
classroom. 

101-102. Elementary German 

Essentials of grammar, graded reading, vocabulary building. Poems 
memorized. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

103-104. Intermediate German 

First semester, grammar review, intensive and rapid reading. Second 
semester, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell or its equivalent. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

205-206. Introduction to German Literature: The Classical Period 

Representative works in prose and verse. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

209-210. Scientific German 

At the discretion of the instructor, the course may be taken instead 
of German 103-10 U. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Barrett. 

21 lr. Elementary Composition and Conversation 

This course may be pursued with German 103 as a sophomore elec- 
tive. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

301r. History of the German Language 

History of the sounds and inflections of the modern idiom from the 
beginnings. Development of the lexicon. Prerequisite, two years of col- 
lege German, or its equivalent. Three hours, either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 



130 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

315-316. Brief History of German Literature 

A study of the literary movements and of individual authors from 
early times to the present. Majors are required to take this course col- 
laterally with German 317-318. One hour for the year. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

317-318. Survey of German Literature 

A study of literary works, and excerpts from outstanding works, 
exemplifying various movements of German literature and the works of 
individual authors from early times to the present. Majors are required 
to take this course collaterally with German 315-316. Prerequisites, at 
least two years of college German or the equivalent. Two hours for the 
year. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

321-322. Goethe's Life and Selected Works 

A study of the various periods of Goethe's literary activity; read- 
ing of works illustrating different periods of his development. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

325-326. German Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

A study of selected works of representative writers, particularly in 
the fields of the drama and the novel. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

329r. German Classics in English 

A general-culture course designed to acquaint the student with rep- 
resentative works of German literature. Lectures and discussions on 
works assigned and on the literary movements in German from medieval 
times to the present . Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Barrett. 

331. Leasing and his Time 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

332. Schiller's Life and Selected Works 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

401r. Goethe's "Faust" 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 



Department of Health 131 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Medical Division: Dr. Collings (Head of the Depart- 
ment), Dr. Doran, Dr. Garrard. 

Health: Associate Professor Harris; Assistant Profes- 
sors Dalrymple, Shamburger, Clements. 

101r. Health 

A course designed to place before each student the ideal of a well- 
balanced program for daily living and to emphasize her obligation to 
serve society by the promotion of individual, family, and public health. 
Required of all freshmen except those in the home economics course. 
Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Har- 
ris, Miss Dalrymple, Miss Shamburger, Miss Clements. 

103r. Health 

A study of the basic principles of health maintenance and promo- 
tion. Required of all one-year commercial students. Two hours, either 
semester. Miss Shamburger. 

234. Community Health 

A study of the broadening scope of community health, the attack 
of official and voluntary agencies upon major health problems, and the 
responsibility of the individual in the community health program. Pre- 
requisite, Health 101, or its equivalent. Three hours second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Harris. 

236. First Aid 

First aid, theory and demonstrations, and practice. Official course 
leading to Red Cross standard certificate. Required of juniors in physi- 
cal education. Elective for others. One hour, first semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss Dalrymple. 

369r. Child Health 

Development and care of the child from prenatal life through adol- 
escence. Prerequisite, Health 101 or Physiology 277. Three hours, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Harris. 

364. Medical Information for Social Workers 

Medical background for social case work. A survey of modern 
methods of medical diagnosis and treatment, with special emphasis on 
diseases likely to be encountered by the social worker. Restricted to 
students specializing in the field of case work. Open to others only by 
special permission. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Dr. Collings, Dr. Doran. 

367. Health Education 

The application of scientific knowledge to the study of health prob- 
lems of the individual, and the community, and methods and materials 
in teaching health in secondary schools and college. Required of juniors 



132 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education course. Prerequisites, 
Health 101, Education one course, and General Biology or Chemistry. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Clements. 

341r. Principles and Methods in Health Education 

A study of health problems; ways of determining health needs; 
health inspection; methods and materials for health teaching in ele- 
mentary and grammar grades. Required of all majors in elementary 
and grammar grade education. Prerequisites, Health 101, Education 
one course, and General Biology or Chemistry. Three hours, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Clements. 

343. Pharmacology and Therapeutics 1 

The properties, action, therapeutic effect, toxicology, and the mathe- 
matics involved in administration of medicines and in preparation of 
solutions. Required of all juniors in Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 
Four hours, first semester. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Dalrymple. 

345. History of Nursing 2 

The development of nursing and its relation to religion, ethics, 
science, social institutions, and attitudes through centuries. The inherit- 
ance of the nurse, her qualifications and opportunities in the world of 
today. Required of all juniors in Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Two 
hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Dalrymple. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors Johns (Head of the Department), Gullander, 
Pfaff ; Associate Professors Largent, Draper ; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Hege, Bardolph, Hocker, O'Boyle; Instructor 
McLeod. 

HISTORY 

101-102. Modern European Civilization 

The study of European civilization from the eighteenth century to 
the present. A secondary aim is to interpret present-day institutions 
and problems in terms of their origins and developments. For freshmen. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Fee, 55 cents 
each semester. Mr. Johns, Mr. Pfaff, Miss Gullander, Miss Largent, 
Miss Draper, Miss Hege, Mr. Bardolph, Mr. Hocker, Miss O'Boyle, Mr. 
McLeod. 



1 Open to students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Laboratory Technicians. 
2 Open to students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing course. 



Department of History and Political Science 133 

105r. Current Events and Problems 

An elementary survey of events of current interest, emphasizing 
particularly causes of conflict between nations and social and economic 
problems of present-day American life. Magazines and newspapers will 
serve as texts. Elective for freshmen and sophomores. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Fee, $1.25. Instructor 
to be announced. 

211. The United States to 1865 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of 
the period. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Johns, Miss Draper, Miss Largent, Mr. Bardolph. 

212. The United States Since 1865 

A continuation of 211. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Johns, Miss Draper, Miss Largent, Mr. Bardolph. 

213r. The United States Since 1865 

Special emphasis will be placed upon the economic development of 
the United States during this period and its effect upon the position of 
the United States in world affairs. Designed primarily for majors in 
Business Education; elective for others who have not had History 212. 
Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hege. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All elective courses numbered "200" require one year of history as 
prerequisite except by permission of the head of the department. All 
elective courses numbered '300" require one year of history and junior 
or senior standing except by permission of the head of the depart- 
ment and the instructor concerned. 

283. Current Problems 

A study of current affairs, particularly those of an economic and 
social character. Leading periodicals as texts. One hour, first semes- 
ter. Credit, one semester hour. Fee, $1.25. Instructor to be announced. 

284. Current Problems 

A continuation of History 283. One hour, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Fee, $1.25. Instructor to be announced. 

331. An Introduction to Historical Method 

Emphasis will be placed on the study of the materials of history and 
the techniques of historical research and writing. Particularly recom- 
mended for those planning to do graduate work. Designed primarily 
for history majors but open to others with permission of the instruc- 
tor. One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Largent. 



134 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

337. The American Colonies 

Special emphasis on the social and economic development of the 
English colonies through the American Revolution. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johns. 

338. Latin-American History 

A survey of the social, economic, and political development of the 
Latin-American republics. Special attention will be given to the rela- 
tions of these countries to the United States. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hocker. 

345. North Carolina 

A general survey of the history of North Carolina from colonial 
times to the present. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

347. The South 

A study of the part the South has had in the history of the nation, 
with special emphasis on the period since the Civil War. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johns. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

348. The United States Since 1918 

An intensive study of the history of the United States during the 
last quarter century. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Hege. 

349. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States to 1865 

A historical view of the development of American society, with 
emphasis on the life of the people, and the influence of changing reli- 
gious, artistic, literary, sociological, and economic currents. Prerequi- 
site, History 211, except by special permission of the instructor. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bardolph. 

350. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States 1865-1918 

A continuation of History 349, but may be taken separately. Empha- 
sis will be placed on the development of modern American life. Pre- 
requisite, History 212, except by special permission of the instructor. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bar- 
dolph. 

353. Ancient Civilization 

A survey of the Ancient World with particular attention to the 
political and cultural development of Greece and Rome. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. McLeod. 



Department of History and Political Science 135 

354. Medieval Civilization 

A survey of Europe in the Middle Ages with emphasis on the cul- 
tural aspects of medieval civilization and the beginning of modern 
states. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. McLeod. 

355. The Renaissance 

A study of the background, causes, and progress of the intellectual 
and cultural movements in Europe in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and six- 
teenth centuries. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Draper. 

356. The Reformation 

A study of the Reformation period in European history. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Draper. 

361. The Age of Absolutism 

A survey of the Age of Louis XIV and the Old Regime in Europe. 
Emphasis will be placed upon French development as typical of Europe. 
The perfection of absolutism in government and the beginnings of lib- 
eralism in thought will be considered. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Largent. 

368. The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era 

Emphasis will be placed upon the struggle for social, economic, and 
political democracy during the Revolution and the advancement or 
negation of progress toward these goals under Napoleon. The pattern 
of dictatorship as established in France and elsewhere in Europe will 
also be studied. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Largent. 

369. Europe in the Nineteenth Century 

Emphasis will be placed upon social, cultural, and intellectual his- 
tory. Works of leading thinkers will be read and discussed. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Pfaff. 

370. Europe in the Twentieth Century 

A continuation of History 369, but may be taken separately. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Pfaff. 

373. England from Ancient Times to 1600 

A survey of origins and evolution of English culture. Emphasis on 
economic, social, and intellectual life, with some consideration of politi- 
cal institutions. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Gullander. 

374. England from 1600 to the Present 

A continuation of History 373. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Gullander. 



136 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

376. Russia Since 1815 

A survey of recent Russian history designed to give the student an 
understanding of contemporary Russia. Approximately one-third of the 
course will be devoted to the period since 1917. Main emphasis will be 
placed on social and political institutions and on foreign policy, par- 
ticularly in the Near East. Some time will be spent on economic devel- 
opment and on Communist theory. Prerequisites, History 101-102 and 
junior or senior standing. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss O'Boyle. 

382. Far Eastern Civilization 

A general survey of the cultures of India, China, and Japan in their 
historical development. Attention will be given to the impact of West- 
ern civilization upon the Orient and the conflict of rival imperialisms 
preceding World War II. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Hocker. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 1 

Associate Professor Alexander; Assistant Professor 
Bardolph. 

321. The Federal Government 

A study of the government of the United States. Origin, organiza- 
tion, and development will be emphasized. Special attention will be 
given to government in action and to administration. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander, Mr. Bardolph. 

322. State and Local Government 

A continuation of Political Science 321 with attention paid to the 
same functions of government in the state and local fields. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander, Mr. 
Bardolph. 

324. World Politics 

In this course a survey will be made of the development of the world 
state system. International law, diplomatic relations, power politics, 
and efforts to achieve world organization will be studied. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. 



a Political Science courses are counted as History on the maximum but not on the 
minimum requirements for a major in History. 



Department of Home Economics 137 

325. Municipal Government 

A study of the forms, functions, and powers of municipal corpora- 
tions and the problems of municipal administration. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

327. American Political Parties 

A study of the development and organization of political parties. 
Special attention will be given to campaigns, elections, and political 
machines. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Alexander. 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors Margaret Edwards (Head of the Depart- 
ment), Swanson, Penn, Kremer; Associate Professors Play- 
foot, Street, Coxe, Rosa, Howell; Assistant Professors 
Kehoe, Lowe, Hathaway, Shelden, Surratt, Cox; Instruc- 
tors Beaman, Singletary; Assistants Livingston, Newton; 
Graduate Assistants Sherrill, Keller, Krahnke, Lucas, 
Hunter. 

The Department of Home Economics offers both undergraduate and 
graduate courses in its various subject matter fields, leading to the 
Bachelor's and Master's degrees. 

The subject matter fields of home economics include foods, nutri- 
tion, clothing, textiles, housing, management, household economics, 
home relationships, and child development. The scientific, economic, 
social and aesthetic factors of each subject are studied in relation to 
personal, home, and professional living. 

The general education requirements of this program include courses 
in the humanities, the biological and physical sciences, and the social 
sciences. 

The specialized curricula in home economics prepare for many- 
careers and professions, including homemaking, public school and col- 
lege teaching, co-operative extension service, nursery school education, 
adult education, nutrition education, public health education, food dem- 
onstration work, hospital dietetics, school lunchroom management, com- 
mercial food service, institution house administration, clothing and 
textile designing, textile testing, merchandising, interior decoration, 
experimental laboratory work, and home economics journalism. See 
page 66. 

Courses listed under Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate may be 
taken for graduate credit, provided an additional problem, equivalent 
to one semester hour of work, is approved by the instructor and satis- 
factorily completed. 



138 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

GENERAL COURSES 
FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
lOOr. Introduction to Home Economics 

Basic principles of room furnishing, clothing selection and groom- 
ing, money management and buying principles, social customs and eti- 
quette, and personal relationships. Elective for freshmen and sopho- 
mores other than home economics majors. Three lectures, either semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Fee $2.00. 

300r. Principles of Home Living 

Basic principles pertinent to clothing the family, feeding the family, 
house planning and furnishing, consumer buying, budgeting, child care 
and training, and family relationships. Elective for junior and senior 
students other than home economics majors. Three lectures, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

400r. Special Problem in Home Economics 

An individual problem to be selected by the student under the guid- 
ance of the adviser. The problem will be worked out under the super- 
vision of an assigned staff member. Conference hours to be arranged, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

501 r. Special Problem in Home Economics 

An individual problem of pertinent interest to the student and 
approved by an assigned staff member. Conference hours to be arranged, 
either semester. Credit, one to three semester hours. Assigned staff 
member. 

511r. Thesis Seminar 

Report of progress and discussion of theses and related problems. 
No credit. Assigned staff members. 

530. Fundamentals of Laboratory Research in Home Economics 

Methods of research adapted to the different subject matter fields of 
home economics, to develop the scientific approach and techniques neces- 
sary for research. Prerequisite, basic sciences, with approval of the 
instructor. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $^.00. Assigned staff 
member. 

550r. Thesis Problem 

Individual guidance in the thesis problem. Either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Thesis adviser. 



Department of Home Economics 139 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILE COURSES 
FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

lOlr. Clothing Construction and Selection 

Fundamental principles in the selection, purchase, and construction 
of clothing and textiles for the individual. One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratories, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Miss Beaman. 

301r. Pattern Study and Construction 

The foundation pattern, flat pattern construction; and the construc- 
tion of garments from designed patterns. Prerequisites, Home Econom- 
ics 101 and Art 101 or approved equivalents. One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratories, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee $2.00. Misses Coxe and Shelden. 

311r. Costume Design and Construction 

The application of art principles to dress designing and construc- 
tion. Prerequisites, Art 101 and Home Economics 301. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory , either semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Misses Coxe and Shelden. 

341r. Textiles 

The study of textiles from raw materials through construction; 
identification; analysis; choice, use, and care of fabrics. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory, either semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Shelden. 

351r. Clothing Selection and Care 

The selection, purchase, and care of the individual's wardrobe with 
special emphasis on personal development and improvement. Planned 
primarily for other than home economics majors. Three lectures. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Shelden. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 
331. History of Costume 

The historical, literary, and artistic background of the costume of 
various countries from early civilization to the present. Prerequisite, 
History 101-102. Three lectures, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Coxe and Miss Beaman. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

401. Advanced Clothing Construction 

The development of appreciation of line, form, texture, and color 
through draping and creative construction. Prerequisite, Home Eco- 
nomics 311. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. 



140 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

411. Advanced Costume Design and Construction 

Advanced study of costume design and creative construction; their 
relation to art principles, fashion, materials, the human form, and acces- 
sories. Prerequisite, Home Economics 401. One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratories. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Coxe. 

421. History of Textiles 

The historical and artistic background of textiles of various coun- 
tries from early civilization through modern times. Selected field trips. 
Prerequisite, History 101-102. Three lectures, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Coxe and Miss Beaman. 

451. Clothing the Family 

The selection, purchase, construction, care, and budgeting of the 
family clothing in relation to family needs and income. One lecture and 
one three-hour laboratory, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Coxe. 

461. Clothing and Textile Economics 

The economic and social aspects of production, distribution, use, and 
care of clothing and textiles. Three lectures, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Coxe. 

FOR GRADUATES 
441. Textile Analysis 

Advanced study of textile fibers and fabrics through standard test- 
ing. Prerequisites, Home Economics 341, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104, 
Physics 301 or approved equivalents. One lecture and two three-hour 
laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Miss Shelden. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION COURSES 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

103r. Food Selection and Preparation 

Standards of selection, purchase, preparation, storage and service 
of food. Prerequisite, General Chemistry or approved equivalent. One 
lecture and two three-hour laboratories, either semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4-00. Miss Howell and Mrs. Surratt. 

21 3r. Nutrition 

Fundamental principles of nutrition, food preparation, and meal 
planning as related to health and efficiency. Prerequisite or parallel, one 
year of science. Required of physical education majors and elective to 
other majors of junior and senior rank. Three lectures, either semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cox. 



Department of Home Economics 141 

303r. Meal Study 

The planning, marketing, selection, storage, preparation, and serv- 
ice of food, for different occasions at different cost levels. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 203 or approved equivalent. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $4-00. Miss Howell. 

31 3r. Nutrition and Dietetics 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and their application to the 
planning of adequate dietaries for normal individuals and family groups 
of different economic levels. Prerequisites or parallels, Chemistry 225 
and 326 or approved equivalents. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Miss Cox. 

353r. Food Preparation and Meal Service 

The planning, selection, preparation and service of food for family 
meals and special functions. Planned primarily for other than home 
economics majors. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Mrs. Surratt. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

323r. Experimental Food Study 

Experimental study of factors regulating standards of food prod- 
ucts and their preparation. Prerequisites or parallel, Home Economics 
313 and Physics 301 or approved equivalents. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.00. Miss Howell. 

403r. Diet Therapy 

The modification of normal diet to meet the dietary requirements of 
pathological and special conditions. Prerequisite, Home Economics 313. 
Three lectures. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cox. 

413. Nutrition of Development 

The nutritional needs and development of the child from conception 
through adolescence. Prerequisite, Home Economics 313. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Cox. 

433. Food Economics 

Food production, distribution, storage and selection; markets and 
marketing; food standardization and prices; food utilization in the 
home. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Howell. 



142 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

447. Food Demonstration Techniques 

Methods of food demonstration with actual experience. Prerequi- 
site, Home Economics 313. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss 
Howell and Miss Cox. 

FOR GRADUATES 

443. Problems in Foods and Nutrition 

The study of family dietary standards, emphasizing food values, 
meal planning adapted to different income levels. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Hours to be arranged. Miss Howell and others. 

513. Nutrition Seminar 

Reports and discussion of recent advances in nutrition. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 



HOUSING AND MANAGEMENT COURSES 
FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

205r. The House and Its Furnishings 

The planning, furnishing, and renovation of houses and their com- 
ponent parts in relation to individual and family needs and income. 
Prerequisite, Art 101 or equivalent. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Miss Hathaway. 

335. Home Crafts 

Home craft problems applied to dress, dress accessories, and home 
furnishings are discussed, designed, and executed. One lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Miss Beaman. 

355r. Planning and Furnishing the House 

The aesthetic, economic, and practical problems involved in planning 
and furnishing a livable home. Planned primarily for other than home 
economics majors. Three lectures, either semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Hathaway. 

405r. Home Management House Residence 

Application of principles of management by residence in the Home 
Management House. Group conferences. Nine weeks, either semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 



Department of Home Economics 143 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

305. Housing 

The economic and social significance of modern housing. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 205 or by approval. Two lectures, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Kremer. 

(Not offered 1949-1950.) 

315. History of Furniture 

The historical background of furniture of various countries from 
early civilzation to modern times. Field trips required. Prerequisite, 
History 101-102. Three lectures, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Hathaway. 

(Not offered 1949-1950.) 

325r. Household Economics 

Principles and problems of the consumer-buyer; organization and 
management of household activities, time, labor, and income as they 
affect family relationships. Prerequisite or parallel, Home Economics 
405. Four lectures, nine weeks, either semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mrs. Street. 

415r. Household Equipment 

The selection, operation, care, and arrangement of household equip- 
ment in relation to income, time, and labor. Prerequisite, Physics SOlr 
or approved equivalent. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory, 
either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mrs. Street. 

435. Advanced Home Furnishing 

Advanced study of aesthetic, economic and practical problems in- 
volved in furnishing a livable home. Creative problems which include 
practical experience will be executed. Field trips required. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 205. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Hathaway. 

445. Problems in Family Finance 

Budgeting, accounting, credit, investment, and control of property 
as they affect the control of family income. Two lectures, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

(Not offered 1949-1950.) 



144 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FOR GRADUATES 

402. Social and Economic Problems of the Family 

A seminar on present-day home and family living as affected by 
social and economic factors. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Kremer. 

455. Problems in Household Economics 

A seminar on present-day household management problems. Three 
conferences each week, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Kremer. 

465. Problems in Housing and Furnishing 

Individual problems in modern housing and furnishing in relation 
to income, efficiency, and the family will be discussed and developed. 
Credit, two semester hours. Hours to be arranged. Miss Hathaway. 

505. Advanced Home Management 

Special studies of home management house problems will be made 
under supervision. Prerequisite, Home Economics 405 or approved 
equivalent. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

515. Advanced Household Equipment 

This course will include the study of modern household equipment, 
emphasizing selection, arrangement, use and care for the high school 
home economics department. Prerequisite, Home Economics hi 5r, or 
approved equivalent. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

525. Work Simplification 

Study of the practical problems of home management in relation 
to their being solved efficiently and with a saving of time and labor. 
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Credit, two semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. Street. 

535. Problems in Home Crafts 

Advanced problems in home crafts applied to dress and house with 
emphasis on advanced weaving. One lecture and one three-hour lab- 
oratory per week. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Beaman. 

605. Housing Seminar 

This course will consider the present housing situation, the present 
housing market, materials, planning, financing, and the contributions 
of home economics to the housing program. Outstanding specialists 
will be brought in to discuss specific problems. Credit, two semester 
hours. Hours to be arranged. 



Department of Home Economics 145 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HOME 
RELATIONSHIPS COURSES 
FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
302r. Child Development 

The physical, mental, and social development of the child in the 
home. Prerequisite, Psychology 221 or approved equivalent. Four lec- 
tures and observation in nursery school for nine weeks, either semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa, Mrs. Singletary. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 
41 2r. Home Relationships 

The relationships of parents and children as they are affected by 
modern living. Prerequisites or parallels, Home Economics 302 and 
Sociology 321 or approved equivalents. Four lectures for nine weeks, 
either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

FOR GRADUATES 
502. Problems in Child Development 

The interrelationships of the growth, behavior, and care of the 
young child in the light of recent research. The student will do super- 
vised observation in the nursery school. Prerequisite, Home Economics 
302 or approved equivalent. Group conferences, with observation to be 
arranged, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION COURSES 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

307r. Teaching Methods in Home Economics 

Principles of education applied to the field of home economics teach- 
ing. Prerequisite or parallel, Psychology 222r or Education 350 or 
approved equivalents. Three lectures, either semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Playfoot. 

467r. Supervised Teaching in Home Economics 

Principles of teaching applied to situations found in the secondary 
school. Nine weeks, either semester. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Playfoot, Mrs. Kehoe, and others. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 
417 Family Life Education 

Methods of teaching family life education. Prerequisites or paral- 
lels, Home Economics 302 and 4.12. Group conferences each week with 
observation and experience to be arranged, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 



146 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

437. Nursery School Education 

The theory and practice of nursery school teaching. Prerequisites or 
parallel, Home Economics 302 and U12 or approved equivalents. Group 
conferences each week with experience in the nursery school, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa, Mrs. Singletary. 

487. Methods in Adult Homeiuaking Education 

Adult homemaking education with emphasis on organization of 
classes, teaching materials, and teaching techniques. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mrs. Rosa. 



FOR GRADUATES 

507. Curriculum Seminar 

The review and application of current developments in the testing 
and measurement of instruction as they apply to the second and third 
year of work in the state course of study. Credit, three semester hours. 
Hours to be arranged. 

527. Problems in Home Economics Education 

Individual problems as they relate to the teaching of home economics. 
Credit, three semester hours. Hours to be arranged. 

537. Problems of the Supervisory Teacher in 
Home Economics Education 

The problems and methods of supervision as they relate to student 
and teacher growth; school organization; supervision of student teach- 
ing, correlation of subject matter and experiences in the school, home, 
and community; the integration of the whole school program. Group 
conferences, with observation and experience to be arranged, first semes- 
ter. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Playfoot. 

557. Educational Measurements in Home Economics 

This course presents the problems of measurements in home eco- 
nomics; the construction, interpretation, and use of test data in evalu- 
ation of program and student growth. Two lectures. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. 

607. Audio-Visual Education in Home Economics 

This course will include the importance of visual education in home 
economics teaching, emphasizing the taking of pictures, lettering and 
mounting pictures, the use of the projector, film selection, the effective 
filing of materials, and use of other visual aids. Two lectures. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mrs. .Kehoe. 



Department of Home Economics 147 

INSTITUTION ECONOMICS COURSES 
FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

309r. Quantity Food Preparation 

The selection, preparation, and service of food on the quantity basis. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 303 or approved equivalent. One lecture 
and two three-hour laboratories, either semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratoy fee, $4,00. Miss Penn. 

419. Institution Management 

The organization and administration of institution feeding and hous- 
ing. Prerequisite, Home Economics 309 or by approval. Two lectures 
each week, junior year, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Penn. 

420r. Institution Buying 

Selection, purchase, and care of institution foods and equipment. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 4.19. This course is taken parallel with 
Home Economics 429. Two lectures, either semester. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Penn. 

429r. Supervised Institution Experience 

Directed experiences in managerial problems of institution feeding. 
Prerequisite or parallel, Home Economics 419. Either semester. Credit, 
Three semester hours. Miss Penn and others. 

439. Institution House Administration 

The furnishing, maintenance, and administration of institution 
housing. Prerequisite or parallel, Home Economics 420. Three lectures, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

FOR GRADUATES 

409. Advanced Quantity Food Preparation 

Advanced problems in the standardization, preparation, and cost of 
food on the quantity basis. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss 
Penn. 

540. School Food Service 

A study of the selection, purchase, preparation, and service of food 
for school lunch rooms. Special emphasis will be placed on rural school 
feeding and the use of food surpluses. Two lectures, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Penn. 



148 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Before being admitted to candidacy for the Master's degree in home 
economics, the student must have received a Bachelor's degree in home 
economics or in a related field from an accredited college or university. 
Further information concerning graduate work and requirements for 
the Master's degree may be secured by writing to the Head of the De- 
partment. See also Graduate Division, page 195. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professor Barton (Head of the Department) ; Associate 
Professor Watkins; Assistant Professors Lewis, Grogan, 
Walker. 

MATHEMATICS 

The courses essential to the major, which is based on 101-102 or 
103-104, are 217, 218, 305, 325, 327, 337, 450. 

Students who expect to major in mathematics are urged by the de- 
partment to take Mathematics 101-102; others, including those prepar- 
ing for the sciences, are advised to take Mathematics 103-104. Those 
who plan to use mathematics as their second teaching subject should 
take Mathematics 217, 218, and additional courses to meet require- 
ments. 

101-102. Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 

Algebra, three hours, first semester. Plane Trigonometry, three hours, 
second semester. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Lewis. 

103-104. Elementary Mathematical Analysis 

An introductory course which treats of the graphical representa- 
tion of functions and the elements of trigonometry, analytic geometry, 
and the calculus. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss Watkins, Miss Lewis, Miss Grogan, Miss Walker. 

105-106. General Mathematics, with Applications to Business 

An elementary course planned specifically for those taking the Busi- 
ness Education course. Students taking the B.A. course will be admitted 
only with special permission from the head of the department. It in- 
cludes a review of high school algebra, followed by such topics as 
graphs, progressions, logarithms, binomial theorem, simple and com- 
pound interest, elementary life insurance, annuities, statistical con- 
cepts. Cannot be used as the prerequisite for Mathematics 217. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

217. Analytic Geometry 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or 103-10 U or the equivalent. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 



Department op Mathematics 149 

218. Introduction to the Calculus 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 217. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

305. Solid and Spherical Geometry 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Walker. 

320. College Geometry 

A rapid review of high school geometry, followed by a brief study 
of the modern geometry of the triangle and circle. Prerequisites, Mathe- 
matics 101-102 or 10S-10U and approval of the instructor. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Walker. 

325. Advanced Algebra and Theory of Equations 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 217. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Lewis. 

327. Differential and Integral Calculus 

A continuation of Mathematics 218. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

328. Advanced Analytic Geometry 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 218. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

337. History of Mathematics 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 217. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

341. Statistical Methods I 

An introductory course in statistical methods. Such topics as the 
collection and classification of data, graphical methods, frequency dis- 
tribution, averages, simple linear correlation, the normal curve, and 
measures of reliability will be treated. Designed especially for students 
in other departments who are interested in the fundamental principles 
of statistical methods; cannot be used to fulfill the science require- 
ment for graduation. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Watkins. 

342. Statistical Methods II 

An extension of the methods developed in the elementary course. 
Such topics as time series, multiple and partial correlation, non-linear 
correlation, analysis of variance and covariance, Chi square tests, 
simple index numbers, and sampling will be treated. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 3U1. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Watkins. 



150 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

430. Advanced Calculus 

An extension of the concepts developed in the elementary calculus 
to functions of more than one variable. A study of partial derivatives, 
multiple integrals with their applications; also some elementary work 
in the solution of differential equations. Prerequisite, Mathematics 327 
or the equivalent. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Barton. 

432. Differential Equations 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 327. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

Required of all mathematics majors in the senior year. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 
Other courses will be offered upon request. 

ASTRONOMY 
lOlr. Introduction to Astronomy 

An elementary appreciation course designed to enlarge the student's 
horizon and to give her a permanent and enjoyable out-of-door interest. 
Although the course lays emphasis upon the constellations and their 
stories and upon the bodies in the solar system, it also attempts to give 
the student some sense of the universe as a vast and ordered whole, 
and of our place in this universe. A three-inch telescope and a small 
electrically-driven planetarium are used for demonstration purposes. 
Designed primarily as a freshman elective. Three hours, either semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Lewis. 

310. Elementary Descriptive Astronomy 

An outline of the basic facts in astronomy and its history, with 
constellation study. Designed for those interested in the cultural side 
of science and for prospective teachers of general science and geography. 
This course has no prerequisite in college mathematics and cannot be 
used to fulfill the science requirements for graduation. Elective for 
juniors and seniors and approved sophomores. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Walker. 

312. Descriptive Astronomy 

The practical work includes constellation study, exercises with the 
celestial globe, and elementary observation with field glass and small 
telescope. This course may be used toward a major or minor in mathe- 
matics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or 103 -10 %. Two recitations 
and one two-hour period for laboratory and observational work, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Walker. 



Department of Physical Education 151 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

The headship of this department is vacant but will prob- 
ably be filled in 1949. 

201. Philosophical Synthesis 

An introductory course designed to orient the student to an under- 
standing of organized knowledge. The student will study philosophical 
methods and materials; investigate the unity of organized knowledge 
and the integration of philosophy, science, social science, religion and 
artistic expression; and examine the utility of organized knowledge in 
the solution of practical problems. Open to freshmen and sophomores 
with approval of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

321. Ethics 

Open to sophomores with approval of the instructor. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

360. Classics of Philosophy 

A round-table discussion course based on the reading of complete 
philosophical classics. The objectives will be to master the philosophical 
texts; to discern a philosophical system through the reading of a single 
text; and to relate philosophy to practical life. The course will be based 
on the major works of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augus- 
tine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Mill, and Dewey. 
Open only to juniors and seniors. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Martus (Head of the Department) ; Assistant 
Professors Davis, Potter, Griffin, Leonard, Moomaw, 
Greene, Burdett; Instructors Park, Bleick, Moore, Wolfe, 
Sears, Falloon. 

required courses 

Physical education is required of all students during the freshman 
and sophomore years, and of all commercial students. Not more than 
two semesters of any one activity may be presented for credit. 

Freshman Year: Physical education assignments for new students 
are based on their previous training and experience in physical educa- 
tion and on the record of their physical and medical examinations. These 
assignments are from the courses listed below. 

Sophomore Year: A wide range of choice in the courses listed is 
allowed qualified students. 



152 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES FOR FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 

121, Badminton; 123, Softball; 125, Basketball and Softball; 127, Be- 
ginning Golf; 129, Gymnastics; 130, Field Hockey; 131, Recreational 
Sports; 135, Soccer; 137, Speedball; 139, Fieldball and Basketball; 142, 
Social Dance; 143, Folk Dance; 145, Beginning Modern Dance; 147, 
Square Dance; 149, Tap Dance; 151, Beginning Swimming; 161, Be- 
ginning Tennis; 163, Volleyball; 220, Archery; 227, Intermediate Golf; 
228, Advanced Golf; 246, Intermediate Modern Dance; 248, English and 
American Country Dance; 252, Intermediate Swimming (Lower); 254, 
Intermediate Swimming (Upper) ; 256, Advanced Swimming; 258, Life 
Saving; 262, Intermediate Tennis; 264, Boating and Canoeing; 266, 
Bowling. 

Note: Not more than two semesters of any one activity may be pre- 
sented for credit. Beginning golf is taught on the College course; clubs 
may be rented at a nominal sum. Balls must be furnished by students. 
For intermediate golf classes taught at the College, students must fur- 
nish their own clubs. 

103-104. Body Mechanics for the Individual 

Substituted for regular classwork on the advice of the college physi- 
cian and the head of the department. Students are given individual 
exercise programs based on their particular needs. Those who are 
under the care of an orthopedist may carry out under supervision special 
programs in the swimming pool or corrective gymnasium. May be elected 
by freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors. Mrs. Potter. 

105. Modified Activities 

Substituted for regular classwork on the advice of the college physi- 
cian and the head of the department, for those students for whom a 
program of light activities is recommended. Recreational activities are 
adapted to the needs of the group. Mrs. Potter. 

106. Rest. Mrs. Potter 

107. Physical Education for Commercial Students 

Choice of one of the following activities: swimming, folk and social 
dancing. Required of all commercial students. Two hours for one semes- 
ter. Miss Leonard, Miss Moore. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 
241. Playground Organization and Management 

See page 140. 

334. Camp Leadership 

Lectures, discussions, observations and required readings on camp 
programs, camp organizations and administration, and the place of 
camping in the educational program. Open to juniors and seniors who 



Department of Physical Education 153 

can present adequate skills and interests in such camp activities as 
music, dramatics, crafts, sports, etc. One hour, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss Leonard. 

336. Advanced Modern Dance 

Open only to students who have completed two semesters of the 
Modern Dance or who can demonstrate the necessary skill. Two hours, 
each semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Moomaw. 

337. Life Saving and Waterfront Supervision 

Open only to students who can present the requisite skill in swim- 
ming-. Designed for students interested in camp counselorships and 
summer recreational programs. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss Bleick. 

338. Sports Organization and Management; Tennis 

Designed especially for recreation leaders, camp counselors, high 
school teachers, and social workers. Fundamentals of coaching and 
standards of tournament play with emphasis on the values of health 
protection and ethics of sportsmanship. Open to juniors and seniors 
who pass elementary skills test. One hour, second semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Miss Davis. 

339. Sports Organization and Management; Volleyball and Basketball 

Adapted to meet the needs of recreation leaders, high school teachers, 
and camp counselors. Fundamentals of coaching and officiating in team 
sports. Open to juniors and seniors who meet the skill requirements. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Davis. 

340. Sports Organization and Management; Recreational Sports and 
Softball 

Adapted to meet the needs of recreation leaders, high school teachers, 
and camp counselors. Fundamentals of coaching and officiating in team 
sports and organization and management of recreational games. Open 
to juniors and seniors who meet the skill requirements. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Griffin. 

341r. Principles and Procedures in Physical Education 

Integration of principles in general education and Physical Educa- 
tion Curriculum for Grades I to VI. Required by the State Department 
of Public Instruction for elementary teachers' certificates. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Leonard. 

342r. Folk and Country Dance 

A study of national characteristics of music, costumes, dances, and 
folk arts. Designed for the high school teacher, community worker, or 
recreation leader. Open to juniors and seniors. Two hours, either semes- 
ter. Credit, two seynester hours. Miss Davis. 



154 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

343. Festivals for School and Community 

A study of traditional folk festivals and their adaptation to school 
and community use. Each student is required to write one festival 
based on the semester's study. The student should have had one semes- 
ter in folk dance. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Staff. 

344r. Community Recreation 

A study of the organization and administration of programs in com- 
munity recreation, with observation and practice in group leadership in 
the local community centers and playgrounds. Designed especially for 
recreation leaders, camp counselors, girl scout executives, and com- 
munity workers. Open to juniors and seniors. Two lecture hours, three 
laboratory hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Davis. 

345. Elementary Dance Composition 
See page 155. 

346. Intermediate Dance Composition 
See page 155. 

354. History and Theory of the Dance 
See page 156. 

355. Applied Dance 
See page 156. 

356. Applied Dance 
See page 156. 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The technical courses in physical education are based on the study 
of education and of biology. Courses in language, history, and other 
academic subjects are required in order to secure the cultural back- 
ground essential to women who hope to hold positions in this field of 
education. No student will be permitted to enter upon or to continue 
the work of the course when in the judgment of the college physician 
her physical condition renders it inadvisable. 

Students entering with advance credits from other colleges are asked 
to arrange a conference with the head of the department before regis- 
tering for the major course in physical education. 

For the requirements for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education, see page 67. 

At the beginning of the junior year the professional student in 
physical education may choose either a program emphasizing sports 
teaching, dance education, recreation in physical education or corrective 
physical education. 



Department of Physical Education 155 

A three-weeks camping period at the close of the junior year is re- 
quired of all juniors majoring in physical education. 

111-112. Theory and Practice in Selected Activities 

Field hockey, soccer, swimming, gymnastics, stunts, modern dance, 
tennis, Softball. Required of all freshmen taking Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Education. Five hours, each semester. Miss Griffin, Mrs. 
Potter, Miss Moomaw, Miss Leonard, Miss Davis, Miss Wolfe. 

211-212. Theory and Practice in Selected Activities 

Soccer, fieldball, speedball, volleyball, tap and social dancing, swim- 
ming, modern dance, basketball, folk dance, archery, golf. Required of 
sophomores taking Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. Five 
hours, each semester. Miss Griffin, Miss Leonard, Miss Moore, Miss 
Moomaw, Miss Bleick. 

241. Playground Organization and Management 

The construction and equipment of school and community play- 
grounds, scout organization and leadership; techniques of teaching play- 
ground games, lead-up games to team sports, stunts and relays. Re- 
quired of sophomores taking Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Burdett, 
Miss Davis. 

345. Elementary Dance Composition 

Includes the study of the rhythmic and musical bases of dance, the 
elements of art and theatre in the structure of dances. Required of 
juniors emphasizing Dance Education and open to students who have 
satisfactorily completed Intermediate Modern Dance. One lecture hour 
and two one and one-half hour laboratories, first semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

346. Intermediate Dance Composition 

Includes the study of the historical and anthropological bases of 
dance form from primitive through modern times. Required of juniors 
emphasizing Dance Education and open to students who have completed 
Physical Education 345 or who have special permission of the instructor. 
One lecture hour and two one and one-half hour laboratories, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

348. The Dance Curriculum 

Evaluating and grading dance materials. Teaching methods in mod- 
ern dance, folk, tap, American country, and social dance. The adminis- 
tration of the dance curriculum and the organization and problems of 
the dance production. Required of juniors emphasizing Dance Educa- 
tion. Two lecture hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Moomaw. 



156 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

351. Principles and Methods of Physical Education 

Integration of principles in general education and physical educa- 
tion. Survey of aims and objectives of physical education, general 
methods in education and their application to the teaching of physical 
education. Required of juniors. Two lecture and three laboratory hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Martus. 

352. The Curriculum in Physical Education 

Construction of modern programs in physical education. Study of 
state and city programs. Survey of standard tests of motor ability and 
achievements with adaptation of these to the school program. Required 
of juniors in teacher education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Martus. 

353. The Recreation Program in Physical Education 

A study and general survey of programs in recreation with special 
emphasis on the problems which arise in planning the program. Stu- 
dents who take Physical Education 344 will not receive credit for this 
course. Required of juniors in the sequence of Recreation in Physical 
Education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Davis. 

354. History and Theory of the Dance 

The history and motivation of dance from primitive through present 
times. Study of theories of leading dancers from the beginning of 
theatrical dance through modern times. Required of seniors emphasiz- 
ing Dance Education and open to juniors and seniors as an elective. Two 
lecture hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Moomaw. 

355. Applied Dance 

A co-ordinating course designed to increase skill in technique and 
the use of related art materials. Prerequisite, two semesters of Modern 
Dance or permission based upon demonstrated ability. Open to juniors 
and seniors. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

356. Applied Dance 

A continuation of the first semester course in which more skill and 
maturity in the selection and the use of materials are expected. Open 
to juniors and seniors who have completed Physical Education 355. One 
hour lecture, three hours laboratory, second semester. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Moomaw. 

357. The Corrective Program in Physical Education 

A survey of the need of corrective physical education, including a 
discussion of the aim and objectives and methods of achieving the goals. 
The development of related problems with special emphasis on this area 



Department of Physical Education 157 

of curriculum construction. Required of juniors in sequence of Correc- 
tive Physical Education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mrs. Potter. 

359-360. Techniques and Teaching Methods in Physical Education 
Activities 

Folk dancing, tennis, marching, gymnastics, apparatus, modern 
dance, English country dance, child rhythms, singing games, story plays, 
basketball, field hockey, soccer, baseball, archery. Opportunity for of- 
ficiating in team and individual sports and procedures for the organiza- 
tion of field days, sports days, and play days, festivals. Required of 
juniors. Eight hours, each semester. Credit, four semester hours for the 
year. Miss Martus, Miss Davis, Mrs. Potter, Miss Griffin, Miss Leonard, 
Miss Moomaw. 

376. Kinesiology 

The human bone, joints, and muscles concerned with physical exer- 
cises; the mechanical conditions under which these work; the manner 
in which they enter into the co-ordinate movements of life and of gym- 
nastics and sports. Special emphasis on the application of these prin- 
ciples to the solution of problems of posture and deformities. Required 
of juniors. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mrs. Potter. > 

449. Co-ordinating Course 

The course is designed to co-ordinate the work of the student and 
to serve as a guide in the co-ordination of interpretations, philosophy, 
and understandings in modern physical education. Required of all 
seniors. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Martus. 

461-462. Directed Teaching 

Technique of teaching health and physical education under super- 
vision. Regular observation and teaching in all departments of the 
Curry School, county schools, and college service program. Required of 
seniors. Three hours each semester. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Martus and staff. 

463. History of Physical Education 

The history and literature of physical education, with the study of 
the educational philosophies of Plato and Rousseau, and of the influ- 
ence of these philosophies on current procedures in physical education. 
Required of seniors. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Staff. 



158 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

464. Organization and Management 

A study of the organization of departments of physical education in 
secondary schools and colleges, with comprehensive plans for modern 
gymnasia. The class also studies the co-ordination of departments of 
health, physical education and recreation. Required of seniors in Teacher 
Education. Two lecture hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Martus. 

465. Body Mechanics 

Lectures and clinical practice in exercise for the individual with 
special reference to correction of spine and foot deformities. Required of 
seniors. Two lecture hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mrs. Potter. 

468. Examinations and Measurements 

Physical examinations for children and adults; tests for physical 
fitness, follow-up procedures for special cases. Lectures and clinical 
practice. Required of seniors. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mrs. Potter. 

469-470. Advanced Techniques and Teaching Methods in Physical 
Education 

Modern dance, golf, handball, squash, fencing, bowling, sports coach- 
ing, and officiating. This course includes assisting in college classes in 
physical education and officiating in physical education activities of the 
College and community. Electives are open in handicraft, scouting, golf, 
riding, and canoeing. Required of seniors. Five hours, each semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Moomaw, Miss Griffin, Miss Leonard. 

471. Orthopedic Problems in Physical Education 

A survey of orthopedic defects and kinesiological analysis of correc- 
tive measures which can be used by the teacher of corrective physical 
education. Observation of orthopedic defects and treatment. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Potter. 

476. Problems Seminar 

A general survey of current problems in the field of physical edu- 
cation. The course will provide an opportunity for the senior profes- 
sional student to specialize in a problem of her choice. The emphasis 
of the problem shall be in dance, or body mechanics, or recreation, or 
teacher education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Davis, Mrs. Potter, Miss Leonard, Miss Moomaw. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



Department of Physical Education 159 

The Required Camp Program 

In June of the junior year, professional students in physical educa- 
tion are required to attend a three-week camp period at the Recreation 
Association camp, located in the Battleground area. During this sum- 
mer camp program, the student must successfully pass work in the fol- 
lowing activities: practical camp leadership, volleyball coaching and 
officiating, waterfront supervision, swimming methods, recreational 
sports, boating and canoeing. The student is given instruction in activi- 
ties which can be adapted for use in camps, in practical problems of 
camping and in camp counseling. No academic credit is given for this 
work, but the satisfactory completion of all work is necessary before 
the student can enter the senior year in physical education. Miss Leon- 
ard, Miss Bleick, Miss Wolfe. 

Gymnasium Costume 

Every student in the regular college courses must provide herself 
with a regulation gymnasium oufit as follows: 

Two washable suits $ 8.70 

Regulation shoes 2.90 

Two pairs hose 70 

Combination lock 2.25 

Coat Sweater 2.50 



$17.05 



Students in the Commercial course are not required to purchase 
uniforms before registration. 

Gymnasium suits must be secured after the student comes to college 
from dealers who handle the uniform adopted and required by the 
Department of Physical Education. The combination lock for the gym- 
nasium locker ($2.25) must be purchased with the outfit. 

No swimming suit except a regulation cotton suit may be worn in 
the swimming pool. This suit must be secured through the Department 
of Physical Education. The suit is laundered by the College after each 
swimming period. The cost for the use of this suit is one dollar for the 
year. Students using the pool must also have bathing shoes and cap. 



160 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Associate Professor Reardon (Head of the Department) ; 
Instructors Cox, Schuler. 

Students who may major in physics are advised to take Mathe- 
matics 101-102 or 103-104 in the freshman year, and a course in gen- 
eral physics in the sophomore year. 

101-102. General Physics 

Students taking this general course will be divided into two groups: 
those who take it as an elective with no expectation of doing advanced 
work in science, and those who are majoring in a scientific field. Two 
lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Miss Reardon, Miss 
Schuler. 

*201r. Elements of Meteorology 

Designed to generalize for the student the facts concerning the 
earth's atmosphere and its weather, and to acquaint the student with 
the physical principles underlying atmospheric phenomena. An elec- 
tive for students interested in their environment, and an introduction 
to the subject for students who are interested in weather as a vocation. 
Elective. No prerequisites. Two lecture hours and one three-hour lab- 
oratory, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Miss Reardon. 

205-206. General Physics 

A general course first semester on the mechanics of solids, liquids, 
gases and heat; second semester, electricity and magnetism, sound and 
light. Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or 103-10U. Three lecture hours 
and one three-hour laboratory for the year. Credit, eight semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. Miss Reardon. 

207-208. General Physics 

The combined contents of this course with Physics 101-102 are 
equivalent to Physics 205-206. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102. One lec- 
ture hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Reardon. 

*209r. Photography 

Designed to teach the student the principles of physics involved in 
photography. A foundation for the pursuit of photography as a hobby, 
or for its use as a clinical or research tool, or in the preparation of 
teaching and lecture material. The student must purchase her own 
films and papers. One lecture hour, and two three-hour laboratories, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Miss Reardon. 



J This course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



Department of Physics 161 

211. Experimental Physics 

An advanced course in laboratory technique and manipulation as 
involved in special laboratory problems. Prerequisites, Physics 101-102 
or Physics 205-206 and the approval of the instructor. One three-hour 
laboratory, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Staff. 

212. Experimental Physics 

Similar to Physics 211. One three-hour laboratory, second semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Staff. 

214. Color and Lighting 

The fundamentals of color phenomena and of illumination and their 
applications in the home, in the classroom, on the stage, etc. No pre- 
requisite, but the approval of the department and of the class chairman 
is necessary. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Staff. 

301r. Physics 

Emphasizes those features of physics having greatest application in 
everyday life. Required of the Teacher Training, Foods and Nutrition 
and Housing majors for the Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, 
unless Physics 101-102 is substituted. Open to other students subject 
to the approval of the department and of the class chairman. Two lec- 
ture hours and one three-hour laboratory, either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss Reardon. 

305r. Elements of Aeronautics 

A course designed to give students the fundamentals in navigation, 
aerodynamics, meteorology, and aircraft study which are helpful in 
understanding the theory of flight. During the semester the student 
will spend eight hours at the Greensboro-High Point Airport receiving 
dual flying instructions from qualified instructors. The remaining class 
hours will be scheduled on the campus of the Woman's College. Pre- 
requisites, Mathematics 101-102 or 103-104, Physics 101-102, written 
permission from parents. Flying fee paid to airport. Three lecture 
hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reardon. 

2 310. Advanced Photography 

A logical continuation of Physics 209r, with special attention to the 
conditions which must be met to portray photographically an original. 
Some work in color films. The student must purchase her own films 
and papers. Prerequisite, Physics 209. One lecture hour and two 
three-hour laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss Reardon. 



^his course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



162 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

320. Sound 

An advanced course in sound, including wave motion, transmission, 
absorption, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction phenomena, 
and practical applications. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or 205-206. 
Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Schuler. 

321. Light 

An advanced course in physical optics, including optical instruments, 
spectra, interference phenomena, polarized light, nature of light, absorp- 
tion, and dispersion. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or 205-206. Two lec- 
ture hours and one three-hour laboratory, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Schuler. 

322. Electricity and Magnetism 

An advanced course in electrical and magnetic theories and instru- 
ments, including electron theory, electrolysis, thermo-electricity, elec- 
tromagnetics, and alternating currents. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 
or Physics 205-206. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Reardon. 

323. Heat 

An advanced course in the theory of heat, including thermodynamics, 
molecular physics, quantum theory, and radiations. Prerequisites, 
Physics 101-102 or Physics 205-206, and Mathematics 10B-10U, or their 
equivalents. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, second 
semester. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Schuler. 

324. Mechanics 

An advanced course in theoretical mechanics, including wave motions, 
gyroscopic actions, dynamics of fluids, and quantum mechanics. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 101-102 or Physics 205-206, and Mathematics 103- 
104, or their equivalents. Two lecture hours and one three-hour labora- 
tory, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Schuler. 

326. Electronics 

A course mainly in the properties and practical applications of the 
electron, including thermionics, photoelectricity, cathode rays, X-rays, 
and radioactivity. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or Physics 205-206. 
Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Reardon. 

328. Elements of Radio Communication 

A course of lectures and laboratory work consisting of elementary 
considerations of the fundamental laws and their applications to the 
circuits of modern radio systems. Prerequisites, Physics 101-102 or 



Department of Psychology 163 

Physics 205-206. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Reardon. 

331. Experimental Physics 

A laboratory course which will allow students who have taken 
Physics 211 and 212 to continue laboratory work. Prerequisites, Physics 
211 and 212 and two other advanced courses in physics which have been 
completed or are being taken concurrently. One three-hour laboratory, 
first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Staff. 

332. Experimental Physics 

Similar to Physics 331. One three-hour laboratory, second semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Staff. 

443-444. X-Ray Technique 

A course in the theory of X-rays and practical experience by each 
student in the making of radiographs in all the more common positions 
using hospital-type equipment; the processing of films and instructions 
in the care, use, and dangers of all types of X-ray equipment. The 
student must purchase her own X-ray films. Prerequisites, Biology 271 
and 372 and Physics 101-102 or 205-206. Two lecture hours and one 
three-hour laboratory for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00 each semester. Miss Cox. 

450. Co-ordinating Course: Development of Modern Physics 

A brief survey of fundamental laws in the field of physics and a 
study of the modern theories of matter, electricity, and radiation. 
Required of all seniors majoring in physics. Three lecture hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reardon. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Highsmith (Head of the Department), Duffy; 
Associate Professor Layman; Assistant Professors Horna- 
day, Zimmerman, Eicher; Instructors Huse; Assistants 
Lauten, Davis. 

211-212. General Psychology (Experimental) 

Designed to present the basic principles and methods of psychology 
as an experimental and natural science. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00 a semester. Mr. Hornaday, Mrs. Huse, Miss Davis. 



164 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

221r. General Psychology 

The development of points of view, problems, and methods of psy- 
chology; the fundamental principles necessary for understanding the 
behavior of human beings; the facts and principles of intelligent beha- 
vior, motivation, and personality. Three hours, either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith, Mrs. Layman, Mrs. Zimmerman, 
Mr. Eicher. 

222. Educational Psychology 

The psychological facts and principles in learning, study, individual 
differences, and adjustments. Prerequisite, Psychology 221 or the equiv- 
alent. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Highsmith, Mrs. Layman, Mrs. Zimmerman, Mr. Eicher. 

232. Applied Psychology 

A study of the applications of psychology in industry, personnel 
work, advertising, selling, medicine, law, politics, and athletics. Special 
attention is given to problems of vocational guidance and individual 
efficiency. Prerequisite, one course in psychology. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hotirs. Mr. Hornaday. 

326r. Child Psychology 

A general survey of the development of child behavior. Children of 
different ages will be tested to reveal the status of their development 
in regard to various characteristics of behavior. Emphasis is placed 
upon understanding and dealing practically with the developing person- 
ality of the child. Prerequisite, Psychology 211-212 or 221. Three hours, 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Layman. 

333r. Special Problems in Psychology 

An opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups 
on psychological problems of special interest to them. The work may 
represent either a survey of a given field or an intensive investigation 
of a particular problem. The student should consult the instructor be- 
fore registering for this course. Either semester. Credit, one, two, or 
three semester hours. Staff. 

334r. Special Problems in Psychology 

This course is a continuation of Psychology 333. Either semester. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 333. Credit, one, two, or three semester hours. 
Staff. 

335. Personnel Psychology 

A course designed for students interested in doing personnel work, 
with emphasis on a study of the organization, problems, and practices 
of personnel administration. Prerequisite, Psychology 211-212 or 221. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hornaday. 



Department of Psychology 165 

337r. Mental Measurements 

A study of current methods of measuring mental abilities. Practice 
in the administration and scoring of group and individual tests. Pre- 
requisite, six hours in psychology. Three hours, either semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. Huse. 

340. Measurement in Personnel Work 

The use and construction of tests, and other methods of measurement 
in personnel work. Tests particularly useful in hiring, placing, and 
promoting in industry. Prerequisites, Psychology 211 and 212, or 221. 
Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hornaday. 

341. Abnormal Psychology and Mental Hygiene 

A study of abnormal mental phenomena in their relation to normal 
life, including such topics as sensation; perception; thought, sleep; 
dreams, hypnosis; disassociation; the psychoneuroses ; personality dis- 
orders, especially of childhood; the fundamental principles of mental 
hygiene. Prerequisite, six hours in psychology. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Eicher. 

342. Psychology of Adolescence 

This course deals with developmental characteristics and problems 
of adolescence. Testing devices for studying developmental trends and 
behavior problems will be stressed. Prerequisite, one course in psy- 
chology. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mrs. Layman. 

344. Advanced Educational Psychology 

Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Three semester hours. Mr. 
Highsmith. 

345. The Development of Personality 

A study of factors influencing the development of personality. Pre- 
requisite, six hours in psychology or approval of the instructor. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Duffy. 

347. Motivation of Behavior 

A study of the sources and developments of motives. Prerequisite, 
six hours in psychology. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. 

348r. Behavior Problems 

Study of causes and management of common behavior problems in 
children. Typical cases in various age groups through adolescence will 
be studied in relation to total personality development. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 326 or SU2. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mrs. Layman. 



166 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

350. Schools of Psychology 

A discussion of the major differences in theory of the more promi- 
nent recent "schools" of psychology and of the way in which these dif- 
ferences are reflected in contemporary psychology. Prerequisite, Psy- 
chology 211-212 or 221. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Duffy. 

449. Co-ordinating Course 

Required of majors. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Highsmith. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professors Barney (Head of the Department), Hooke, 
Miller; Associate Professors Hardr£, LaRochelle, Abbott, 
Assistant Professors Cutting, Farinholt, Funderburk, 
Felt; Instructors Escajeda, Hunt, Dickinson. 

FRENCH 
101-102. Beginning Course 

Texts: An elementary French grammar, a reader for beginners, 
and some easy French readings. In this course, special emphasis is laid 
on the fundamental principles of French grammar. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller, Mr. Felt. 

103-104. Intermediate Course 

The regular sections of 103-104 begin with the major emphasis on 
review of the fundamental principles of French grammar and gradu- 
ally devote more time to reading. At least one book on French life and 
customs and one modern literary work will be read outside of class. 
Oral and visual comprehension is stressed. 

Several special sections are available for those whose previous train- 
ing indicates that they will benefit from a different type of teaching 
than that above. The main emphasis from the first is on reading and 
about one thousand pages of text is read outside of class during the 
year. Those continuing French from these sections should enter French 
207. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. Fun- 
derburk, Mr. Hooke, Mr. Hardre, Mr. Felt. 

207. Reading from Earlier Literature 

Reading in chronological order of selections from French literature 
to 1800, with such verb or other drill as seems desirable. Supplementary 
reading in French literary history. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Barney and others. 



Department of Romance Languages 167 

(Students taking 207 and 208 and preparing to teach French should 
take French 209 and 210 or 353-354 or 361.) 

208. Readings from Modern Literature 

Continuation of French 207. Literary readings from 1800 to the 
present. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Barney and others. 

209. Reading and Composition 

Emphasis on language, with composition and conversation based 
partly on the reading of modern French. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 

210. Reading and Composition 

Continuation of French 209. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 

Note: Any combination of 207, 208, 209, 210 may be taken for credit. 

211-212. Intermediate Conversation 

A sophomore elective in French for those who desire to gain pro- 
ficiency in conversation. Students who have completed French 209 and 
210 or the equivalent, but who are not ready for French 351-352, will 
also be admitted. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Mr. Hardre. 

Note: To be credited for requirements for graduation, this course 
should be taken with or after a "200" course. 

325. Survey Course 

Lectures, translations in class, and reports from assigned readings 
on the general development of French literature from the beginning 
to 1600. Designed to give the student a general basis for more specific 
work in literature. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barney. 

326. Survey of Modern French Literature 

A continuation of French 325. An outline of the last three centuries; 
a basis for more specific study. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

327-328. Seventeenth- Century Literature 

Designed to give a comprehensive view of the literature of the 
period and of the conditions under which it was produced. Selected 
works from the following authors: Corneille, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, 
Mme. de Sevigne, Moliere, Racine, La Bruyere, and La Fontaine. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 



168 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

329. Eighteenth-Century Literature 

Primarily a study of Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, and 
others of the Enlightenment who prepared the way for modern demo- 
cracy, liberty, and science. Full attention to drama, fiction, the salons, 
the quarrel of the ancients and moderns, sentimentalism, etc. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

330. Later Eighteenth-Century Literature 

Continuation of French 329. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

331-332. French Romanticism 

A study of the best known poems, novels, and dramas of the first 
half of the nineteenth century. Designed to increase the student's 
critical ability and appreciation of poetry. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 

335-336. French Literature Since 1850 

A study of the better known writers and literary movements to the 
present, such as Zola, Flaubert, Taine, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Anatole 
France; Bourget, Gide; realism, naturalism, impressionism, symbolism, 
surrealism. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

337. Contemporary French Drama 

A survey of French drama from the closing years of the nineteenth 
century to the present. Class discussion and analysis of representative 
plays, reports on supplementary reading. All plays are read in French 
editions, especially those of La Petite Illustration. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 

351-352. Advanced Conversation 

A course conducted wholly in French. Designed to give a more 
intimate knowledge of France as it is today, together with the ability 
to carry on an ordinary conversation in French. Prerequisites, French 
209 and 210 or 211-212. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Hardre. 

353-354. Advanced Composition 

Designed to give the student a comprehensive review of French 
grammar and a thorough grounding in the principles of French com- 
position. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Hardre. 



Department of Romance Languages 169 

355-356. Technical and Business French 

Designed to familiarize the student with the French technical terms 
and constructions in reports on economic life and in administrative docu- 
ments, and to train her in French commercial correspondence. Three 

hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre. 

361. Professional Review of Grammar 

Professional review of one or more elementary and reference gram- 
mars. The main principles of grammar, with a view to organizing and 
extending previous knowledge. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

362. Phonetics 

A course in both scientific and practical phonetics. Beginning with 
the description of correct position of the vocal organs for the reproduc- 
tion of the sounds represented by the symbols of the International 
Phonetic Association, the rules for the pronunciation of single words are 
learned and fixed by much practice in phonetic transcription. The stu- 
dents hear the sounds from records made by native French professors. 
This course should be taken by all those who expect to teach French. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

365-366. French Literature in English 

This course is offered for students who are not prepared to pursue 
the regular courses in French literature or who do not have time for 
extensive work but who wish to become acquainted with masterpieces 
of French literature and those works which have affected the thought 
of the world. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. 

371-372. Choses Franchises 

A general information course on France and the French people. 
There will be some consideration of geography and history as a neces- 
sary background, followed by a study of French national traits, home 
life, and institutions. This course is intended to give the student an 
inspirational background for the study of French similar to that 
obtained by travel, and to give the prospective teacher of the language 
a fund of information useful in her chosen profession. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

374. Montaigne, Voltaire, Anatole France 

A study of the philosophy of these French thinkers. Some works 
will be read in French; others, in English translation. Prerequisite, 
completion of a year's work in a Grade II course in French. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 



170 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

This course will attempt to correlate the student's previous training 
in French and, as far as possible, give her an opportunity to view the 
field as a whole. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barney. 

475. The Early French Novel 

Reading, reports, discussion, and some class translations from the 
sources and beginning of the novel in France to 1800. Three hours for 
the first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

476. Modern French Novel 

Similar to French 475 in method. Both courses should be elected by 
those who wish to acquire ability for extensive private reading. Three 
hours for the second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

SPANISH 
101-102. Elementary Course 

Thorough drill is given in pronunciation, vocabulary building, and 
important principles of grammar. This course is designed to equip the 
student with a solid foundation for more advanced study of the 
Spanish language and literature. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss LaRochelle, Miss Abbott, Miss Cutting, Mrs. Hunt, 
Miss Dickinson. 

203-204. Intermediate Course 

Review of grammar, reading with composition and conversation 
based on texts read. Collateral reading on the art, music, dance, and 
customs of the Spanish people. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss LaRochelle, Mr. Hooke, Miss Abbott, Miss Cut- 
ting, Miss Farinholt, Miss Escajeda. 

305-306. The Spanish Novel of the Nineteenth Century and Composition 

A study of the development of the novel from its early beginnings 
through the nineteenth century. Intensive study of the life and works 
of the nineteenth century novelists. Drill on conversation and composi- 
tion. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss La- 
Rochelle, Miss Farinholt, Miss Escajeda. 

311. Conversation 

Intended primarily for those who desire to gain proficiency in spoken 
Spanish. This class presents a play for the Spanish Night program. 
The work includes oral practice with the phonograph and radio for 
pronunciation and comprehension. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Cutting. 



Department of Romance Languages 171 

312. Commercial Spanish 

The study of Spanish American business correspondence, commer- 
cial documents, export and import practices, advertising, and commer- 
cial radio programs. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Cutting. 

321-322. Contemporary Spanish Novel and Composition 

A special study of the life and representative Works of modern 
novelists. Continuation of drill on conversation and composition. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss LaRochelle. 

(Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

323-324. Spanish Drama and Composition 

History of the development of the drama from the thirteenth cen- 
tury to the present. Intensive study of the life and works of contemp- 
orary dramatists. Free composition and oral reports on assigned topics. 
Three hours, both semesters. Credit, six semester hours. Miss La- 
Rochelle. 

325-326. A Survey of Spanish American Literature 

A study of outstanding writers and movements from colonial times 
through the contemporary period. Analysis of representative works 
will be supplemented by lectures on literary, social, and cultural back- 
grounds and tendencies. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Miss Cutting. 

333. The Renaissance and Golden Age through Cervantes 

Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Farinholt. 

334. The Drama of the Golden Age 

Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Farinholt. 

351-352. Advanced Conversation 

A course conducted in Spanish. Designed to give ability to carry 
on an ordinary conversation in Spanish. The culture of Spanish-speak- 
ing countries will form a basis for discussion. Prerequisites, Spanish 
311, 312 or equivalent preparation. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Escajeda. 

353-354. Advanced Composition 

A comprehensive review of the principles of Spanish grammar, their 
practical application in the construction of sentences, paraphrasing 
from Spanish texts, and free composition. This course should be taken 
by those who intend to teach Spanish. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Abbott. 



172 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

449-450. Co-ordinating Course: Survey of Spanish Literature 

An introduction to the general field of Spanish literature from its 
origins to the present time. Lectures, recitations, and reports in 
English. Collateral reading in English and Spanish. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. 

493-494. Honors Course 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Farin- 
holt and others. 

ITALIAN 
201-202. Beginning Course 

Study of grammar supplemented with reading and conversation. 
The student will be taught to understand simple Italian, spoken or 
written, and to pronounce the language correctly. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 

303-304. Intermediate Course 

This is a continuation of Italian 201-202. After a further ground- 
ing in the principles of grammar, the student will read Dante's Inferno 
and selections from Petrarch, Boccaccio, and other authors. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Johnson (Head of the Department), Moss- 
man; Associate Professor Shivers; Instructors Smith, 
Whatley. 

lllr. Southern Regions 

A study of the natural and human resources of the Southeast in 
order to develop an appreciation and understanding of the culture of 
the region and to consider planning for its social and economic develop- 
ment. Elective for freshmen. Three hours, each semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mrs. Whatley. 

211. Introduction to Sociology 

A general survey of introductory sociology. Factors in the social 
life of man: culture, human nature, collective behavior, communities, 
social institutions, social change. Elective for sophomores. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Moss- 
man, Miss Smith. 

212. Introduction to Sociology 

A continuation of Sociology 211. A study of current social problems, 
with emphasis on problems of readjustment in the postwar period. 
Elective for saphomores. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Mossman, Miss Smith. 



Department of Sociology 173 

321. Principles of Sciology 

A study of the fundamental principles relating to social life and 
social issues. A perspective of the general nature of society as seen 
collectively in terms of social organization and social change. May not 
be taken by students who have credit for Sociology 211. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

322. Social Problems 

A study of the various current social problems and social malad- 
justments. May not be taken by students who have credit for Sociology 
212. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Smith. 

323. Social Psychology 

A study of individual and collective behavior in relation to the 
various social and cultural influences. Emphasis on the social and cul- 
tural aspects of personality and group life. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

324. Rural Social Problems 

Social relationships and social problems of rural life. The whole 
complex of group characteristics, social arrangements, traits, and in- 
stitutions relating to rural living, with especial emphasis on the South. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

326. The Community 

A study of the relation of the individual to the modern community. 
An emphasis on trends in community planning, and the relation of 
such groups as teachers, social workers, and lay persons to community 
life. Prerequisites, Sociology 211 and 212, or 321, or in the case of 
seniors, approval of the instructor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

327. Interracial Relations 

Problems of racial adjustment with emphasis on relations between 
whites and Negroes. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Johnson. 

328. Cultural Anthropology 

A study of man and his works. Human origins, races of man, cul- 
ture, primitive societies, and other social phenomena considered as 
an approach to a better understanding of human personality, group 
life, and civilization in our time. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

333. The Family 

An historical introduction to the institution of the family is fol- 
lowed by a study of the modern American family. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Shivers. 



174 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

335r. Marriage 

A study of the practical problems of courtship and marriage, with 
emphasis on personal relationships. Three hours, either semester. 
Credit three semester hours. Miss Shivers. 

336. Criminology 

A survey of the nature and evolution of crime, causes, examina- 
tion of criminal procedure, and historical development of the methods 
of punishment. Analysis of case studies of delinquents; treatment of 
the criminal. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Shivers. 

339. Introduction to the Field of Social Work 

A general view of the entire field of social work, including historical 
background and the present scope, aims, and methods. Field trips are 
taken to public and private social agencies. Open to majors in sociology 
and others with approval of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

340. Introduction to the Field of Social Work 

A study of the organization and methods of social agencies, with 
special emphasis on the techniques used in treatment in specialized 
fields, including study of local agencies. Open to those who have taken 
Sociology 339. Two class lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory 
period, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

342. Social Problems of Child Welfare 

A discussion of the methods of caring for dependent, neglected, and 
delinquent children with emphasis upon the types of agencies which 
have been established to deal with these problems. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

(Offered in 1950-1951 and alternate years.) 

344. An Introduction to Methods of Social Research 

A study of methods of planning and conducting community surveys, 
and methods of study of social conditions and institutions. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

(Offered in 1949-1950 and alternate years.) 

449. Co-ordinating Course; Sociological Theory 

A seminar in contemporary sociology theories. Required for majors. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

469r. Special Problems in Sociology 

An opportunity for the student to work individually on problems 
of special interest to her. The student should consult the instructor be- 
fore registering. Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Staff. 



School of Music 175 

470r. Special Problems in Sociology 

A continuation of Sociology 469. Prerequisite, Sociology 469. Three 
hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

H. Hugh Altvater, B. A., M. Mus., Dean. 

Professors Altvater, Thompson, Minor; Associate Pro- 
fessor DeVeny; Assistant Professors Holloway, Dickieson, 
Cowling, Weisgarber, Schneck, Phillip Morgan, Kline, 
Atkisson; Instructors Inga Morgan, Wharton, McBane. 

The School of Music offers curricula leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science in Music and Bachelor of Arts with a major in 
Music. 

The School of Music is a member of the National Association of 
Schools of Music. The requirements for entrance and for graduation 
as set forth in this catalogue are in accordance with the published 
regulations of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

All students majoring in music are required to be members of the 
college choir or orchestra unless excused by the dean of the School of 
Music. 

The fees for lessons in applied music (piano, organ, violin, voice, 
violoncello, and wind instruments) are given on page 46. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

For this degree the following majors are offered: Piano, Organ, 
Violin, Violoncello, Voice, Music Theory, Music Education, and Instru- 
mental Music Education. 



176 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



A. MAJOR IN PIANO 1 , ORGAN 2 , 

Freshman S.H. 

Music 101-102, Harmony 6 

Music 111-112, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 4 

Applied Music 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



VIOLIN 3 , OR VIOLONCELLO 3 

Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 

Music 231-232, History of Music 6 

Applied Music 201-202 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Music 211-212, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Physical Education 1 



32 

Junior S.H. 

Music 301-302, Counterpoint ... 4 

Applied Music 301-302 10 

Psychology 221 3 

Music 355-356, Form and 

Analysis 4 

Music Elective 4 

College Elective 3 



33 

Senior S.H. 

Music 401-402, Composition ... 4 

Applied Music 401-402 10 

Music 455-456, Instrumentation. 4 

Music Electives 9 

College Elective 3 



28 



30 



B. MAJOR IN VOICE 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101-102, Harmony 6 

Music 111-112, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 4 

Voice 103-104 4 

Piano 113-114 2 

English 101-102 6 

German 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 

Music 231-232, History of Music 6 

Voice 203-204 4 

Piano 213-214 2 

English 211-212 6 

French 6 

Music 211-212, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Physical Education 1 



32 



33 



1 Students majoring in Piano who are deficient in sight-reading must pursue a regular 
non-credit course in this field until the music faculty passes favorably upon their sight- 
reading ability. Piano majors are required to participate in ensemble group rehearsals 
at the request of their teacher. 

^Students majoring in Organ must elect Music 323-324. 

3 Violin and Violoncello majors are required to play in ensemble groups at the request 
of their teacher. 



School of Music 



177 



Junior S.H. 

Voice 303-304 8 

Psychology 221 3 

Italian 6 

Music Electives 8 

College Elective 3 

Music 311-312, Sight-Sing- 
ing and Ear-Training 2 



Senior S.H. 

Music 301-302, Counterpoint . . 4 

Music 355, Form and Analysis . 2 

Music 435, 436, Conducting 4 

Voice 403-404 8 

Music Electives 7 

College Elective 3 



30 



28 



A candidate for the degree in Voice must demonstrate her ability 
to play piano accompaniments of average difficulty before the com- 
pletion of her course. 



C. AND D. MAJORS IN MUSIC EDUCATION 
C. General Course 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101-102, Harmony 6 

Music 111-112, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 4 

Piano 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 

Music 231-232, History of Music 6 
Music 211-212, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Piano 201-202 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Physical Education 1 



32 

Junior S.H. 

Music 311-312, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Music 315-316, Elementary 

School Music Methods 6 

Music 335-336, Orchestral 

Instruments Class 4 

Voice 305-306 4 

Music 325-326, Vocal Technique 2 

Psychology 221-222 6 

Music 355, Form and Analysis . . 2 

Music 302, Counterpoint 2 

Music 435-436, Conducting 4 



33 

Senior S.H. 

Music 445-446, High School 

Methods 4 

Voice 405-406 4 

Music 425-426 2 

Music 465, Supervised 

Teaching 3 

Violin 475-476 4 

Music 455-456, Instrumentation 4 

Education 350 3 

Education 317 or 481 3 



32 



27 



178 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



D. Instrumental Supervision Course 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101-102, Harmony 6 

Music 111-112, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 4 

Major Orchestral Instrument 

107-108 4 

Piano 117-118 2 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 

Music 231-232, History of Music 6 
Music 211-212, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Major Orchestral Instrument 

207-208 4 

Piano 217-218 2 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Physical Education 1 



32 

Junior S.H. 

Music 311-312, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Music 315-316, Elementary 

School Music Methods 6 

Major Orchestral Instrument 

307-308 4 

Music 335-336, Orchestral 

Instrument Class 4 

Psychology 221-222 6 

Music 355, Form and Analysis. . 2 

Music 302, Counterpoint 2 

Minor Orchestral Instrument 

(String) 317-318 4 



33 
Senior S.H. 

Major Orchestral Instrument, 

407-408 4 

Music 445-446, High School 

Methods 4 

Music 465, Supervised 

Teaching 3 

Education 350 3 

Education 317 or 481 3 

Music 455-456, Instrumentation. 4 

Music 435-436, Conducting 4 

Minor Orchestral Instrument 

(Brass) 417-418 2 

Minor Orchestral Instrument 

(Woodwind) 317-318 2 



32 



29 



E. MAJOR IN MUSIC THEORY 



Freshman S.H. 

Applied Music 131-132 6 

Music 101-102, Harmony 6 

Music 111-112, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 4 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Applied Music 231-232 6 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 

Music 211-212, Sight-Singing 

and Ear-Training 2 

Music 231-232, History of Music 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Physical Education 1 



32 



School of Music 



179 



Junior S.H. 

Applied Music 331-332 4 

Music 301-302, Counterpoint. . . 4 

Psychology 221 3 

Music 355-356, Form and 

Analysis 4 

Music 455-456, Instrumentation 4 
Electives (3 hrs. must be 

College Elective) 11 



Senior S.H. 

Applied Music 431-432 4 

Music 401-402, Composition ... 4 
Music 351, The Music of 

J. S. Bach 2 

Music 457-458, Advanced 

Orchestration 4 

Music 352, 19th Century 

Romanticism 2 

Music Electives 9 

College Electives 3 



30 



28 



BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

A nonprofessional course planned for students who wish to pursue 
music without the specialization required for the Bachelor of Science in 
Music courses. All requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree must 
be met. All electives must be chosen from the field of liberal arts. 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101-102 6 

Applied Music 109-110, Piano, 
Voice, Violin, Violoncello, or 

Organ 4 

English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201-202 6 

Applied Music 209-210, Piano, 
Voice, Violin, Violoncello, or 

Organ 4 

English 211-212 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Social Science 6 

Elective 2 

Physical Education 1 



31 



Junior S.H. 

Music 231-232 6 

Applied Music 309-310, Piano, 
Voice, Violin or Violoncello, 

Organ 4 

Science or Mathematics 6 

Music 301-302 4 

Electives 9 



Senior S.H. 

Music 401-402, Composition 4 

Applied Music 409-410, Piano, 
Voice, Violin or Violoncello, 

Organ 4 

Science or Mathematics 6 

Electives 16 



29 



30 



180 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES IN MUSIC THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

100. College Choir 

Membership in the choir is open to any student having a voice of 
fair effectiveness, a correct ear, and some knowledge of musical notation. 
Two rehearsals each week. Credit, one semester hour for the year's 
work. Mr. Thompson. 

101. Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 

The individuality and unity of melody, harmony, and rhythm as ele- 
ments of music expression. The course aims to develop the ability to 
recognize, in aural analysis, all the diatonic harmonies in both major 
and minor modes, and to employ them in harmonization of both given 
and original melodies. Emphasis is placed upon the conscious musical 
fact rather than upon the written symbol; hence much original work 
is required. Required of freshmen in the School of Music. Elective for 
students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Three hours, first semester'. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cowling. 

102. Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 

Continuation of Music 101. Required of freshmen in the School of 
Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Prerequi- 
site, Music 101. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Cowling. 

111. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

The singing, recognition, and writing from dictation of all common 
intervals, triads, and rhythms. Required of freshmen in the School of 
Music. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kline. 

112. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

Continuation of Music 111, with inclusion of two- and three-part 
dictation in both major and minor. Required of freshmen in the School 
of Music. Prerequisite, Music 111. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Kline. 

127r. Music Appreciation 

Planned to help the nonmusic student to listen intelligently to music. 
No technical knowledge of music is required for entrance. The instru- 
ments of the symphony orchestra, the various forms of musical com- 
position and the standard symphonic literature. Elective in Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science courses (except Bachelor of Science in 
Music) for freshmen and sophomores. Three hours, either semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 



School of Music 181 

150. College Orchestra 

Players of orchestral instruments are admitted to membership if 
they are able to pass tests given by the conductor. Two rehearsals each 
week. Credit, one semester hour for the year's work. Mr. Altvater. 

200. Ensemble Playing 

Participation in performance of chamber music. Elective for quali- 
fied players on permission of the dean. Two meetings each week. One 
hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours for the year's work. Staff. 

201. Advanced Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 

Application of the principles outlined in Music 101-102 to the study 
of altered chords, chromatic harmonies, remote and enharmonic modu- 
lations. Analysis of Bach Chorales and Grieg Op. 66, etc., as a basis 
for the study of the principles of musical form and harmonic analysis. 
Practice in original composition. Required of sophomores in the School 
of Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Pre- 
requisites, Music 101 and 102. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Cowling. 

202. Advanced Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 

Continuation of Music 201. Required of sophomores in the School 
of Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Pre- 
requisites, Music 101, 102, and 201. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Cowling. 

211. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

The singing, recognition, and writing from dictation of chords of 
the seventh, altered chords, modulation, and more difficult rhythms, in- 
cluding two- and three-part dictation in both major and minor. Required 
of sophomores in the School of Music. Prerequisites, Music 111 and 112. 
One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Kline. 

212. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

Continuation of Music 211. Required of sophomores in the School of 
Music. Prerequisites, Music 111, 112, 211. One hour, second semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Kline. 

231. History of Music 

A general survey of music history before the Christian era. A more 
detailed study of the music and of music history from the beginning of 
the Christian era to the culmination of the polyphonic school as repre- 
sented in the monumental works of J. S. Bach. Through the records and 
scores of the Carnegie Music Library much of the great music of all 
periods is available for illustration and study. Required of sophomores 
in the School of Music. Elective for the students in Bachelor of Arts 
course. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Cowling. 



182 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

232. History of Music 

A study of the musical development from 1750 to the present time. 
Knowledge of the historical background of important works by the great 
classic and romantic composers and an intimate acquaintance with these 
works are required. Required of sophomores in the School of Music. 
Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cowling. 

301. Counterpoint 

Early modal polyphony culminating in the art of Palestrina. Required 
of all juniors in the School of Music with the exception of majors in 
Music Education. Prerequisites, Music 201 and 202. Two hours, first 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

302. Counterpoint 

Analytical study of Bach's inventions and fugues; twentieth-century 
application of the principles of single and reversible counterpoint. 
Required of all juniors in the School of Music, with the exception of 
majors in Voice. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

311. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

Emphasis on the reading of part work suitable for glee clubs and 
chorus work in grammar grades and high school. Special attention to 
harmonic dictation as it bears on the problem of chorus singing. 
Required of juniors majoring in Music Education or in Voice. Pre- 
requisites, Music 211 and 212. One hour, first semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Mr. Kline. 

312. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

Continuation of Music 311. Required of juniors majoring in Music 
Education or in Voice. Prerequisites, Music 211, 212, and 311. One hour, 
second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Kline. 

315. Elementary School Methods and Materials 

Principles, procedures, and materials for carrying on the music pro- 
gram in the elementary grades. Considerable research and observation 
in the Curry School are included. Required of juniors in Music Edu- 
cation. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in Applied Music. Pre- 
requisites, Music 101, 102, 111, and 112. Three hours for the semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Holloway. 

316. Elementary School Methods and Teaching 

A continuation of the study begun in Music 315, with addition of 
practice teaching in the Curry School. Required of juniors in Music 
Education. Open to juniors and seniors in the School of Music. Pre- 
requisites, Music 101, 102, 111, 112, 315. Three hours for the semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Holloway. 



School of Music 183 

323-324. Choir Conducting 

The organization and training of church choirs, the technique of 
conducting and playing the organ at the same time, and a study of 
various liturgies. This course presents a survey of the best material 
available for the average quartet or chorus choir. Required of all stu- 
dents majoring in Organ. Junior and senior elective for students hav- 
ing had one year of organ study. Two hours for the year. Credit, four 
semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

325-326. Voice Technique 

Special attention given to voice building, careful study of diction. 
Required of juniors in Music Education. One hour for the year. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Schneck. 

327. Music Appreciation 

This course will be adapted to the needs of the general college stu- 
dent who wishes to obtain a better understanding of music as an ele- 
ment of liberal culture and to develop the power of listening intelli- 
gently. No technical knowledge is required for entrance. The following 
subjects will be studied: the orchestra and orchestral instruments, the 
materials of music, the fundamental music forms as illustrated in the 
standard orchestral literature. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science courses (except Bachelor of Science in Music). 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Thomp- 
son. 

328. The Music Dramas of Richard Wagner 

The operas of Richard Wagner, beginning with the early operas, 
"Lohengrin" and "Tannhauser," continuing with an intensive study of 
the Nibelungen Ring Cycle, and culminating with "Tristan and Isolde" 
and "Parsifal." The recordings and scores of the Carnegie Music Li- 
brary will be used in this course, which will be largely adapted to the 
broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera House. A brief survey of the 
history of opera from its beginning in 1600 to the time of Wagner will 
precede the study of Wagnerian operas. Elective open to juniors and 
seniors who have had Music 127 or 327. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

(Offered in 1949-1950 and alternate years.) 

329. Music Appreciation, Twentieth- Century Music 

A continuation of Music 327, with emphasis on the music of the con- 
temporary composers, such as Sibelius, Schoenberg, Shostakovich, Hinde- 
mith, Stravinsky, Bartok, deFala, Poulenc, Honegger, Milhaud, and 
others of the European school, and the American composers of the 
twentieth century. Elective for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who 
have had Music 127 or 327. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

(Offered in 1950-1951 and alternate years.) 



184 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

335. Orchestral Instruments — Woodwind and Brass 

Class study of wind instruments, both wood and brass. Each student 
is given opportunity to gain a practical knowledge of several instru- 
ments — a knowledge which will be useful to a student if she expects to 
direct school orchestras. Required of juniors in Music Education. Two 
hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kline. 

336. Orchestral Instruments — Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass 

Class instruction. The object of this course is to give the student a 
working knowledge of the stringed instruments. It aims also to prepare 
her to organize and conduct ensemble classes. Required of juniors in 
Music Education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Dickieson, Miss Cowling. 

338. Community Music 

Attention is given to the means of utilizing the emotional, social 
and therapeutic effects of music in the many phases of community life 
as it functions in the various community situations: in industry, com- 
mercial groups, hospitals, character-building organizations, camps, and 
so on. Elective for juniors and seniors in any department with the 
approval of the instructor and the student's major adviser. Two hours, 
second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kline. 

341. Public School Music 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight-reading necessary for pri- 
mary grade teachers — study of the child voice, rote songs, problems, and 
materials of music in grades one to three. Required for Bachelor of 
Arts students who are preparing to teach in the elementary grades. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Holloway. 

342. Public School Music 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight-reading necessary for inter- 
mediate and upper grade teachers — study of problems and music mate- 
rials in grades four to six. Required for Bachelor of Arts students who 
are preparing to teach in the elementary grades. Prerequisite, Music 
3^1. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Holloway. 

345-346. Piano Teaching Methods 

Classification of fundamental teaching material and the best meth- 
ods of presentation to the child mind. Notation, sight-reading, ear- 
training, rhythm, technique, melody writing, and musical games. Obser- 
vation of children's classes. Open to juniors in the School of Music 
majoring in Piano. Prerequisite, Piano 201-202. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. Atkisson. 



School of Music 185 

351. The Music of J. S. Bach 

A survey of J. S. Bach's works of all types, with an historical and 
technical study of the development of each of the forms used. An ana- 
lytical study of at least one representative work of each type, with spe- 
cial emphasis on the B Minor Mass and the St. Matthew's Passion. 
Required of majors in Theory. Elective for juniors and seniors in the 
Bachelor of Science in Music courses. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 

201, and 202. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Weisgarber. 

352. Nineteenth-Century Romanticism 

A technical and biographical study of Berlioz, Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Brahms, Moussorgsky, and Tschaikowsky. Required of ma- 
jors in Theory. Elective for juniors and seniors in other Bachelor of 
Science and Music courses. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, and 202. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

355. The Forms of Music 

Survey and analysis of the various principal forms of music for 
structure, texture, and content. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, and 

202. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Weis- 
garber. 

356. Analysis in Form and Harmony 

Principles of analysis. Review of the various chords, principles of 
modulation, etc., of classical harmony. Study of representative contem- 
porary harmonic practices to introduce the student to the recent har- 
monic innovations and trends. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, and 
202. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Weisgarber. 

357. Violin Teaching Methods 

Classification of material and methods of presentation. Ability to 
teach both class groups and individual pupils through observation and 
practical experience. Open to juniors majoring in Violin. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Dickieson. 

358. Violin Teaching Methods 

Continuation, on a more advanced plane, of Music 357. Open to jun- 
iors majoring in Violin. Prerequisite, Music 357. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Dickieson. 

401-402. Composition 

Required of seniors majoring in Applied Music except Voice. Elec- 
tive for Bachelor of Arts majors. Practice in composition. Two hours 
for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 



186 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

425-426. Voice Technique 

Continuation of Music 325-326. Required of seniors in Music Educa- 
tion. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Sehneck. 

431-432. Advanced Composition 

A study of the larger forms of musical composition. Designed for 
students who give evidence of marked creative ability. Elective for stu- 
dents who have taken Music U01-U02 or its equivalent. Two hours for 
the year. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

435. Orchestral Conducting 

The technique of the baton, the essential qualities of successful con- 
ducting with direct application to the handling of orchestral groups. 
Conducting practice, followed by detailed criticism by the class and by 
the instructor. Required of Music Education majors. Elective for jun- 
iors and seniors in the School of Music. Two hours, first semester. Credit 
two semester hours. Mr. Altvater. 

436. Choral Conducting 

The essentials of conducting with specific application to chorus direc- 
tion. Study of vowels and consonants and of the relative stresses of 
speech in their relation to choral singing. Coverage of voice placement 
and the principles of choral balance. Study of high school choral liter- 
ature. Conducting practice followed by criticism by the class and by 
the instructor. Required of Music Education majors. Elective for jun- 
iors and seniors in the School of Music. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Holloway. 

445-446. High School Music Methods 

A study of music in junior and senior high schools, including the 
course of study, classes in theory, history, and appreciation; choral 
and instrumental organizations; credit for outside study; extra-cur- 
ricular activities and public performances; and the relation of the 
supervisor to the community and to the various members of the school 
organization. Required of seniors in Music Education. Open to all sen- 
iors in the School of Music. Prerequisite, Music 315-316. Two hours 
for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Holloway. 

455-456. Instrumentation 

Individual characteristics of orchestra instruments; building of the 
orchestral score. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, and 202. Two hours 
for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Dickieson. 

457-458. Orchestration 

A continuation of Music 455-456, with emphasis on scoring of com- 
plete works and the carrying through of projects to actual perform- 
ance. Detailed study procedures of past and present masters of orches- 



School op Music 187 

tral techniques. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, 202, 355-356, 455- 
456. Two hours a week for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. 
Weisgarber. 

B 461-462. Practice Piano Teaching 

Practice of the principles learned in the methods course by the 
teaching of children under the supervision and direction of the in- 
structor of piano teaching methods. Observation of children's classes. 
Open to seniors in the School of Music majoring in Piano. Prerequisites, 
Music 345-346 and Piano 301-302. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mrs. Atkisson. 

B 463-464. Voice Teaching Problems and Practice Teaching 

Analysis of problems in voice production and song interpretation. 
Evaluation of song literature. Observation of teaching and practice 
teaching. Elective for juniors and seniors majoring in Voice. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. DeVeny. 

465. Supervised Teaching 

The daily teaching in various grades and high school of the Curry 
School is prepared for and supplemented by frequent conferences with 
supervisors for constructive criticism and planning of new work. Re- 
quired of all seniors in Music Education. Elective for seniors in the 
School of Music whose minor subject is Music Education. Prerequisite, 
Music 315-316. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Holloway, Mr. Dickieson, Mr. Kline. 

466. Supervised Teaching 

Continuation of Music 465. Elective for seniors in the School of 
Music. Prerequisite, Music 315-316. Three hours, second semester. Credit 
three semester hours. Miss Holloway, Mr. iKline. 

B 467-468. Practice Violin Teaching 

Application of the problems involved in Music 357-358, through the 
teaching of children, under the supervision of the Violin department. 
Orchestra organization and routine through active membership in the 
college orchestra. Elective for seniors in the Violin department. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Dickieson. 



B Note: Music 461-462 or Music 463-464 or Music 467-468, having been elected at the 
beginning of the college year, must be pursued through both semesters before credit 
toward the degree is allowed for either semester of work. 



188 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

"Applied Music" refers to the practical study of piano, organ, voice, 
violin, or orchestral instruments, in private individual lessons. Private 
lessons in applied music are available to students from other depart- 
ments whose courses of study admit of such extra work. 

A student will be accepted into a credit course in applied music only 
after she has passed a test in singing or playing before a committee of 
the music faculty. 

For Freshmen: 

101-102. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. Piano, Course C. 

103-104. Voice. Course B. 

107-108. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

109-110. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

113-114. Piano. Course B. 

117-118. Piano. Course D. 

121-122. Incidental Instrumental Music in all Courses. 

131-132. Applied Music for Course E. 

For Sophomores: 

201-202. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. 

203-204. Voice. Course B. 

207-208. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

209-210. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

213-214. Piano. Course B. 

217-218. Piano. Course D. 

221-222. Incidental Instrumental Music in all Courses. 

231-232. Applied Music for Course E. 

For Juniors: 

301-302. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. 

303-304. Voice. Course B. 

305-306. Voice. Course C. 

307-308. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

309-310. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

317-318. Minor Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

321-322. Incidental Instrumental Music in all Courses. 

331-332. Applied Music for Course E. 

335. Orchestral Instruments: Woodwind and Brass. 
Required in Courses C and D. 

336. Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Bass. 



School of Music 189 

For Seniors: 

401-402. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. 

403-404. Voice. Course B. 

405-406. Voice. Course C. 

407-408. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

409-410. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

417-418. Minor Applied Music. Course D. 

421-422. Incidental Instrumental Music in all Courses. 

431-432. Applied Music for Course E. 

475-476. Violin. Course C. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The list of requirements in applied music as given below is not a 
complete statement of work needed to satisfy credit standards. The 
compositions mentioned are to be interpreted merely as symbols of 
stages of advancement. A committee of music faculty members will 
decide upon each student's qualifications for entrance or advancement. 

PIANO COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales and arpeggios at 
moderate Tempi; Etudes, such as Czerny 299; Heller op. 47; Little 
Preludes and Fugues, Bach; easier Two-part Inventions, Bach; com- 
positions by standard composers equivalent in difficulty to Mozart, 
Sonata in C Major, No. 3; Haydn, Sonata in G minor, No. 11; 
Beethoven, Sonata op. 49, No. 2. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 108. Major and minor, 
dominant seventh and diminished seventh arpeggios. M.M. 72; trill one, 
two, four, eight notes, M.M. 60; legato and staccato octaves at moderate 
speed. Czerny, op. 299 and Cramer; Bach, Two-part Inventions, early 
sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, compositions of equal difficulty 
from romantic and modern schools. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

Sophomore Year: Technical work continued; scale M.M. 132. 
Cramer; Czerny op. 740; Bach, Three-part Inventions; easier dance 
movements from French suites; Beethoven Sonatas op. 14, No. 1; op. 
14, No. 2; romantic and modern compositions. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 144; scales in thirds, 
sixths, tenths, M.M. 132; other technical work continued. Czerny, op. 
740; Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; French and English suites; 
easier preludes and fugues from W. T. C, Bach; more difficult Beetho- 
ven sonatas; compositions by Schumann, Schubert, Chopin, Rubinstein, 
Liszt, MacDowell, Debussy and others. Five hours for the year. Credit, 
ten semester hours. 



190 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Senior Year: Technical work continued; Bach, preludes and fugues 
from W. T. C; Chopin Etudes, a wide repertoire embracing a sonata, 
concerto, and pieces by classic, romantic, and modern composers. Gradu- 
ation recital appearance. Five hours for the year. Credit, ten semester 
hours. 

VOICE COURSE 

Freshman Year: Voice classification. Tone production and diction 
study. Song literature from the Italian operatic and oratorio repertoire 
of the seventeenth century. Study of Old English classics. Two hours 
for the year. Credit, four semester hours. 

Sophomore Year: Emphasis on development of legato singing and 
flexibility as elements of technique. Choice of song literature determined 
in large measure by state of development in the use of foreign lan- 
guages. Two hours for the year. Credit, four semester hours. 

Junior Year: Emphasis on vocal agility, volume, range, and quality 
of tone. Third year of study should disclose the potentialities of the 
voice. In addition to study of more advanced works in foreign lan- 
guages, modern American and English songs are given increased 
attention. Operatic and oratorio arias required at this stage of develop- 
ment. Four hours for the year. Credit, eight semester hours. 

Senior Year: The main emphasis is upon the interpretive aspects 
of singing and development of the student's capacity to sing with style 
and distinction. The repertoire is general and is governed by special 
capabilities of the student. A graduation recital appearance is required. 
Four hours for the year. Credit, eight semester hours. 

VIOLIN COURSE 

Entrance Requirements : The student should be able to pursue to her 
advantage the study of the 42 Etudes of Kreutzer. A previous thorough 
study of the Kayser op. 20, the Mazas Special Studies, and the Dont 
Exercises Preparatory to Kreutzer is recommended. 

Freshman Year: Careful review of previous technical study. Sevcik 
trill studies. Kreutzer etudes. Three octave scales and arpeggios. Con- 
certos of Bach, Viotti. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. 

Sophomore Year: Kreutzer and Fiorillo etudes, double stop studies. 
Concertos, Spohr, No. 2 ; Viotti, No. 22. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

Junior Year: Rode Caprices. Concertos, Bruch, Mendelssohn; so- 
natas, Tartini and Corelli. Five hours for the year. Credit, ten semester 
hours. 



School of Music 191 

Senior Year: Bach solo sonatas. Selected great concertos and sona- 
tas. Smaller modern works. Graduation recital appearance. Viola study 
required. Five hours for the year. Credit, ten semester hours. 

VIOLONCELLO COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales in two octaves; 
ability to play musically the Corelli Sonata in D minor, or a classic 
work of similar type; technical ability to play the Goltermann Concerto 
No. 4 or the equivalent. The student should be in a position to pursue 
to her advantage the course for the freshman year outlined below. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales in three octaves; scales in 
broken thirds and arpeggios ((Klengel, Technical Studies, Vol. I) ; Lee, 
op. 31, Book II; Detzauer, 113 Exercises for Violoncello, Book II. Bach, 
Suite I in G Major. Sonatas by Corelli, Eccles, Handel, Marcello. 
Pieces by Bach, Goltermann, Popper, etc. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. 

Sophomore Year: Major and minor scales in four octaves; scales 
in thirds and arpeggios. Merk, Op. 11; Duport, 21 Etudes; Grutzmacher, 
Op. 38, Book I. Bach, Suite II in D minor. Sonatas by Sammartini, Mo- 
zart-Cossado, Beethoven (Op 5 No. 1 or 2), Mendelssohn, Strauss. 
Boellmann, Symphonic Variations. Pieces by Bach, Faure, Guerini, 
Mendelssohn (Op. 17), Saint-Saens, etc. Three hours for the year. 

Credit, six semester hours. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales in sixths, octaves, and double 
stops. Grutzmacher, Op. 38, Book II; Franchomme, Op. 7; Piatti, Op. 
25. Bach, Suite III in C major. Sonatas by Beethoven (Op. 69), Grieg, 
Rachmaninoff. Concertos by Boccherini and d' Albert, Lalo or Saint- 
Saens. Pieces by Bach, Bloch, Granados, Senaile, Schumann (Op. 70, 73, 
or 102), etc. Five hours for the year. Credit, ten semester hours. 

Senior Year: Major and minor scales with spiccato and other special 
bowings. Orchestral studies, Bach, Suite IV in E-flat major or Suite V 
in C minor. Sonatas by Beethoven (Op. 102, No. 1 or 2), Brahms 
(Op 38), Debussy, Delius. Concertos by Haydn and Elgar or Schumann. 
Pieces by Bach, Beethoven (Variations), Bloch, Bassado, Chopin (Op. 
3), Dvorak, etc. Graduation recital appearance. Five hours for the 
year. Credit, ten semester hours. 

ORGAN COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: The completion of the freshman require- 
ments in Piano of this College or their equivalent. 

Second Year: The foundations of organ technique are laid by the 
study of simple exercises in legato, pedal, and manual playing by 
Stainer, followed by the Caspar Koch Pedal Scales, the completion of 



192 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

at least four of the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues by Bach, easy 
preludes and offertories, and intensive study of the art of hymn play- 
ing. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 

Third Year: Completion of the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues by 
Bach, and at least two of the more difficult preludes and fugues, such 
as the Cathedral Preludes and Fugue in E minor, and the Short G 
minor Fugue, one of the easier sonatas by Mendelssohn or Guilmant, 
standard pieces of the German and French school. Choir accompani- 
ments. Keyboard modulation and transportation. Five hours for the 
year. Credit, ten semester hours. 

Fourth Year: Larger preludes and fugues by Bach, sonatas and 
compositions by Widor, Vierne, Bonnet, Karg-Elert, and others of the 
modern school. Oratorio accompaniments. Graduation recital appear- 
ance. Five hours for the year. Credit, ten semester hours. 

COURSE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

To major in Music Education, the student must have completed the 
work of the freshman year in the School of Music, including fresh- 
man piano; must have an acceptable singing voice; a high degree of 
skill in sight-singing and ear-training; and a personality that shows 
promise of successful teaching ability. 

RECITALS 

RECITAL ATTENDANCE 

Students pursuing regular courses in the School of Music are re- 
quired to attend all faculty and student recitals and the performances 
of the College Concert Course. 

STUDENT RECITALS 

Student recitals are given weekly, at which time works studied in 
the classroom are performed before the students of the Department 
of Music. All students majoring in music are required to attend these 
recitals and to take part in them when requested to do so. These public 
appearances are of great assistance in enabling the student to acquire 
the poise essential to a successful public performance. 

ARTIST RECITALS AND CONCERTS 

No less important than classroom instruction is the opportunity of 
hearing good music performed by artists of superior ability. To afford 
students this opportunity, a regular series of recitals and concerts is 
given annually, the best artists available being secured. 



School of Music 193 

Recitals and concerts are given frequently during the school year 
by members of the music faculty. 

CARNEGIE MUSIC LIBRARY 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York City in 1935 awarded to 
the Woman's College a "College Music Set" consisting of a library of 
826 records, 250 music scores, 125 books on music-history and apprecia- 
tion, and a Capehart reproducing machine. This award is valued at 
$2,750. 

Two rooms in the Music Building have been set aside as a library 
to house this valuable collection. The library is kept open daily, not 
only for the students of the music history and appreciation classes, 
but also for students and members of the College community who may 
wish to acquaint themselves with the music of the great masters. 

ANNUAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC CONTEST-FESTIVAL 

One of the major activities sponsored by the School of Music for 
the improvement of music in the state is the Annual North Carolina 
Music Contest-Festival for High Schools. District elimination contests 
for the town and consolidated high schools are held in six centers 
in the state, and those schools with high scores in these district contests 
enter the annual state contest held at the College in April of each year. 
These annual performances have given the music teachers, supervisors, 
and students a splendid opportunity to compare their work with that 
done in the other schools. The contest has in this way made a real con- 
tribution to the rapid development of music in the schools of the state. 

ORGANIZATIONS 
THE COLLEGE CHOIR 

The College Choir is composed of one hundred and fifty college stu- 
dents, selected from the entire student body. Two weekly rehearsals 
are held, and college credit of one semester hour is granted for one 
whole year's work. The choir sings in chapel many times during the 
year, for the four university sermons, the baccalaureate sermon, and 
other important college events. In addition, at least two special con- 
certs are given each year, one a special Christmas concert, the other 
an Easter program. The choir is under the direction of Mr. Thompson. 

THE ORCHESTRA 

Membership in the College Orchestra is open to all students who 
play an orchestral instrument sufficiently well to meet the requirements 
of the director. Two rehearsals are held each week throughout the col- 



194 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

lege year, and attendance is required of students who are studying an 
orchestral instrument. Public concerts are given during the college 
year as often as circumstances warrant. One semester hour's credit is 
granted for two semesters' work in the orchestra. 

PI KAPPA LAMBDA 

Membership in this national honorary scholastic society is the high- 
est honor that can come to a student in the School of Music. Election 
of students is from the senior class, with an occasional election from 
the junior class, and is based primarily on superior ability and attain- 
ment. Alumnae and faculty members of the School of Music who have 
achieved special distinction in the field of music are eligible for election 
to membership. 

MUSIC EDUCATION CLUB 

The Music Education Club is an organization of the Music Educa- 
tion Department. Membership of the club is made up of sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors who are majoring or minoring in music education 
and faculty members of this department. Freshmen interested in music 
education may be associate members. The club's activities are planned 
to enrich the musical experience of the members and to broaden their 
interest and pride in their prospective profession, to familiarize them 
with current developments in the field of music education, and to pro- 
mote musical interest and activities on the campus. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE DIVISION 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President. 
Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Chancellor, Woman*s College. 
William Whatley Pierson, Ph.D., Litt.D., Dean, Graduate School. 
Franklin H. McNutt, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Associate Dean. 

THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE 

Margaret M. Edwards, B.S., M.A., Professor of Home Economics. 
Albert S. Keister, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
Vance T. Littlejohn, B.A., B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Professor of Business 

Education. 
Franklin H. McNutt, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Education. 
Eugenia McIver Hunter, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Education. 

ORGANIZATION 

Under a principle of the Consolidated University of North Carolina 
known as "allocation of function," the Woman's College Division of the 
Graduate School of the University is authorized to conduct graduate 
study in three areas: namely, Business Education, Elementary Educa- 
tion, and Home Economics. These areas and the Division as a whole 
are represented in and subject to the Graduate Executive Council of 
the Consolidated University. Fundamental policy and basic regulations 
are formulated by this Council and may be found in the Graduate 
School Series of the University of North Carolina Record. 

The administration of the Woman's College Division of the Graduate 
School is vested in a Graduate Committee and an Associate Dean of 
the Graduate School. The Committee, headed by the Associate Dean, 
transacts local graduate business within the framework of regulations 
established by the Graduate Executive Council. The Associate Dean 
serves as entrance examiner and performs through his office the custo- 
mary duties. 

Additional rules, regulations, and standards peculiar to each of the 
three areas of graduate study are established and administered by the 
department concerned. These added standards appear in the sections 
of the catalogue devoted to the departments. The prospective student 
should read the appropriate section with care. 



195 



196 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Inquiries concerning curricula, specific courses, scholarships, fellow- 
ships, and information peculiar to a field of study should be sent directly 
to the department concerned. General information may be obtained from 
the office of the Associate Dean of the Graduate School. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Admission to Graduate Study: For unconditional admission to 
graduate study, the applicant must hold a bachelor's degree from a 
recognized institution. The transcript must show an appropriate under- 
graduate major and satisfactory academic standing. Students from un- 
recognized or marginal institutions may be given provisional admis- 
sion pending the removal of conditions imposed. All candidates for 
admission must take the Graduate Record Examination, or under cer- 
tain circumstances and with the consent of the Associate Dean, the 
National Teacher Examinations. Certain students who are not candi- 
dates for a degree may be admitted as specials. 

Residence and Time Limits: At least three-fourths of the work 
must be done in campus courses; not more than one-fourth may be 
taken in extension; not more than six semester hours are accepted by 
transfer. The master's curriculum must be completed, including the 
thesis, within six calendar years. 

Tool of Research: Prior to making application for admission to 
candidacy for a degree, the student must master a tool of research, 
either a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language or, under 
certain circumstances, the fundamentals of statistics. 

Admission to Candidacy: After approximately one-third of his 
course work is completed, the student may apply to the Graduate Com- 
mittee for admission to candidacy for the degree sought. Admission 
is conditioned upon: (a) the removal of all entrance conditions, (b) 
competence in the use of the appropriate tool of research, (c) quality of 
the graduate work already completed, and (d) satisfaction of special 
requirements of the department concerned. 

Curriculum: The master's curriculum is composed of nine graduate 
courses (approximately four semester hours each) six of which must 
be in the major field and three in the related minor. 

Written Examination on the Major Field: The written examina- 
tion on the field of the major is set by the student's advisory committee 
and may be scheduled at any convenient time after two-thirds of the 
course work has been completed. 



Commercial Department 197 

Oral Examination: The oral examination is conducted by a special 
committee including the student's adviser as chairman and at least two 
other representatives of the major and minor subjects. It covers the 
entire work of the student, both major and minor, with time especially 
reserved for the defense of the thesis. 

Thesis: A thesis subject endorsed by the chairman of the student's 
advisory committee must be presented to the Graduate Committee for 
approval at least one semester prior to the time the degree is expected 
to be awarded. The thesis must be related to the graduate major and 
must be written in correct English and in a scholarly form. Four copies 
must be filed at least one month prior to the date the degree is expected. 
An abstract must accompany the thesis. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Professor Joyce (Head of the Department) ; Assistant 
Professors Harrell, Ashley, DeVinny ; Instructor Weaver. 

Applicants for admission to the Commercial Department must meet 
the regular college entrance requirements. Courses in this department 
may be credited only towards the certificate given by the department. 
The courses listed below provide the thirty-one hours required for a 
certificate : 

Hours 

Typewriting I, II 6 

Shorthand I, II 12 

Accounting 3 

Business Correspondence 3 

Office Training 4 

Health 2 

Physical Education 1 

Shorthand I 

The principles of Gregg Shorthand. Books I and II of Functional 
Method. Miss Harrell, Miss Weaver. 

Shorthand II 

The development of speed and accuracy in dictation and transcrip- 
tion to meet the standards of business. Students receiving certificates 
must be able to pass with a transcription rate of twenty-five words a 
minute and ninety-nine per cent accuracy a series of shorthand tests 
dictated at the rate of ninety words a minute for a minimum of five 
minutes; to maintain for a given period a minimum transcription rate 
of twenty-two words a minutes on letters of average length and dif- 
ficulty, with sixty per cent in mailable form. Miss Harrell, Mrs. Ashley, 
Miss Weaver. 



198 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Typewriting I 

The development of sound typewriting technique with speed and 
accuracy. The use and care of the typewriter as a business tool. Mr. 
Joyce, Miss DeVinny, Miss Weaver. 

Typewriting II 

The development of composite skill in typewriting to meet the re- 
quirements of the average business office. Students must be able to pass 
with a minimum rate of sixty words a minute and not more than one 
error every two minutes and a series of five-through ten-minutes tests 
on straight copy. Emphasis is placed on the mailability and the produc- 
tion of letters, envelopes, tabulation, and rough drafts. Mr. Joyce, Miss 
DeVinny, Miss Weaver. 

Secretarial Accounting 

The principles of accounting theory and their application in keep- 
ing the books of professional and personal service enterprises. Mr. Joyce, 
Mrs. Ashley. 

Business English 

The application of standard English to the needs of business. Spell- 
ing, punctuation, vocabulary building, and the composition of different 
types of business letters are emphasized. Miss Harrell. 

Office Training 

The development of well-rounded occupational intelligence ; the opera- 
tion of the most frequently used office machines; filing. Mrs. Ashley, 
Miss Harrell, Miss DeVinny, Miss Weaver. 

Placement Service 

The department maintains contact with the leading business institu- 
tions in the state and co-operates with the College Placement Bureau 
in securing positions for its students. 

Laboratory Fee 

A typewriting laboratory fee of two dollars each semester is re- 
quired of every student in the Commercial Department. 



VIII. FACULTY, ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, AND 
OTHER PERSONNEL 

1948-49 

Abbott, Alice K., Associate Professor, Spanish. 

Adams, Charles M., Professor, Librarian. 

Adams. Maude L., Assistant Professor, Business Education. 

Adams, May Lattimore, Secretary, Office of the Dean of Women. 

Alexander, Louise B., Associate Professor, Political Science. 

Allred, Rebecca Scott, Supervisor of Switchboard. 

Altvater, H. Hugh, Professor, Music; Dean of School of Music. 

Anderton, Laura, Instructor, Biology, Counselor. 

Andrews, Caroline, Assistant, Chemistry. 

Andrews, Gozeal Hunt, Counselor. 

x Anthony, Hallie, Secretary, Public Relations Office. 

Arundel, Edna, Associate Professor, Geography. 

Ashley, Emily Gentry, Assistant Professor, Commercial Department. 

Atkins, Louise, Secretary, Department of Education. 

Atkisson, Claire Henley, Assistant Professor, Music. 

Austin, Virginia, Instructor, Economics. 

Baity, Louise Harlow, Manager, Soda Shop. 

Bardolph, Richard, Assistant Professor, History. 

Barksdale, Susan, Instructor, Art. 

Barney, Winfield S., Professor, Romance Languages. 

Barrett, Wiliam R., Assistant Professor, German. 

Barrow, Elva E., Professor, Chemistry. 

Barton, Helen, Professor, Mathematics. 

Barwick, Mary Elizabeth, Instructor, English. 

Beale, Annie Ben, Stenographer, Office of Assistant Controller. 

Beaman, Charlotte Anne, Instructor, Home Economics. 

Bell, Beverly, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Bleick, Frances A., Instructor, Physical Education. 

Bodie, Ann L., Counselor. 

Booker, Elizabeth, Secretary, Office of the Class Chairmen. 

Bowman, Wayne, Assistant Professor, English. 

Brady, Hilda, Instructor, Art. 

Bridgers, John E., Jr., Associate Professor, English. 

Browning, Alma, Assistant Professor, Education. 

Bunn, Olena Swain, Assistant, Registrar's Office. 

Burdett, Rita, Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 

Burns, Helen, Associate Professor, Freshman Class Chairman. 

Bush, May Dulaney, Assistant Professor, English. 



Retired January 1, 1949. 

199 



200 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Butler, Ethel V., Manager of Book Store. 

Carruthers, Patricia E., Counselor. 

Carter, Anne Fulton, Counselor. 

Church, Jean, Curator, Art. 

Clement, Dorothy Lee, Counselor. 

Clements, Ruth, Assistant Professor, Health. 

Cleveland, Rosemary, Instructor, Education. 

Clutts, Oliver P., Professor, Education. 

Coldwell, Inez, Associate Professor, Biology. 

Collings, Ruth M. (M.D.), Professor of Health; Physician. 

Cooke, Dennis H., Professor, Education. 

Courtney, John E., Assistant Professor, Art. 

Covington, Dorothy, Secretary, Office of the Assistant Controller. 

Cowling, Elizabeth, Assistant Professor, Music. 

Cox, Elsie Jane, Instructor, Physics. 

Cox, Evelyn M., Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 

Coxe, Agnes N., Associate Professor, Home Economics. 

Cunningham, Lillian, Counselor. 

Cutting, Helen F., Assistant Professor, Spanish. 

Dalrymple, Ruth, Assistant Professor, Health. 

Davis, Audrey L., Assistant, Psychology. 

Davis, Dorothy, Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 

Davis, M. Louise, Secretary, News Bureau. 

Dawley, Charlotte W., Assistant Professor, Biology. 

Dean, Evon Welch, Secretary, Alumnae Office. 

Denneen, Marie B., Associate Professor, Education. 

DeVeny, Doris, Accompanist, Physical Education. 

DeVeny, William C, Associate Professor, Music. 

DeVinny, Margaret C, Assistant Professor, Commercial Department. 

Dickieson, George W., Assistant Professor, Music. 

Dickinson, Anne M., Instructor, Spanish, Counselor. 

Dobbins, Sarah Clark, Office of Public Relations. 

Doran, Martha V. (M.D.), Associate Physician. 

Draper, Bernice E., Associate Professor, History. 

Duffy, Elizabeth, Professor, Psychology. 

Dunn, James Arthur, Professor, English. 

Edwards, Margaret M., Professor, Home Economics. 

Eicher, C. Franklin, Assistant Professor, Psychology. 

England, Kathryn McA., Assistant Professor, English. 

Escajeda, Josefina, Instructor, Spanish. 

Falloon, Marian, Instructor, Physical Education. 

Farinholt, Virginia C, Assistant Professor, Spanish. 

Felt, William N., Assistant Professor, French. 

2 Ferrell, Mary Lois, Associate Professor, Piano. 

Fitch, Mary H., Pay Roll Clerk, Accounting Department. 



2 Deceased December 19, 1948. 



Faculty and Administrative Staff 201 

Fitzgerald, Mary, Assistant Professor, Education. 

Fitzgerald, Ruth, Professor, Education. 

Fitzpatrick, Edward C, Jr., Instructor, English. 

Forney, Edna A., Assistant Treasurer. 

Fortner, Miriam, Secretary, Admissions Office. 

Fowler, Evelyn, Assistant Professor, Business Education. 

Friedlaender, Marc, Professor, English. 

Funderburk, Annie Beam, Assistant Professor, French. 

Gangstad, Virginia, Assistant Professor, Biology. 

Garner, Maxine, Assistant Professor, Director of Religious Activities, 

Counselor. 
Garrard, Robert L., Psychiatrist. 
Givler, John Paul, Professor, Biology. 
Glass, Irene, Counselor. 

"Gordon, Mary Lois, Secretary, Public Relations Office. 
Gould, Mildred R., Associate Professor, English. 
Greene, Margaret, Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 
Gresham, Edna Earle, Secretary, Education. 
Griffin, Ellen, Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 
Grogan, Ione H., Assistant Professor, Mathematics, Counselor. 
Gullander, Magnhilde, Professor, History. 
Gulliver, Charlotte, Postmistress. 
Gunter, Ruth, Assistant Professor, Education. 
Gyles, Mary Randolph, Secretary, Office of the Department of Physical 

Education. 
Hall, Alonzo C, Professor, English. 
Hamrick, Marietta, Assistant, Biology. 

Hardaway, Mathilde, Assistant Professor, Business Education. 
Hardin, Noma, Assistant Professor, Art. 
Hardre, Rene, Associate Professor, French. 
Harpster, Hilda T., Assistant Professor, Biology. 
Harrell, Mary, Assistant Professor, Commercial Department. 
Harris, Mildred, Associate Professor, Health. 
Harwood, Edith, Transcript Clerk, Office of the Registrar. 
Hasty, Emily R., Secretary, Department of Home Economics. 
Hathaway, Martha Elizabeth, Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 
Hawkins, Kathleen P., Secretary of Loans. 
Hege, Josephine, Assistant Professor, History. 

Hester, Carey F., Librarian in Curry School, Department of Education. 
Highsmith, James Albert, Professor, Psychology. 
Hocker, Robert G., Assistant Professor, History. 
Holder, Elizabeth J., Assistant Circulation Librarian. 
Holloway, Birdie H., Assistant Professor, Public School Music. 
Honbarrier, Margaret Sparger, Clerical Assistant, Library. 



3 Resigned Norember 1, 1948. 



202 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hood, Marjorie, Head of Circulation Department, Library. 
Hooke, Malcolm K., Professor, Romance Languages. 
Hornaday, John A., Assistant Professor, Psychology. 
Horton, Olive S., Counselor. 

Howell, Evelyn, Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 
Huffines, Katherine Chauncey, Office of Public Relations. 
Huffman, Edith, Instructor, Education. 
Hughes, Annie H., Secretary, Office of the College Physician. 
Hunt, Ligia D., Instructor, Romance Languages. 
Hunter, Ethel Haskin, Counselor. 

Hunter, Eugenia McIver, Assistant Professor, Education. 
Hunter, Mary Alford, Instructor, Education. 
Hunter, Rita, Assistant, Chemistry. 
Hurley, Leonard B., Professor, English. 
Huse, Mary Kathleen, Instructor, Psychology. 
Hussey, Minnie M., Readers' Adviser, Library. 
Ingraham, Helen, Associate Professor, Biology. 
Ivy, Gregory D., Professor, Art. 

Jackson, Virginia Elizabeth, Office of Public Relations. 
Jackson, Walter Clinton, Chancellor of the College and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the University. 
Jarrell, Mackie L., Instructor, English. 
Jarrell, Randall, Associate Professor, English. 
Jastrow, Elizabeth, Assistant Professor, Art. 
Jenkins, Josephine Tucker, Cashier, Bookstore. 
Jernigan, Charlton C, Professor, Classical Civilization. 
Jester, Betty Brown, Alumnae Secretary. 
Johns, Clarence D., Professor, History. 
Johnson, Glenn R., Professor, Sociology. 
Joyce, George M., Professor, Commercial Department. 
Kehoe, Cathryne, Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 
Keister, Albert S., Professor, Economics. 
Kim mel, Herbert, Associate Professor, Education. 
Kline, Duane P., Assistant Professor, Music. 
Kreimeier, Anna M., Assistant Professor, Education. 
Kremer, M. Josephine, Professor, Home Economics. 
Lael, Frances D., Instructor, Education. 
Largent, Vera, Associate Professor, History. 
LaRochelle, Augustine, Associate Professor, Spanish. 
Lauten, Doris Higgins, Assistant, Psychology. 
Layman, Emma McCloy, Assistant Professor, Psychology. 
Leonard, Marjorie, Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 
Lewis, Anne Louise, Assistant Professor, Mathematics. 
Lindsey, Virgil E., Assistant Professor, Economics. 
Littlejohn, Vance T., Professor, Business Education. 
Livingston, Ella Mae, Bookkeeper, Home Economics Cafeteria. 



Faculty and Administrative Staff 203 

Lockhart, John C, Professor, Assistant Controller, Business Manager. 

Love, Lila Belle, Associate Professor, Bacteriology. 

Lowe, Louise, Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 

McBane, Frances D., Instructor, Piano. 

McGeady, Mary T., Secretary, Business Education Department. 

McLeod, Alexander H., Jr., Instructor, History. 

McNutt, Franklin H., Professor, Education. 

Maphet, Princie A., Assistant to the Registrar. 

Marble, Guita, Assistant Professor, Chemistry. 

Martin, Evelyn, Counselor. 

Martus, Ethel L., Associate Professor, Physical Education. 

Mason, Jocelyn, Secretary, Education. 

Mason, Margaret, Instructor, Library. 

Mehaffie, Harriett, Assistant Professor, Education. 

Miller, Meta Helena, Professor, Romance Languages. 

Minor, Alleine R., Professor, Piano. 

Montague, Patsy, Assistant Professor, Education. 

Moomaw, Virginia G., Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 

Moore, Betty, Assistant Dietitian. 

Moore, Martha Pearl, Instructor, Physical Education. 

4 Moore, Mary Taylor, Professor, Registrar of the College. 

Moose, Vivian C, Assistant Cataloguer, Library. 

Morgan, Inga Borgstrom, Instructor, Piano. 

Morgan, Mary E., Instructor, Chemistry. 

Morgan, Phillip, Assistant Professor, Piano. 

Mossman, Mereb E., Professor, Sociology. 

Moxley, Helen, Assistant Director of Residence. 

Mumford, Sallie T., Laboratory Technician, Infirmary. 

Neal, Lois Smathers, Instructor, Assistant Reference Librarian. 

Neale, Walter C, Instructor, Economics. 

Newton, Mary Edith, Manager of Home Economics Cafeteria. 

Newton, Mildred P., Secretary of Admissions, Office of the Registrar. 

5 Nielson, Victoria Carlson, Professor, Health. 

Nolte, Ida J., Instructor, Business Education. 

O'Boyle, Lenore, Assistant Professor, History. 

Osborne, Elizabeth M., Assistant, Biology. 

Painter, James W., Professor, English. 

Painter, Kathleen S., Instructor, English. 

Park, Herbert W., Instructor, Physical Education. 

Peden, Jessie, Assistant Professor, Education. 

Penn, Ellen, Professor, Home Economics. 

Petty, Mary M., Professor, Chemistry. 

Pfaff, Eugene E., Professor, History. 



4 Deceased October 8, 1948. 
5 Retired August 31, 1948. 



204 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Phillips, Charles Wiley, Professor, Director of Public Relations. 

Phillips, Coy T., Associate Professor, Geography. 

Pickard, Helen, Office of the Assistant Controller. 

Playfoot, Viva M., Associate Professor, Home Economics. 

Potter, Jeannette R., Assistant Professor, Physical Education. 

Powell, Virginia Mae, Assistant Director of Dining Halls. 

Pritchett, Theda, Office of the Dietitian. 

Prondecki, Elvira L., Counselor. 

Rankin, Frances W., Secretary, Home Economics. 

Reardon, Anna Joyce, Associate Professor, Physics. 

Reger, Anna, Assistant Professor, Education. 

"Ritchie, Lawrence S., Assistant Professor, Biology. 

Roberts, Walter K., Instructor, Education. 

Robinson, Eloise Taylor, Bookkeeper in Book Store. 

Rogers, Hollis J., Assistant Professor, Biology. 

Rogers, Lettie Hamlett, Assistant Professor, English. 

Romefelt, Nancy M., Assistant, Chemistry. 

Rosa, Bess N., Associate Professor, Home Economics. 

Rowley, Abigail, Associate Professor, English. 

Ryan, Alice J., Instructor, Chemistry. 

Sampson, Elizabeth, Head of Catalogue Department, Library. 

Sancton, Margaret Coley, Pay Roll Clerk, Accounting Department. 

SCHAEFFER, Florence L., Professor, Chemistry. 

Schenck, Jean, Assistant Professor, Music. 

7 Schoch, Caroline B., Professor, German. 

Schuler, Anne Warren, Instructor, Physics. 

Scott, Louise, Supervisor, Switchboard. 

Sears, Wilma, Instructor, Physical Education. 

Seawell, Mary Robert, Order Librarian. 

Shafer, Ruthe, Office of the Treasurer. 

Shaftesbury, Archie D., Professor, Zoology. 

Shamburger, Anne, Assistant Professor, Health. 

Shaver, Ruth Agnes, Associate Professor, Education. 

Shelden, Gene, Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 

Sherrill, Bette Jane Michels, Secretary, School of Music. 

Shivers, Lyda Gordon, Associate Professor, Sociology. 

SiLER, Mary Lane, Assistant Dietitian. 

Singletary, Emeve P., Instructor, Nursery School. 

Sink, J. M., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Smallwood, Allene Parks, Office Assistant, Admissions Office. 

Smith, John Aaron, Associate Professor, Education. 

Smith, Sara Elizabeth, Instructor, Sociology. 

Soles, Myrtle, Instructor, Latin. 

Spivey, G. Callaway, Assistant Professor, English. 



«On leave of absence, 1948-1949. 
^Retired August 31, 1948. 



Faculty and Administrative Staff 205 

Spruill, Patty, Associate Professor, Business Education. 

Staton, Cora Jane, Nurse, Infirmary. 

Street, Madeleine B., Associate Professor, Home Economics. 

"Strong, Cornelia, Professor, Mathematics. 

9 Sullivan, Jean Morgan, Secretary, Education. 

Summerell, Jane, Professor, English. 

Surratt, Helen K., Assistant Professor, Home Economics. 

Swanson, Mabel N., Professor, Home Economics, Dietitian. 

Szabo, Frank W., Instructor, Education. 

Taylor, Katherine, Dean of Women, Associate Professor. 

Taylor, William Raymond, Professor, English. 

Tennent, Mary A., Assistant Registrar. 

Thayer, Sanchia, Instructor, English. 

Thiel, Albert F., Associate Professor, Botany. 

Thomas, Annabelle, Assistant, Biology. 

Thompson, Alma Coley, Bookkeeper, Accounting Department. 

Thompson, George M., Professor, Music. 

Thrush, Helen, Assistant Professor, Art. 

Tillett, Nettie Sue, Associate Professor, English. 

Trumper, Virginia, Serials Librarian. 

Turbiville, Mary Graves, Assistant Nurse, Infirmary. 

Turner, Louise, Secretary, Office of the Chancellor. 

Twiggs, Carolyn, Assistant, Biology. 

Vaughan, Herbert E., Jr., Associate Professor, Education. 

Wade, R. Jeanette, Assistant Manager, Book Store. 

Walker, Lila Peck, Assistant Professor, Mathematics. 

Watkins, Emily H., Associate Professor, Mathematics. 

Watson, Marion M., Assistant Professor, Education. 

Weaver, Marvelle, Instructor, Commercial Department. 

Weisgarber, Bethiah, Assistant, Catalogue Department, Library. 

Weisgarber, Elliot, Assistant Professor, Music. 

Wellman, Rowena, Assistant Professor, Business Education. 

Wharton, Jane M., Instructor, Music. 

Whatley, Mary H., Instructor, Sociology. 

Whitlock, V. Louise, Assistant Professor, Business Education. 

Wilkinson, Albert A., Director, News Bureau. 

Williams, Edna R., Nurse, Infirmary. 

Williams, Mary Katharina, Assistant Professor, Art. 

Williams, Maude, Associate Professor, Physiology. 

Williams, Sue Vernon, Head of Reference Department, Library. 

Wilson, George P., Professor, English. 

Wolfe, Eleanor, Instructor, Physical Education. 

Wooten, Esther A., Assistant, Biology. 

Zimmerman, Alice B., Assistant Professor, Psychology. 



"Retired August 31, 1948. 
"Resigned October 20, 1948. 



206 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

At the Fifty-sixth Annual Commencement of the 
College, May 31, 1948 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Iona Maxine Alexander Crumpler 

Martha Brookes Allen Asheville 

Ruth Hamilton McGehee Allen Greensboro 

Peggy Marie Almond Asheboro 

Jane Wallace Amos New Bern 

Caroline Andrews Mount Olive 

Gertrude Matilda Archer cum laude Greensboro 

Katharine Murray Arrowood Barium Springs 

Alma Ruth Arthurs Salisbury 

Mary Patsy Bailey Rocky Mount 

Grace Mae Corpening Baldwin Nebo 

Martha Elizabeth Ballard Biscoe 

Betsy Bennett Barnes magna cum laude Wilson 

Nina Ann Barnes Henderson, R. 4 

Frances Ann Barnett magna cum laude Joppa, Md., R.F.D. 

Shirley Carol Bartenfeld Dunwoody, Ga., R.F.D. 

Janet Gray Brooks Basham cum laude Greensboro 

Marjorie Frances Beam Shelby 

Florence Madelene Bearden Asheville 

Beverly Frances Bell Greensboro 

Florence Edgar Wardrup Bingham Middlesboro, Ky. 

Ethel Paula Bird Florence, S. C. 

Martha Fay Northcott Bissett Greensboro 

Mary Sue Blalock Greensboro 

Mary Alice Blue Carthage, R. 3 

Sallee Lenore Blumenstock West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Mary Ruth Bodenheimer Kernersville, R. 1 

Margaret Elizareth Bond Windsor 

Grace Minor Boring Oxford 

Myrtle Evelyn Boyd Rocky Mount 

Helen Palmer Boyette Carthage 

Margaret Joy Brandenburg Elizabeth, N. J. 

Elizabeth Evelyn Briggs Burnsville 

Alice Elizabeth Brinkley Wilson 

Betty Jane Bryant Raleigh 

Elizabeth Rowena Budlong Winston-Salem 

Alma Mae Bullard Chapel Hill 

Betsy Anne Bullock cum laude Rocky Mount 

Susan Grey Bumpass Virgilina, Va. 

Mary Carmelita Buquo Hot Springs 



Degrees Conferred 207 

Frances Ann Butler Savannah, Ga. 

Anne Shirley Carter Knoxville, Tenn. 

Jean Cathey Charlotte, R. 6 

Martha Sue Causey Liberty, R. 1 

Gladys Ione Chambers Raleigh 

Marjorie Lee Chapman Savannah, Ga. 

Kathryn Lindsay Chason Fayetteville, R. 3 

Rena Lou Cheek cum laude Chapel Hill 

Mary Evelyn Childers Kannapolis 

Mary McKeithan Clegg Carthage 

Petsa Constantine Cockinos Charlotte 

Eileen Elizabeth Cooney Trenton, N. J. 

Margaret Blanch Covington Laurinburg 

Evelyn Anne Craig Charlotte 

Margy Isabelle Crawford Greensboro 

Frances Louise Cray San Antonio, Texas 

Esther Lee Cresson cum laude Lenoir 

Helen Elneta Crocker Grover 

Jane Brady Daniel Charlotte 

Derusha Darden Murf reesboro 

Helen Alice DaVault magna cum laude Charlotte 

Audrey Louise Davis Greensboro 

Nell Forester Davis Statesville 

Sarah Jane Davis Shelby, R. 3 

Mabel Kathleen Dellinger Conover 

Marian Dillon Thomasville 

Blanche Eunice Dodds Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Helen Leah Clark Dunlap Greensboro, R. 3 

Margaret Lucille Earles Greensboro, R. 1 

Martha Sue Eckard Charlotte 

Nancy Alice Eifort West End 

Theo Beatrice Elliott Monroe 

Mary Jeannette Fair Lincolnton 

Mary Elizabeth Fant 1 2 Wrightsville Beach 

Margaret Louise Ferebee Vanceboro 

Frances Marie Ferguson Kannapolis 

Jean Rebecca Ferguson Martinsville, Va. 

Elizabeth Jean Flanagan Hendersonville 

Jean Nugent Fleming Oxford, R. 4 

Hilda Harpe Folger Winston-Salem 

IDELLE Sylvia Goodman cum laude Hock Hill, S. C. 

Ruth Shaw Gregory Halifax 

Zana Groome High Point 

Dorothy Uldine Hall Cordova 



1 Absent. 

2 Dated July 19, 1947. 



208 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Shirley Lavina Harris Thomasville 

Elizabeth Aurelia Harrison Black Mountain 

Catherine Long Coulter Hattaway Greensboro 

Addie Lee Hedgepeth Halifax, R. 2 

Margaret Lee Hedrick Winston-Salem 

Rosemary Henderson Herman magna cum laude Waynesville 

Sadie Alease Herndon Morrisville 

Blanche Hale Hicks Greensboro 

Sylvia Wade Hill Wadesboro 

Dorothy Louise Holbert Horseshoe, R. 1 

Martha Wooldridge Hollyday Asheville 

Jean Slate Holton High Point, Rt. 4 

Dorothy Lee Kennedy Honeycutt Greensboro 

Margaret Montgomery Honeycutt Marion 

Nancy Margaret Hope Charlotte 

Jean McNeil Howard Hertford 

Lola Wallace Howell Rockingham 

Mary Lois Howell Vilas 

Maryann Donnan Huddleston Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Margaret Lillian Hudson magna cum laude Greensboro 

Sally Loftin Hudson Waxhaw 

Martha Ann Hull Charlotte 

Mary Elizabeth Deas Hunt 3 Canton 

Helen Dunn Hunter Charlotte 

Mary Palmer Hunter 3 4 Wilmington 

Rita Izard Hunter Lillington 

Ann Elizabeth Hurst Wilmington 

Alice Mae Ingram magna cum laude Taylorsville 

Patsy Queen Ingram Albemarle 

Dorothy Jane Isley Greensboro 

Helen Louise Shoaf Jarvis Greensboro 

Margaret Virginia Johnson Robersonville 

Laura Ann Johnston Manteo 

Eloise Hester Jones Oxford, R. 1. 

Iris Jean Jones Ramseur 

Mary Fields Jones Fayetteville 

Vivian Juanita Jordan Aberdeen 

Bernice Gertrude Kaplin Bridgeport, Conn. 

Alice Virginia Keister cum laude Greensboro 

Janet Joanna .Kendrick Greensboro, R. 1 

Jean McNair Kirkman Greensboro 

Stella Elizabeth Kittrell Greenville 

Agnes Marie Kuehl Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 

Margaret Oliphant Donald Lamason 3 Asheville 



'Absent. 

4 Dated July 19, 1947. 



Degrees Conferred 209 

Catherine Lattimore Shelby, R. 5 

Gloria Faye Laughton Beaufort 

Doris Anne Higgins Lauten Greensboro 

Roberta Grace Donaldson Lawhon West End 

Jacquelyn Logan Letcher Edenton, R. 2 

Aditha Lloyd Washington, D. C. 

Mary Vance McAdams Elon College 

Margaret Nancy McBane Mebane, R. 1 

Virginia Victoria McCorkle Mocksville, R. 4 

Sylvia Marie McGee Winston-Salem 

Elizabeth Anne McKinney Boston, Mass. 

Geraldine Eleanor McKinney Boston, Mass. 

Lillian Bernice McMurry Lawndale, R. 3 

Helen Louise McNaull Charlotte 

Billie Eleanor McNeely Greensboro 

Catherine Barbara Pelton McNutt Greensboro 

Ruth Ollis Macy cum laude Morehead City 

Muriel Marie Magnant Rye, N. Y. 

.Katharine McRae Malloy Laurinburg 

Mary Louise Manley Asheville 

Jean Lois Massengill Goldsboro 

Sybil Jean Matthews Roseboro 

Patricia Taylor Boren May 3 New Orleans, La. 

Marjorie Whittington Memory Randleman 

Katina Charles Michaels cum laude Charlotte 

Jane Mitchell Aulander 

Carolyn Webb Moore Forest City 

Mary Doris Moore West End, R. 1. 

Jule More Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Rose Katherine Morton Albemarle 

Louise Ann Muessen cum laude Baltimore, Md. 

Nancy Jane Siff Murphey cum laude New York, N. Y. 

Ruth Eleanor Murphy Guilford College, R. 2 

Betty Lou Nance High Point 

Carlita Leona Nesslinger cum laude Staten Island, N. Y. 

Mildred Neville Chapel Hill 

Helen Lucille Norman Greensboro 

Frances Adams Norris Framingham, Mass. 

Barbara Jean O'Brien Oxford, R. 5 

Georgetta Olive Fayetteville 

Doris Elaine Kelly O'Reilly Greensboro 

Elizabeth Martin Osborne Greensboro 

Nancy Elizabeth Osteen Rockingham 

Mildred Esther Palmer Locust, N. J. 

Barbara Ellen Parrish Durham 



210 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Margaret Georgianna Pate Roseboro, E. 1 

Patty Lunelle Patterson White Plains 

Frieda Elaine Penninger magna cum laude Marion 

Margery-Jean Perry Towson, Md. 

Iris Ann Peterson Hendersonville 

Carolyn Pleasants Greensboro 

Sara Madge Poole St. Pauls 

Joyce Posson cum laude Washington, D. C. 

Rose Hannah Zimmerman Post magna cum laude Salisbury 

Janie Mernelle Pruitt Rockingham 

Dorothy Evelyn Rabey Savannah, Ga. 

Ethelyn Winona Reaben Hendersonville 

Hilda Irene Ridge Gibsonville 

Mary Virginia Rigsbee Durham 

Faye Roberts Reidsville, R. 3 

Faela Mae Robinson Asheville 

Adeline Townsend Rogers Dillon, S. C, R. 1 

Nancy Morton Romefelt Glen Rock, N. J. 

Evelyn Jean Russell Asheville 

Helen Allen Sea well magna cum laude St. Pauls 

Margaret Gillette Shamer Baltimore, Md. 

Audrey Courtney Shelley Annapolis, Md. 

Gladys Marie Blue Shelton Charlotte 

Ann Jeannette Shuffler cum laude Wilmington 

Myra Chipman Slagle Franklin 

Conand Barrie Smith Freeport, N. Y. 

Helen Millicent Smith Greensboro 

Marjorie Morrow Smith University, Va. 

Nina Ellen Smith Greensboro 

Patsy Clark Smith Wilson 

Revalene Smith Seven Springs, R. 2 

Nancy Norman Souther Greensboro 

Amanda Medford Bell Sparger Greensboro 

Geneva Emo Stafford Taylorsville 

Hazel Elizabeth Stephenson Severn 

Mary Alice Stevens Council 

Dorothea Lou Stewart Buie's Creek 

Margaret McBride Stewart Julian, R. 1 

Ellen Virginia Stirewalt High Point 

Janet Marue Summerlin Rocky Mount 

Rachel Shaw Swaim Julian, R. 1 

Mildred Alma Taylor Greensboro 

Mary Belle Teague Greensboro 

Rosalie Teichman Winston-Salem 

Mary Gaillard Tennent Asheville 

Laura Elizabeth Terrell Williamsburg, Va. 



Degrees Conferred 211 

Annabelle Thomas Burlington 

Meriel Ann Thompson Goldsboro 

Billie Carolyn Thompson Mooresville, R. 1 

Emily Frances Bundy Thompson Jamestown 

Katherine Thompson Laurinburg, R. 3 

Wilma Frances Thompson Henderson 

Betty Sue Tilley cum laude Fuquay Springs 

Shirley Elizabeth Tunstall Willow Springs, R. 1 

Margaret Lee Tyson Farmville 

Ann Marie Upchurch Spring Hope 

Louise Hart Vann 5 Raleigh 

Mary Isabella Waddington Atlanta, Ga. 

Nancy Gordon Wagoner Brown Summit 

Mary Patricia Waldrop Greenville 

Rebecca Jane Walker Burlington 

Maxine Walters Oxford 

Fannie Kate Ward La Grange 

Mary Kathryn Wardrup Middlesboro, Ky. 

Dorothy Glenn Foster Warren Hendersonville 

Josie Marie White Edenton 

Sarah Jane White Winston-Salem 

Jean Choate Whitener Newton 

Lottie Nell Williams Monroe, R. 1. 

Frances Berkeley Winston Richmond, Va. 

Susan Ann Womack . , Reidsville 

Mary Rebecca Worsley Oak City 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Dorothy Virginia McCulloch Alexander Pleasant Garden 

Juanita Davis Andrews Rocky Mount 

Betty Ruth Austin Boone 

Louise Harlow Baity Roanoke Rapids 

Emily Ruth Ballinger Guilford College 

Eula Ross Gaddy Bivens Wingate 

Martha Hazel Bolick 5 6 Lenoir, R. 5 

Mae Marjorie Brannock Mount Airy 

Sara Lois Brown Seaboard 

Lita Grey Bulla cum laude Fayetteville, R. 2 

Susan Sheppard Bynum Pinetops 

Mary Robert Carland Arden 

Edythe Virginia Cathey Skyland 

Ruth Brown Clapp Atlanta, Ga. 

Linda Sue Cloer cum laude Washington, D. C. 



5 Absent. 

6 Dated July 19, 1947. 



212 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Geraldine Johnson Cobb Dunn 

Marjorie Elaine Coble Burlington, R. 4 

Betsy Ann Cole Raeford 

Virginia Annette Congleton Stokes 

Ann Mitchell Copley Raleigh 

Marjorie Love Nowell Cox Greensboro 

Edna Marie Crawford Cooleemee 

Nina Elise DeLozier Asheville 

Bobbie Jeanne Duncan Gastonia 

Agnes Almeta Edwards Whitakers, R. 1 

Peggy Jean Fincher Matthews, R. 2 

Mildred Luetta Fisher Asheville 

Lillian Gilbert Rutherf ordton, R. 2 

Doris Claudine Grinnells Raleigh 

Mildred Lou Causey Hall Liberty, R. 1 

Mildred Allene Hancock Asheville 

Isabel Cox Howard Salemburg 

Mildred Elizabeth Huggins Shannon 

Ruby Lewis Hyder Rutherfordton, Star Rt. 

Madge Griffin Chaney Jarvis Monroe 

Nancy Carolyn Jeffrey Hickory 

Barbara Neal Keeter Morganton 

Martha Ann Kluttz cum laude High Point 

Fannie Lou Lewis West End 

Betsy Adeline Lippard Albemarle, R. 3 

Mary Virginia Little La Grange 

Rebecca Lyerly Salisbury 

Mary Isabel McDonald Carthage 

Mary Alice McGilvary Jonesboro, R. 3 

Elizabeth Hardin McNairy Laurinburg 

Josephine Crocker Maddrey Weldon 

Frances Sue Martin Hickory, R. 3 

Myrle Mason Newport 

Dorotha Lou Miller Newton 

Betty Rush Mitchell Denton 

Lois Jeanne Newman Freehold, N. J. 

Elaine Noble Deep Run 

Lillian Riddick Parker Gates 

Doris Jean Patterson Freehold, N. J. 

Ina Claire Jones Pressly Charlotte 

Nancy Viola Ridenhour Cooleemee 

Harriett Faison Riley Goldsboro 

Ada Doris Robbins Battleboro 

MmiAM Tate Scott Mebane, R. 1 

Betty Lou Sharpe Raleigh 

Mary Jane Siler Asheville 



Degrees Conferred 213 

Mary Catherine Simmons Fayetteville 

Jacksie Virginia Sims Waxhaw 

Dorothy Elizabeth Smith Huntersville 

Thelma Marie Coston Smith Havelock 

Sara Louise Smith Concord 

Nancy JoAnn Snyder Charlotte, R. 8 

Frances Catherine Stafford Liberty, R. 1 

Josephine Starling 7 8 Cascade, Va. 

Millicent Annette Teague Newland 

Frances Emmalene Thomas Gastonia 

Marietta Thompson High Point 

Marie Battle Turner Wilson 

Charlesanna Walker Greensboro, R. 2 

Dorothy Gay White Raleigh 

Ruth Virginia Whitfield Garland, R. 1 

Norma Elizabeth Whitley Winston-Salem 

Catherine Laura Wilhide Andrews 

Opal June Chester Williams Pittsboro 

Margaret Thames Wilson Dunn 

Betty Lou Wright 7 9 Douglasville, Ga. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Margaret Eleanor Clark Long Island, N. Y. 

Beatrice Elenore Schenk Crater cum laude Plainfield, N. J. 

Theresa Agnes D'Arcy New York, N. Y. 

Margaret Lovenia Goodrum Cornelius 

Lillie Mary Henson Tryon, R. 1 

Margaret Stewart Ike cum laude Tyrone, Pa. 

Agnes Ella Knull Flushing, N. Y. 

Jane Evelyn LaGier Norfolk, Conn. 

Martha Louise Miller Grafton, W. Va., R. 3 

Lois Catherine McCanless Ray Greensboro 

Elizabeth Katherine Rogers 7 Sevierville, Tenn. 

Katherine Melvin Rogers Greensboro 

Ann Gwendoily Winstead 7 Belhaven 

Elsie Chin Yuen Washington, D. C. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Katherine Collins Bennett Chapel Hill 

Janice Miriam Bosworth Long Meadow, Mass. 

Frances Arnold Bowden Milledgeville, Ga. 

Bessie Valeria Brothers Goldsboro 



'Absent. 

•Dated July 19, 1947. 

•Dated August 29, 1947. 



214 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Dorothy Casey Dudley 

Peggy Louise Clemmer Sanford 

Frances Page Coleman summa cum laude Gloucester, Va. 

Nancy Nelson Eutsler Whiteville 

Miriam Hancock Greensboro, R. 2 

Nell Lanette Holliday Jamesville 

Marjorie Joyce Hollister Springfield, Mass. 

Rosanna Jones Bailey 

Josephine Nixon Lasater Erwin, R. 1 

Patsy Ruth Miller Fayetteville 

Eva Ruth Parrish Durham 

Jeanne Newman Pope Mt. Olive 

Gladys Elizabeth Rowland Kittrell, R. 1 

Wilma La Verne Sears Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Ellis Shuler Rocky Mount 

Frances ; Kissell Suggs Gastonia 

Helen Louise Thigpen Scotland Neck 

Edna Earle Thomas Morrisville, R. 1 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Rachel Stowe Armstrong Gastonia 

Lottie Jean Barnette Charlotte, R. 6 

Doris Ward Batchelor Nashville 

Elizabeth Jane Benson Wilmington 

Marjorie Grey Boseman Rocky Mount, R. 3 

Margaret Plonk Bradley Bessemer City 

Jane Caroline Bristol Statesville 

Bettie Byers Statesville 

Barbara Ruth Clegg Greensboro 

Virginia Elizabeth Coley Newton 

Hellen Irene Costas Carolina Beach 

Roma Lee Cross Gates 

Helen Douglas Charlotte 

Ema Warren Edwards Burlington 

Caroline Flack Forest City 

Dorothy Vance Flowe Asheville 

Sue Franconia Gaines Tarboro 

Marjorie Lucille Gant Winston-Salem, R. 1 

Lois Jane Gay Rocky Mount 

Harriett Louise Gibson High Point 

Mary Angelyn Giles cum laude Cottage Grove, Tenn., R. 1 

Jean Little Griffith Albemarle 

Hilda Louise Cranford Hamrick Candor 

Leola Christine Hendricks Mocksville 

Mary Ellen Henneberger Troy 



Degrees Conferred 215 

Ella Marie Hodgin Guilford College 

Margaret Wade Hoskins Summerfield 

Mary Kathryn Ivey Burlington 

Ann Hoover Johnson Burgaw 

Verna Lee Washington, R. 1 

Margie Belle Lewis Greensboro, R. 1 

Sarah Alice McAdams Wilmington 

Ada Sue McBane Greensboro 

Mary Black McBryde Raef ord, R. 1 

Lillian Claire Maxwell Oxford 

Martha Anne Meador Williamston 

Meade Wootton Moore Wendell 

Betsy Lois Harris Morin Morganton 

Susanne Williams Park Raleigh 

Allene Moffitt Parks Kannapolis 

Louise Norman Payne Leaksville 

Ola Jean Peters Chapel Hill, R. 1 

Helen Eunice Queen Lawndale, R. 1 

Valema Grace Quinn Beulaville 

Eleanor Fritzie Raymond High Point 

Mary Leslie Rorertson 10 Jonesboro 

Nora Elizabeth Sanders Forest City 

Ruth Lee Self Spartanburg, S. C, R. 3 

Dorothy Virginia Sisk Bessemer City- 
Lois Adalaide Smith Statesville, R. 1 

Elaine Solomon Winston-Salem 

Margaret Brent Sparger Dobson 

Juanita Phillips Stone Asheboro 

Anna Mae Swain Norfolk, Va., R. 2 

Julia Rebecca Talley Troutman 

Daphne Bryan Thigpen Rocky Mount 

Elizabeth Angeline Thompson Greensboro 

Ruby Annette Tilson Durham 

Mary Elizabeth Tuttle Walnut Cove 

Jewell Adad* Vann Mt. Olive 

Barbara Jane White Guilford College 

Wilma Frances Wilfong Hickory 

Mary Ruth Wilson Guilford College 

Betty Jeanne Wolfe cum laude Albemarle 

Marian Allison Young Raleigh 



"Dated July 19, 1947. 
11 Absent. 



216 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

Frances Donnell Ashcraft cum laude Wadesboro 

Janet Elizabeth Breeding Stevensville, Md. 

Emogene Choate Sparta 

Susan Phillips Deyton Spruce Pine 

Constance Lee Edwards Trenton 

Frances Marie Fox Guilford College 

Leila Ann Graham Winston-Salem 

Mary Byrd Johnson Lillington, R. 1 

Clara Jane Key Lynchburg, Va. 

Katherine Ruth King New Bern 

Elvra Wilson Massengill Dunn 

Nona Jule Pate Goldsboro 

Nancy Pease cum laude Springfield, Mass. 

Hilda Christine Lester Purgason Greensboro 

Mary Elizabeth Rabey Savannah, Ga. 

Annabelle Lee Snoddy Salemburg 

Alberta Swain Williamston 

Ruth Carter Tilson Mars Hill 

Joyce Morton West Wilmington 

BACHELORS OF FINE ARTS 

Mary Savas Creety Atlanta, Ga. 

Martyvonne Dehoney Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Margaret Frances Hyman Dalton 

Louise Martin Waynesville 

Peggy Sue Weir Lancaster, S. C. 

MASTERS OF ARTS IN EDUCATION 

Margaret Tyson Jones 11 Asheboro 

Grady Edward Love Summerfield 

James Raymond Robbins Guilford 

Camille Brinkley Schiffman 11 Greensboro 

Pearl Gordon Shamburger Star 

MASTERS OF SCIENCE 

Marveign Cloud Cockfield Greensboro 

Margaret Sprunt Hall 11 Wilmington 

Sister Mary Raymond Powell 11 Belmont 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Lois Elizabeth Frazdsr Spray 

Cordelia French Walke Greensboro 



Degrees Conferred 



217 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Edith Webber Matthews Bennettsville, S. C. 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Mary Lura Sherrill, Doctor of Science 
Ellen Winston, Doctor of Humanities 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Linda Sue Cloer Honors in Home Economics 

Frances Page Coleman Honors in Physical Education 

Rosemary Henderson Herman Honors in Spanish 

Frieda Elaine Penninger Honors in English 

Joyce Posson Honors in English 

Betty Sue Tilley Honors in French 

PHI BETA KAPPA 
Elections from Class of 1948 



Gertrude Matilda Archer 
Betsy Bennett Barnes 
Frances Ann Barnett 
Janet Gray Brooks Basham 
Betsy Ann Bulluck 
Rena Lou Cheek 
Esther Lee Cresson 
Helen Alice DaVault 
Idelle Sylvia Goodman 
Rosemary Henderson Herman 
Margaret Lillian Hudson 
Alice Mae Ingram 



Alice Virginia Keister 
Ruth Ollis Macy 
Katina Charles Michaels 
Louise Ann Muessen 
Nancy Jane Siff Murphey 
Carlita Leona Nesslinger 
Freida Elaine Penninger 
Joyce Posson 

Rose Hannah Zimmerman Post 
Helen Allen Sea well 
Ann Jeannette Shuffler 
Betty Sue Tilley 



218 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY, 1948-1949 

Senior Class 435 

Junior Class 290 

Sophomore Class 521 

Freshman Class 696 

Commercial Students 128 

Graduate Students 12 

Special Students 82 



Total Regular Sessions 2164 

Summer Sessions, 1948 1131 

Total Number Enrolled 3295 

Number Counted Twice 228 

3067 

Curry School Enrollment 363 

Curry School, SS 1948 78 

Kindergarten and Nursery School 37 478 

Total Enrollment, 1948-1949 3545 



STUDENT LIST 

1948-1949 

SENIOR CLASS 

Adams, Nina Jean, B.A Statesville, Rt. 4 

Alexander, Ruth, B.A Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Allen, Eve-Anne, B.S.M Pollocksville 

Allen, Mary Tanner, B.S.H.E Wadesboro 

Anderson, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Arlington, Va. 

Apostolacus, Barbara, B.A Long Branch, N. J. 

Apperson, Anne, B.A Mocksville 

Austin, Patricia, B.A Brevard 

Bagwell, Esther, B.S.M Durham 

Bangert, Theresa, B.S.N Livingston, N. J. 

Banks, Doris, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Banner, Jane, B.A Greensboro 

Barbour, Antoinette, B.S.S.A Goldsboro 

Barnes, Edna, B.A Lucama, Rt. 2 

Barnhardt, Mary, B.A Charlotte 

Barringer, Amerylis, B.A Durham 

Barwick, Frances, B.S.M Greensboro 

Batchker, Arlene, B.A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bates, Natalie, B.A Alexandria, Va. 

Beaman, Margaret, B.A Greensboro 

Beasley, Mary, B.A Vass, Rt. 2 

Beck, Frances, B.S.N Greensboro 

Becker, Margaret, B.S.S.A Morganville, N. J. 

Beeson, Jewell, B.S.H.E Sophia, Rt. 1 

Bender, Gertrude, B.A Norlina, Rt. 2 

Blackburn, Audrey, B.A Baltimore, Md. 

Bobbitt, Annaionette, B.A Castalia 

Boney, Lynette, B.A Clinton 

Boren, Clarence, B.A Greensboro 

Bowen, Wanda, B.A Robbins 

Boyd, Nancy, B.A Greensboro 

Bradford, Betty, B.S.S.A Davidson 

Braswell, Kathleen, B.A Greensboro 

Bray, Rena, B.A Thomasville 

Bremer, Elizabeth, B.A Wilmington 

Bridger, Louise, B.S.S.A Bladenboro 

Brinkley, Doris, B.A Charlotte 

Brinson, Cathleen, B.A Arapahoe 

Brooks, Mary Jane, B.A Greensboro 

219 



220 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Broughton, Gervis, B.S.H.E Spencer 

Brown, Barbara Edythe, B.A Raleigh 

Brown, Betty, B.A Statesville 

Brown, Gladys Mae, B.S.H.E Clyde 

Brown, Sara Lou, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Bryant, Ruth, B.S.S.A Stedman 

Buie, Jewel, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Bull, Miriam, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Burke, Elsie Gray, B.A Winston- Salem 

Butler, Gatsey, B.S.M Goldsboro 

Caison, Betty Gene, B.S.S.A Clinton 

Campbell, Ann, B.A Taylorsville 

Campbell, Nancy Hill, B.A Pinehurst 

Cannady, Cleo, B.A Greensboro 

Carr, Betty Jane, B.S.M Burlington 

Carter, Evelyn, B.A Morganton 

Carter, Mary Ruth, B.A Greenville 

Cavin, Margaret, B.A Stanley 

Chapman, Barbara Cutright, B.S.M Snow Hill, Md. 

Cheney, Dorothy, B.A Pinehurst 

Chitty, Parthenia, B.A Murfreesboro 

Clapp, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Spencer 

Clayton, Joyce, B.S.M Asheville 

Clegg, Mary Anne, B.A High Point, Rt. 1 

Cloninger, Amelia, B.A Greensboro 

Coalson, Bessie, B.S.H.E Shelby 

Coates, Martha, B.A Saluda 

Coble, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Burlington, Rt. 4 

Coggins, Jean, B.A Lexington 

Cohn, Marilyn, B.A Alexandria, Va. 

Collarte, Lucia, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Collett, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Thomasville, Rt. 3 

Collier, Margaret, B.A Deep Run 

Cooke, Clara Jean, B.A Winston-Salem 

Cornwell, Frances, B.S.M Shelby, Rt. 5 

Covington, Mary, B.A Danville, Va. 

Cox, Claudine, B.A Asheboro 

Crohn, Miriam, B.A Asheville 

Crow, Marjorie, B. A Wilmington 

Crumpler, Anne, B.A Clinton 

Crutchfield, Lora, B.S.H.E Guilford College, Rt. 1 

Culbreth, Helen, B.A Greensboro 

Culbreth, Joy, B.S.S.A Stedmon, Rt. 1 

Culpepper, Carolyn, B.A Elizabeth City 

Cunningham, Elizabeth, B.A Gastonia 

Curlee, Geraldine, B.A Oakboro 

Curry, Carmen, B.A Alamance 



Student List 221 

Davis, Barbara Anne, B.S.M Yadkinville, Rt. 2 

Davis, Betty Lou, B.A Winston- Salem 

Davis, Jane Dyer, B.A Reidsville 

Davis, Louise, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Dawson, Susan, B.A Rocky Mount 

DeLozier, Charlotte, B.S.H.E Asheville 

Denny, Sarah, B.A. Raleigh 

DeVane, Mary Frances, B.A Fayetteville 

DeWitt, Evelyn, B.A. Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Dibben, Jane, B.A Shelby 

Dickerson, Gay, B.S.P.E Guilford College 

Dickerson, Jane, B.A Roxboro 

Dillard, Eleanor, B.S.H.E Willard 

Dineen, Mildred, B.A Springfield, Mass. 

Dobson, Mary Helen, B.A Nebo, Rt. 2 

Donald, Margaret, B.A Greensboro 

Dumas, Margaret, B.A Goldsboro 

Duncan, Glenna, B.S.H.E Siler City, Rt. 3 

Dunn, Betty, B.A Ramsey, N. J. 

Duval, Barbara, B.S.S.A Waxhaw 

Easter, Frances, B.S.S.A Spencer 

Edinger, Barbara, B.A Jersey City, N. J. 

Egerton, Martha, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Eichhorn, Louise, B.S.M Greensboro 

Ellen, Agnes, B.S.H.E Enfield, Rt. 1 

Ellinger, Frances, B.S.S.A Chapel Hill 

Entermille, Viola, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Eure, Blanche, B.A Eure 

Evans, Jean, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Fagg, Doris, B.S.S.A Mt. Olive 

Faison, Margaret, B.A Clinton 

Fardette, Patty Ann, B.S.P.E Newport News, Va. 

Farrell, Myrtle, B.A Pittsboro 

Faulkner, Betty, B.A Polkton, Rt. 1 

Ferguson, R. Frances, B.A Raleigh 

Fields, Virginia, B.A Raleigh 

Flowe, Betty, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Foil, Christine, B.S.H.E Kannapolis 

Forbes, Ann, B.A Newport News, Va. 

Ford, Mildred, B.A Seaboard 

Ford, Nancy, B.SJLE Washington 

Forney, Mary, B.A Westport, Conn., Rt. 2 

Fort, Sarah Elizabeth, B.S.N Greensboro 

Foushee, Aileen Blackwelder, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Fowler, Martha, B.S.S.A Durham 

Fox, Alluwee, B.S.H.E Siler City, Rt. 2 



222 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Fox, Elene, B.S.S.A Hickory, Rt. 3 

Francis, Helen, B.A King 

Franck, Alice, B.A Fayetteville 

Fulcher, Jean, B.A Davidson 

Fullerton, Wilma, B.A Short Hills, N. J. 

Funderburk, Nancy Beam, B.A Greensboro 

Furnas, Jean Barry, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Gabai, Julia, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Garrett, Evonne Sanders, B.A Bristol, Va. 

Garris, Martha, B.A Lilesville 

Gates, Kathryn, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Gaw, Anne, B.A Annapolis, Md. 

Genden, Anna, B.A Troy 

Gentry, Betty Jo., B.A Glade Valley 

Gill, Ruth, B.A Raleigh 

Glass, Irene, B.A Greensboro 

Glenn, Frances, B.A Raleigh 

Glenn, Jane, B.S.S.A Winston- Salem 

Goode, Gabrielle, B.A Connellys Springs 

Goodman, Peggy, B.A Memphis, Tenn. 

Goodrich, Marion, B.A Sanford 

Goodwin, Sally, B.A Falls Church, Va. 

Gordon, Patsy, B.A Lexington 

Graham, Jean, B.A Dunn, Rt. 4 

Graham, Marie, B.A Greensboro 

Gravatt, Virginia, B.A Charlotte 

Graybeal, Elizabeth, B.A West Jefferson 

Gregory, Colleen, B.A Mt. Airy, Rt. 1 

Griffin, Josephine, B.S.S.A Bailey 

Griffin, Mary W., B.A Edenton 

Grimes, Anne, B.S.H.E Rich Square 

Guion, Martha, B.A Aberdeen 

Gulledge, Caroline, B.S.H.E Wadesboro 

Gunnerson, Thelma, B.A Wilmington 

Hahn, Dorothy, B.A Concord 

Haines, Patricia, B.S.M Durham 

Haithcock, Mary, B.A Greensboro 

Hall, Doris, B.S.P.E Hamden, Conn. 

Hall, Ethel Marie, B.A Yadkinville 

Hamrick, Mary Frances, B.S.S.A Burnsville 

Hand, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Gatesville 

Hand, Marian, B.A Greenville, S. C. 

Handley, Marilyn, B.S.S.A Goldsboro 

Hanks, Jeannette, B.A Greensboro 

Harmon, Anna, B.A Kannapolis 

Harrell, Jewell, B.S.P.E Ahoskie 



Student List 223 

Harrison, Jeanette, B.A Franklin 

Harrison, Minna, B.S.S.A Lenoir 

Hart, Lee, B.S.H.E Reidsville 

Hart, Margaret, B.A Grifton 

Hartgrove, Rachel, B.S.H.E King 

Hatsell, Candace, B.A Stonewall 

Hawes, Elizabeth, B.A Morganton 

Hawthorne, Mary, B.A Steubenville, Ohio 

Hayes, Sue, B.A Granite Falls 

Hayes, Thelma, B.A Zellwood, Fla. 

Heymann, Ruth Ann, B.F.A Asheville 

Holmes, Emma, B.A Sanford 

Holt, Jane, B.S.S.A Oak Ridge 

Holtzendorff, June, B.S.P.E Clemson, S. C. 

Hooper, Anne, B.S.S.A Asheboro 

Hope, Vail, B.S.P.E Burlington 

Hough, Betty, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Howard, Lillie Frances, B.S.H.E Roseboro, Rt. 2 

Howell, Sara, B.A Winston- Salem 

Hubbard, Nancy, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Hudson, Gernell, B.A Morganton 

Huneycutt, Virginia, B.A Raleigh 

Hunter, Lois, B.S.H.E Pilot Mountain 

Hussey, Frances, B.A Greensboro 

Ingram, Catherine, B.S.H.E. Taylorsville 

Irvin, Sally, B.A Charlotte 

Jackson, Frances, B.S.S.A Robbins 

Jacobs, Helene, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

James, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Jenkins, Helen, B.S.H.E Midland, Rt. 1 

Johns, Lucy Page, B.S.M Amelia, Va. 

Johnson, Nancy, B.A Richmond, Va. 

Johnston, Celeste, B.A Pittsboro 

Jolly, Catharine, B.A Greenville 

Jonas, Martha, B.S.S.A Lincolnton 

Jones, Doris, B.A Badin 

Jones, Janet, B.A Winston- Salem 

Keeter, Bobbie Lee, B.S.S.A Bryson City 

Keeter, Eleanor, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Kelly, Alene, B.A , Hamlet, Rt. 1 

Kendall, Nancy, B.F.A Middleboro, Mass. 

Kennedy, Madge, B.S.P.E Albemarle 

Kenney, Frances, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Kesler, Ethel, B.S.P.E Winston-Salem 

Kiger, Sylvia, B.S.N Winston-Salem 



224 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Kirkman, Jean Johnston, B.A Greensboro 

Kirkpatrick, Ruth, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Rt. 4 

Knight, Mary Ellen, B.A Greensboro 

Knox, Peggy, B.S.H.E Huntersville, Rt. 2 

Koeplin, Mary Lou, B.A Greensboro 

Koster, Roberta, B.A Morganton 

Kraus, Norma, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Landon, Sidney, B.A Morganton 

Larimore, Betsy, B.F.A Walkertown 

Lee, Gladys, B.S.P.E Roanoke Rapids 

Lennon, Adelaide, B.A Whiteville, Rt. 2 

Lennon, Iva Marie, B.A Clarkton 

Leonard, Sue, B.A Lexington 

Linson, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Winston- Salem 

Liverman, Hilda, B.S.P.E Woodland 

Lockwood, Sarah, B.A Durham 

Lomax, Deane, B.A Charlotte 

Long, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Franklin 

Loomis, Kathleen, B.A Elizabethtown 

Lowrance, Betty Gabriel, B.S.H.E Mooresville 

Luther, Martha, B.A Winston-Salem 

Luther, Patricia, B.A Prosperity, S. C. 

Lynch, Frances, B.S.P.E Buie's Creek 

Lyon, Ellen Tucker, B.S.S.A Elon College 

McArn, Madelyn, B.A Rowland 

McBrayer, Ruth, B.S.S.A Lattimore 

McCallum, Lucille, B.A Troy 

McCollum, Marilyn, B.A Reidsville 

McCormick, Rachel, B.A Fayetteville, Rt. 2 

McCown, Elsie, B.A Greensboro 

McDonald, Freda, B.S.P.E Pelham, Ga. 

McDougald, Laura, B.S.H.E Raeford, Rt. 2 

McFalls, Janice, B.A Greensboro 

Mclver, Anne, B.A Winston-Salem 

McKee, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Mooresville 

McKoy, Elisabeth, B.A Wilmington 

McLean, Neva, B.S.S.A Rockingham 

McLeod, Willis Ann, B.A Robbins 

McMahon, Patricia, B.A Manhasset, N. Y. 

McNeill, Patsy, B.S.H.E Wade, Rt. 1 

Marsh, Frances, B.A Charlotte 

Marston, Nellie, B.A Durham 

Mason, Louise, B.A Newport, R.F.D. 

Meador, Robinette, B.S.H.E Reidsville, Rt. 1 

Medlin, Janis, B.S.H.E Marshville 

Miller, Georgia, B.A Spencer 



Student List 225 

Mills, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Richlands 

Moffitt, Margaret, B.A Fayetteville 

Moon, Eloise, B.S.P.E Bear Creek 

Moore, Barbara, B.A Tarboro 

Moore, Johnsie, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City 

Moore, Louise, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Moore, Margaret A., B.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Moore, Mary Helen, B.A Wendell 

Moore, Muriel, B.A Mocksville 

Morgan, Ellen, B.S.S.A Laurel Hill 

Morgan, Jean, B.A Greensboro 

Morgan, Lois Glass, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Morris, Sarah, B.A Winston- Salem 

Myers, Rae Evans, B.A Greensboro 

Newell, Nancy, B.S.M Roxboro 

Nicholas, Virginia, B.A Harrisburg, Pa. 

Niven, Marianne, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Oakes, Ann, B.S.N Maplewood, N. J. 

O'Briant, Eloise, B.A Roxboro 

O'Briant, Faye, B.A Laurinburg, Rt. 1 

Orr, Celeste, B.A Rock Hill, S. C. 

Page, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Park, Ruth, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Parker, Ann, B.F.A Raleigh 

Parker, Joyce Tyer, B.A Raleigh 

Paton, Jane, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Patrick, Mary, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Paylor, Jean, B.A Longhurst 

Peal, Jean, B.A Chadbourn 

Pearsall, Mary Etta, B.A Rocky Mount 

Penland, Doris, B.A Burnsville 

Peppel, Gertrude, B.A Belleville, N. J. 

Perry, Jane, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Phillips, Elizabeth, B.A Thomasville 

Pickard, Nancy, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Pickells, Ann, B.A Plandome, N. Y. 

Pierson, Patricia, B.A Elliott City, Md. 

Poplin, Betty Ray, B.S.H.E Indian Trail, Rt. 1 

Poplin, Cora Lee, B.S.M Winston-Salem 

Powell, Helen Marie, B.A Ruffin, Rt. 1 

Preisinger, Marilyn, B.S.S.A Badin 

Price, Alice, B.A Charlotte 

Price, Blair, B.A Mooresville 

Proffitt, Jean, B.A Asheville 

Pyatt, Jean, B.S.P.E Goldsboro 



226 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Quinerly, Walenah, B.A Grifton 

Rabil, Virginia, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Raif ord, Anne, B.A Erwin 

Rainey, Frances, B.A Chicago, 111. 

Rainey, Jean, B.S.M Winston- Salem 

Ramsey, Frances, B.A Belmont 

Raper, Betsey, B.A Mt. Olive 

Rawls, Ruth, B.A Winston-Salem 

Raywid, Mary Anne, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Reed, Jane, B.A Winston-Salem 

Reeves, Mary Carolyn, B.A Sanford 

Regener, Martha, B.A Evansville, Ind. 

Reilley, Miriam, B.A Charlotte 

Ricks, Elizabeth, B.A Greenville 

Rigsbee, Jacqueline, B.A Durham 

Robert, Lorraine, B.A Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Robinson, Mary Anne, B.A York, S. C. 

Rodgers, Winifred, B.A Scotland Neck 

Rose, Estelle, B.S.S.A Durham 

Ross, Betty, B.A Fallston 

Routh, Jacqueline, B.A Greensboro 

Royal, Jean, B.A Thomasville 

Sampson, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Morehead City 

Sanderson, Betty, B.S.H.E Rocky Point 

Schoenemann, Inge, B.A Elkins Park, Pa. 

Scholtes, Margaret, B.A Winston-Salem 

Schultz, Frances, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Scott, Elaine, B.A Winston-Salem 

Scott, Elizabeth, B.A Burlington 

Scribner, Virginia, B.A Guilford, Conn. 

Seabolt, Helen, B.A Greensboro 

Sellers, Ruth, B.A Charlotte 

Sessoms, Hazel, B.A Coleraine 

Shannon, Anelia, B.S.S.A Waxhaw 

Sharpe, Bernice, B.A Harmony 

Shepherd, Lula, B.A Laurinburg 

Shepherd, Nancy, B.A Charlotte 

Sherwin, Hilda, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Shore, Jan, B.A Winston-Salem 

Shore, Susan, B.S.H.E Yadkinville, Rt. 1 

Shull, Patty, B.A Winston-Salem 

Sides, Carolyn, B.A Charlotte 

Siler, A. Elizabeth, B.A Waynesville 

Simmons, Rachel, B.A Lake Lure 

Sinclair, Frances, B.S.P.E West End 

Slagle, Kate, B.S.H.E Toecane 



Student List 227 

Sloan, Elizabeth, B.A Garland 

Smith, Imogene, B.S.S.A Linwood, Rt. 1 

Smith, Lois Ruth, B.A Eastport, Md. 

Smith, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Lenoir 

Smith, Phyllis, B.A Raleigh 

Spangler, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Shelby, Rt. 1 

Spearman, Catherine, B.A Greenville 

Speas, Julia, B.S.H.E East Bend 

Spencer, Juanita, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Spencer, Margaret, B.A Rocky Mount 

Stanfield, Jean, B.A Brown Summit 

Starnes, Martha, B.S.S.A Forest City 

Stephens, Leila, B.A Harrisburg 

Stewart, Cathren, B.A Statesville, Rt. 6 

Stiller, Corinne, B.A Salisbury, Rt. 2 

Stratton, Jane, B.S.S.A Hickory 

Strelitz, Barbara, B.A Lexington 

Swaringen, Greta, B.A Traphill 

Swicegood, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Linwood, Rt. 1 

Sydnor, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Beckley, W. Va. 

Taylor, Janie Moye, B.A Williamston, Rt. 3 

Taylor, Maud, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Taylor, Sarah, B.S.H.E Durham 

Teague, Nina, B.S.S.A. Staley 

Thacker, Gene, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Thomas, Doris Jean, B.S.M Durham 

Thomas, Lois, B.A. Leaksville 

Thomas, Mary Jane, B.S.M Winston- Salem 

Thrower, Jean, B.S.S.A Laurinburg 

Tinsley, Lucy, B.S.H.E Lake Toxaway 

Tolleson, Betsy, B.A Kings Mountain 

Townsend, Elizabeth, B.A Greensboro 

Townsend, Jean, B.A Clarkton 

Trollinger, Mary, B.S.S.A Laurinburg 

Tucker, Doris, B.A Albemarle 

Umstead, Betsy, B.S.P.E Durham 

Underwood, Betty, B.A Charlotte, Rt. 6 

Upchurch, Catherine, B.S.P.E Buie's Creek 

Van Poole, Eleanor, B.A Salisbury 

Vannoy, Evelyn, B.S.H.E West Jefferson 

Waldenmaier, Elizabeth, B.A Wilmington 

Wall, Helen Anne, B.F.A Lilesville 

Waller, Lovelace, B.S.H.E Kinston, Rt. 3 

Walters, Joycelyn, B.F.A Gibsonville 

Ward, Jacquelyn, B.S.P.E Thomasville 



228 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Watson, Joan, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Way, Marguerite, B.S.H.E Waynesville 

Weathers, Bette Cox, B.A Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Weir, Virginia, B.A Winston- Salem 

Wells, Martha, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Westmoreland, Barbara, B.A Thomasville 

Westmoreland, Martha, B.A Tabor City 

Wheeler, Jean, B.S.M Gastonia 

White, C. Anne, B.A Lenoir 

White, Marjorie, B.A Belvidere, Rt. 1 

White, Mary Ann, B.A Guilford College 

Whitley, Elmira, B.A Raeford 

Wilkinson, Carolyn, B.A Nelson, Va., Rt. 1 

Willard, Charlotte, B.A Ft. Motte, S. C. 

Williams, Birshal, B.S.H.E Audryville 

Williams, Elizabeth, B.A Shelby 

Williams, Esther Y., B.A Greensboro 

Williams, Grace, B.S.H.E Yadkinville 

Williamson, Margaret, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Williamson, Mildred, B.A Wadesboro 

Wilson, Mabel, B.S.M Angier 

Winecoff, Elizabeth, B.A Greensboro 

Wingfield, Sallie, B.A Charlottesville, Va., R. 2 

Wise, Phyllis, B. S. S. A Stumpy Point 

Wood, Carolyn, B.A Dillon, S. C. 

Wood, Virginia, B.A Elizabeth City 

Woodard, Reba, B.A Laurel Hill 

Worthington, Mary, B.S.S.A Grifton 

Wyche, Jane, B.A '. Waynesville 

York, Georgia, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Rt. 4 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Albert, Ina J., B.A White Plains, N. Y. 

Allen, Caroline, B.A Reidsville 

Anderson, Mary Henry, B.S.S.A Cheraw, S. C, Rt. 2 

Angier, Zalene, B.S.P.E Durham 

Atkins, Emily, B.A Winston-Salem 

Auerbach, Edna, B.A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Austin, Ramona, B.S.H.E Hatteras 

Bachman, Janet, B.S.H.E Henderson 

Baldwin, Mary, B.S.H.E Sanford 

Barlowe, Margaret, B.S.H.E Lenoir, Rt. 1 

Barringer, Sarah, B.S.N Rockwell 

Baughman, Virginia, B.A Charlotte 

Beatty, Laura, B.A Elizabethtown 



Student List 229 

Bedell, Mayebelle, B.S.P.E Woodbine, Ga. 

Beleos, Katina, B.S.S.A Camden, S. C. 

Benson, Mary, B.S.P.E Wilmington 

Bertholf, Virginia, B.S.P.E Morris Plains, N. J. 

Best, Robbie, B.A Kinston 

Birchett, Louise, B.S.M Hopewell, Va. 

Blackwell, Georgie, B.A Richmond, Va. 

Blankenship, Rebecca, B.A Charlotte 

Blevins, Mary Nance, B.S.S.A Dobson 

Boehret, Alice C, B.A Melrose Park, Pa. 

Bost, June, B.A High Point, Rt. 5 

Bowles, Frances, B.A Winston-Salem 

Brantley, Joanne, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Bronstein, Bernice, B.A Kinston 

Brooks, Jean, B.A Nutley, N. J. 

Brown, Barbara Ann, B.A Charlotte 

Brown, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Weaverville 

Brown, Olivia, B.S.H.E Richlands 

Bruin, Alyce, B.A Arlington, Va. 

Brumfield, Alice, B.A Yadkinville 

Brumley, Jane, B.S.H.E Gastonia 

Brunson, Mary Lynn, B.S.S.A Orangeburg, S. C. 

Buck, Lois, B.A Uniontown, Pa. 

Burke, Martha, B.S.P.E Winston-Salem 

Burns, Elizabeth, B.A Fayetteville 

Bush, Ellen Mark, B.A Charleston, W. Va. 

Butler, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Winston- Salem 

Caldwell, Fair, B.A Charlotte 

Caldwell, Virginia, B.A Winston-Salem 

Callahan, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Union Level, Va. 

Callahan, Elizabeth, B.A Franklin 

Calvert, Sallie, B.A Jackson 

Cameron, Flora, B.A Pinehurst 

Campbell, Nancy Reid, B.A Newton 

Carpenter, Joyce, B.A Gastonia 

Carson, Allein, B.A College Park, Ga. 

Carter, June, B.A Rockingham 

Cassidy, Margaret, B.A Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 

Champion, Joan, B.A Cartersville, Ga. 

Chandler, June, B.A Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Chipley, Ann, B.F.A Rocky Mount 

Clarke, Rita Northf ork, W. Va. 

Coble, Mildred, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Connolly, Barbara, B.S.H.E Reidsville 

Cooke, Elizabeth L., B.A Winston-Salem 

Coppala, Peggy, B.A Charlotte 

Covington, Vela, B.S.N Shelby, Rt. 4 



230 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Crawford, Elisabeth, B.A Roanoke, Va. 

Cunning, Patricia, B.A Bloomfield, N. J. 

Davenport, Ruby, B.S.H.E Sanford 

Davis, Dolly, B.A Atlanta, Ga. 

Davis, Frances Lee, B.A Wadesboro 

Debnam, Sara Louise, B.A Snow Hill 

DeVoe, Wilma, B.A Hohokus, N. J. 

Dickey, Nancy, B.A Kings Mountain 

Dobbins, Marguerite, B.S.H.E Gastonia 

Drum, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Newton 

Eaton, Sarah, B.S.S.A Zebulon 

Edens, Kathleen, B.S.H.E Lumberton 

Edmunds, Jane, B.A Lynchburg, Va. 

Eichenbaum, Lillian, B.A Hackensack, N. J. 

Eldridge, Margharetta, B.A Nyack, N. Y. 

Ellen, Margaret, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Elliott, Mary, B.A Norfolk, Va. 

Elliott, Ruth, B.A Greensboro 

Ellis, Ruth, B.A. High Point 

Everett, Margaret, B.A Rockingham 

Farley, Jean, B.A Philadelphia, Pa. 

Featherstone, Gwendolyn, B.S.H.E Gastonia 

Fehr, Barbara, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Ferguson, Joan L., B.A E. Braintree, Mass. 

Ferguson, Jo Anne, B.S.S.A Havelock 

Fipps, Mona, B.A Chadbourn 

Fisher, Eulene, B.A Salisbury 

Fisher, Jean, B.S.H.E White Plains, N. Y. 

Fisher, Patricia, B.A Wallaston, Mass. 

Fletcher, Muriel, B.S.S.A Detroit, Mich. 

Forsyth, Alyce, B.A Greensboro 

Franklin, Ann, B.S.P.E Charlotte 

Garver, Marilyn, B.A Wilmington 

Gary, Patricia, B.S.M Charlotte 

Gaugler, Gloria, B.A Saddle River, N. J. 

Glasgow, Jane, B.A Littleton, Rt. 2 

Gottschall, Elizabeth, B.A Coral Gables, Fla. 

Greene, Betty Jane, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Greenlee, Nancy, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Griffin, Carolyn W., B.S.P.E Elizabeth City, Rt. 2 

Grinnells, Anne, B.A Raleigh 

Hamrick, Dorothy, B.S.M Davidson 

Handler, Janet, B.A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hardaway, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Columbus, Ga. 






Student List 231 

Harkey, Marie, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Harper, Edna, B.A Kinston, Rt. 4 

Harrison, Doris, B.A Winston-Salem 

Harrison, Rae, B.A Wilson 

Haskins, Fay, B.A Columbus, Ga. 

Head, Jane, B.F.A Wilmington, Rt. 3 

Hicks, Helen, B.S.H.E Wilmington 

Hill, Marilyn, B.A Cranston, R. I. 

Hiott, Malynda, B.F.A Kernersville 

Holland, Irene, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Holland, Sara, B.A Raleigh 

Holmes, Mary, B.A Edenton 

Hord, Mary Ruth, B.A Charlotte 

Hubbard, Patricia, B.A Jamestown 

Hughes, Anne Fahey, B.F.A Cumberland, Md. 

Hunsinger, Patricia, B.A Ridgewood, N. J. 

Hunter, Kate, B.S.H.E Tobaccoville 

Hutchinson, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Charlotte 

Ingram, Virginia S., B.F.A Winston-Salem 

Jacobs, Rosemary, B.A Winston-Salem 

Jacobson, Inge, B.A Woodmere, N. Y. 

James, Lydia, B.S.M Wilson 

Jefferson, Joyce, B.F.A. Chapel Hill 

Jeffries, Barbara, B.A Wilson 

Jeffries, Margaret, B.A Culpeper, Va. 

Jenkins, Faye, B.S.H.E Stecoah 

Johnson, Louise, B.A Reidsville, Rt. 6 

Jones, Nancy, B.A Concord, Rt. 2 

Jones, Nellie, B.A High Point 

Jordan, Martha, B.S.M Carolina Beach 

Jordan, Patsy, B.S.P.E Smithfield 

Keller, Barbara, B.A Darien, Conn. 

King, Wilma, B.F.A Greensboro, Rt. 5 

Kirby, Rebecca, B.A Granite Falls 

Kyzer, Mildred, B.S.S.A Hamlet 

Lambeth, Jean Anne, B.A Lumberton 

Lambeth, Katherine, B.A Brown Summit 

Lamm, Ramona, B.S.S.A Lucama, Rt. 1 

Large, Janet, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount 

Lawson, Sally, B.S.P.E Stoneham, Mass. 

Leathers, Frances Ann, B.A Gastonia 

Lee, Alice Ehrie, B.S.S.A Benson 

Lewis, Sarah Alice, B.S.H.E Union Mills, Rt. 2 

Lilley, Alma Grey, B.S.S.A Farmville 



232 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Lloyd, Rebecca, B.A Greensboro 

Long, Frances, B.A Blanch 

Loughead, ,Katherine, B.A Norfolk, Va. 

Luke, Helen Margaret, B.A Charleston, S. C. 

Lyon, Dixon, B.A Allenhurst, N. J. 

McAdams, Betty, B.A Albemarle 

McAdams, Marian, B.S.P.E Wilmington 

McArthur, Oriana, B.A Lumberton 

McCall, Nancy, B.A Reidsville, Rt. 4 

McCormick, Neva, B.S.S.A Coral Gables, Fla. 

McKeithan, Alston, B.A Gastonia 

McKinney, Margaret, B.A High Point 

McNair, Elinor, B.A Sanford 

McNairy, Betty Jean, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

McNeely, Jean, B.A Mooresville 

Magee, Beatrice, B.S.H.E Candler, Rt. 1 

Mahan, Shirley, B.A Newton, Mass. 

Mamber, Helen, B.A Miami Beach, Fla. 

Marrow, Jean, B.S.S.A Smithfield 

Marrus, Naomi, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Marshall, Katherine, B.S.P.E Clearwater, Fla. 

Mason, Wyndall, B.A Charlotte 

Metz, Ellen, B.A Summerfield 

Miller, Constance, B.A Wilmington, Del. 

Miller, Eva, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Miller, Martha Rose, B.S.P.E Mocksville, Rt. 2 

Miller, Patsy Ellen, B.A Baltimore, Md. 

Mobley, Betty, B.A Columbus, Ga. 

Moeller, Marilyn, B.S.H.E Towson, Md. 

Montgomery, Nancy, B.S.P.E Reidsville 

Moody, Helen, B.A Siler City 

Moomau, Barbara, B.A Westport, Conn. 

Moore, Melrose, B.A Brown Summit 

Morrill, Florence, B.A Wilson 

Muller, Naoma, B.F.A Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 

Neal, Allene, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Newman, Elizabeth, B.A Fanwood, N. J. 

Newton, Lois, B.A Raleigh 

Nixon, Nurry, B.A Raleigh 

Norwood, Mary, B.S.M Brevard 

Ogilvie, Sally, B.S.P.E Joplin, Mo. 

Pantelakos, Penelope, B.A Rocky Mount 

Parker, Joyce Cecelia, B.S.M Salisbury 

Parks, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Elkin 



Student List 233 

Parrish, Florence, B.A Pikeville 

Payne, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Wilmington 

Pegg, Jo Ann, B.A Kernersville 

Pilley, Helen, B.A Pantego 

Pitt, Vivian, B.S.S.A Oxford, Pa. 

Poole, Doris, B.F.A Raleigh 

Porter, Nancy Ann, B.S.P.E Cincinnati, Ohio 

Potter, Rose, B.A Winston-Salem 

Preston, Mary Ann, B.S.H.E Coral Gables, Fla. 

Quick, Catharine, B.A Bloomfield, N. J. 

Quinn, Jerry Ann, B.A Burlington 

Rader, Betty Anne, B.S.S.A Mayodan 

Raub, Joanne, B.A Kingston, Pa. 

Redman, Margaret, B.S.H.E Walnut Cove 

Renegar, Peggy Lee, B.A Yadkinville, Rt. 3 

Reynolds, Jacqueline, B.S.H.E Leland, R.F.D. 

Rierson, Eleanor, B.A Roanoke, Va., Rt. 7 

Rigney, Eleanor, B.A Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. 

Riley, Betty Tuttle, B.A Waynesville 

Robinson, Harriett, B.A Portland, Conn. 

Rock, Mary Worth, B.A Broadway 

Rogers, C. Ann, B.A Durham 

Romef elt, Mary, B.A. Glen Rock, N. J. 

Rosenberger, Lillian, B.S.H.E Lynchburg, Va. 

Rothenberg, Jeanne, B.A Richmond, Va. 

Rowe, Gladys, B.A Aberdeen 

Royster, Ann, B.S.M Henderson 

Rumley, Ruby, B.A Winston-Salem, Rt. 7 

Sabiston, Alma, B.A Jacksonville 

Sale, Dorothy, B.A Hopewell, Va. 

Samuelson, Esther, B.A Providence, R. I. 

Sanders, Barbara, B.S.M Warrenton, Va. 

Sanders, Betty Jean, B.A Charlotte 

Saunders, Mary Lela, B.A Danville, Va. 

Schrum, Amelia, B.S.S.A Lincolnton 

Seitz, Alice, B.A Gaffney, S. C. 

Senter, Eleanor, B.A Raleigh 

Setzer, Betty E., B.S.S.A Newton 

Shackelford, Mary Frances, B.S.H.E Kinston 

Sharpe, Dora Lee, B.S.N Greensboro, Rt. 8 

Shaw, Marie, B.A Fayetteville 

Shaw, Marilyn, B.A Nutley, N. J. 

Shepherd, Mary, B.A Laurinburg 

Shiver, Frances, B.A Charlotte 

Shoemaker, Joanne, B.A Charlotte 



234 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Shuler, Betty, B.A Rocky Mount 

Shuler, Mary Paul, B.A Fayetteville 

Siceloff , Nell, B.A High Point 

Sigmon, Adelaide, B.S.S.A Newton 

Skeels, Eleanor, B.A Fayetteville 

Slaughter, Christine, B.S.M Roxboro, Rt. 2 

Slaughter, Letty Bond, B.A Charlotte 

Smith, Davilla, B.F.A Winston-Salem 

Smith, Helene, B.A Utica, N. Y. 

Smith, Jean, B.S.P.E Cherokee 

Smith, Ruth F., B.A Port Washington, L. I., N. Y. 

Stacy, Sara, B.A Ruffin 

Stallings, Jean, B.S.P.E Erwin 

Stephenson, Frances, B.A Reidsville 

Stoughton, Barbara, B.F.A Raleigh 

Strother, Louise, B.S.S.A Franklinton, Rt. 1 

Swift, Shirley, B.A Sherwood 

Talley, Martha, B.S.M Greensboro 

Teague, Betty Jane, B.A Sanford 

Teague, Jeanne, B.A High Point 

Thigpen, Hattie, B.A Scotland Neck 

Thomann, Sylvia, B.A Nutley, N. J. 

Thomas, Betty, B.S.S.A Rockingham 

Thompson, Virginia C, B.A Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Tolar, Anne, B.A Fayetteville 

Tomlinson, Jane, B.A High Point 

Trevathan, Vivian, B.S.S.A Dobson 

Trogdon, Jane, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Truitt, Elizabeth, B.A Sparta 

Tyson, Betsy, B.A Lucama 

Umfleet, Wilma, B.S.N Hendersonville 

Urdaneta, Ines, B.S.H.E Colombia, South America 

Vail, Muriel, B.A Warwick, N. Y. 

Varner, Ann, B.A Salisbury 

Waddell, Anna Lee, B.S.H.E Wadesboro, Rt. 1 

Wagner, Ann Lee, B.S.P.E Chatham, N. J. 

Wagner, Luna, B.S.N Black Mountain 

Wagoner, Barbara, B.A Greensboro 

Walker, Doris, B.A Manteo 

Warden, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Yadkinville 

Ware, Betsy, B.S.H.E Reidsville 

West, Emma Faye, B.A Kinston 

Westmoreland, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Rural Hall 

Whitehead, Irma, B.S.N Hobgood 

Whitfield, Leah, B.A Winston-Salem 



Student List 235 

Williams, Anne Early, B.A Rocky Mount 

Williams, Sarah Ann, B.A Wilson 

Williams, Shirley, B.A Richmond, Va. 

Wilson, Alice Faye, B.A Kernersville 

Wilson, June Anna, B.A High Point, Rt. 4 

Woodworth, Naomi, B.A Braintree, Mass. 

Worrell, Frances, B.A Erwin 

Wray, Kathleen, B.A Shelby 

Young, Shirley, B.S.S.A Coral Gables, Fla. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Abdalla, Mary, B.A Selma 

Abernathy, Inza, B.S.S.A Valdese 

Adkins, Nellie Grey, B.A Franklinton 

Albritton, Virginia, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Alexander, Betty Sue, B.F.A Greensboro 

Alford, Jacqueline, B.A Middlesex, Rt. 2 

Allen, Martha, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Alley, Theresa, B.S.M Waynesville 

Alston, Margaret, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Annis, Eleanor, B.S.H.E Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Arden, Caroline, B.A High Point 

Armitage, Jane, B.A Smithfield 

Ashe, Bonnie Brown, B.A Lumberton 

Ashley, Patricia, B.S.P.E Smithfield 

Atkins, Nancy, B.S.M Durham 

Austin, Joan, B.A Brevard 

Averitt, Marie, B.A Clayton 

Aycock, Jean, B.S.M Fremont 

Ayers, Enid, B.A Lexington 

Ayers, Virginia, B.A Fayetteville 

Ballard, Nancy, B.A Ellerbe 

Banner, Clara, B.A Burnsville 

Barber, Elizabeth W., B.A Wilkesboro 

Barber, Rosemary, B.S.P.E Atlanta, Ga. 

Barker, Sara Lee, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Barlow, Mellie, B. A Wilmington 

Bass, Irene, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Bass, Jane, B.A Spring Hope 

Bassett, Mary Frances, B.A Asheville 

Baxley, Ann, B.S.N Wagram 

Bell, Coan, B.A Fayetteville 

Bell, Helen Joyce, B.A Raleigh 

Bennett, Jane, B.A Rocky Mount 

Bentley, Margaret, B.A Greensboro 



236 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Bergen, Ann, B.S.S.A Oxford 

Berger, Shirley, B.A Wilmington 

Berry, Shirley, B.S.N Durham 

Bivens, Betty, B.A Albemarle 

Bizzell, Hester Anne, B.S.M Newton Grove 

Black, Mary Louise, B.F.A Pinehurst 

Blackman, Ruth, B.A Smithfield 

Blackwell, Emily, B.S.M Pine Hall 

Blake, Olive, B.A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Blalock, Evelyn, B.A Asheboro 

Blanton, Nancy, B.A Walkertown 

Bledsoe, Jane, B.S.H.E Laurel Springs 

Blum, Jane, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Bogart, Penelope, B.S.S.A Washington 

Bondurant, Montine, B.S.P.E Draper 

Bouhoys, Bella, B.S.S.A Enka 

Bowman, Bulow, B.S.P.E Charlotte 

Bradley, Dorothy, B.S.N Forest City 

Brewer, Berta, B.A Roseboro 

Brooks, Josephine, B.A Raleigh 

Brothers, Ann, B.A New Bern 

Brown, Barbara Anne, B.A Winston-Salem 

Brown, Elizabeth H., B.A Winston-Salem 

Brown, Evelyn, B.A Sparta 

Brown, Jane, B.A Goldsboro 

Brown, Joyce, B.S.N Statesville 

Brown, Sarah E., B.S.P.E Spencer 

Bryan, Josephine, B.A Lillington 

Buck, Margie, B.S.S.A Kinston 

Bugg, Nellie, B.A Macon 

Bullard, Virginia, B.S.N Clemmons, Rt. 1 

Bunch, Charlotte, B.S.M Edenton 

Burchette, Pauline, B.A Ronda 

Burnette, Kathleen, B.S.S.A Marion, Rt. 3 

Burton, Nancy, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Byrd, Carol, B.A Greensboro 

Byrd, Doris, B.F.A Lenoir, Rt. 2 

Cahill, Mary, B.A Braintree, Mass. 

Callender, Arlene, B.A Greensboro 

Calvin, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Canton 

Cameron, Leona, B.S.H.E Cameron, Rt. 1 

Cameron, Peggy, B.S.P.E Southern Pines 

Camlin, Ann, B.S.S.A Hamlet 

Campbell, Frances, B.A Pinehurst 

Campbell, Mary Anne, B.A Washington 

Carlton, Faye, B.A Albemarle 



Student List 237 

Carroll, Maria, B.A Oxford 

Carter, Sarah, B.A Winston- Salem 

Cathey, Carlene, B.A Gastonia 

Cecil, Betty Sue, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Chamberlain, Page, B.F.A Slingerlands, N. Y. 

Chandler, Annette, B.A Asheville 

Cheney, Sally, B.A Pinehurst 

Christian, Carroll, B.A Charlotte 

Christian, Jeanette, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Clark, Frances, B.A Fayetteville 

Clay, Anne, B.A Hilton Village, Va. 

Clodfelter, Dorothy, B.S.H.E High Point 

Coats, Jocelyn, B.S.P.E Smithfield 

Coble, Elizabeth Anne, B.S.H.E Guilford College, Rt. 1 

Coker, Evangeline, B.S.H.E Garysburg, Rt. 1 

Cole, Virginia, B.A Salisbury 

Collins, Barbara, B.S.H.E Reidsville, Rt. 1 

Cone, Cecelia, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Cooper, Roberta, B.A Asheville 

Copeland, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Corbitt, Nancy, B.A Gatesville 

Correll, Anne, B.A Winston- Salem 

Cox, Ann, B.A Mt. Olive 

Cox, Catharine, B.S.M. Carthage 

Cragan, Ann, B.A Sanford 

Crouch, Pickett, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Crowder, Rebecca, B.A Peachland 

Crumpler, Dixie Dean, B.S.S.A Clinton, Rt. 1 

Culbreth, Gray, B.S.S.A Wilson 

Cusick, Josephine, B.S.H.E , Raleigh 

Darnall, Mary, B.A Fayetteville, W. Va. 

Daughtridge, Nadia, B.A Rocky Mount 

Davis, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Blanch, Rt. 1 

Davis, Evelyn, B.F.A Webster 

Davis, Jane Campbell, B.A Carthage 

Davis, Marian, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Davis, Paula, B.F.A Goldsboro 

Day, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Smithfield 

Deans, Ann, B.S.S.A Wilson 

Deans, Kathleen, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Dearman, Evelyn, B.S.S.A Harmony 

Dickens, Patricia, B.S.S.A Thomasville 

Dietz, Carolyn, B.F.A Spray 

D'Lugin, Lorraine, B.A Wilmington 

Dobbins, Kathryn, B.S.H.E Yadkinville 

Dobson, Laurah, B.A Statesville, Rt. 2 



238 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Dobson, Ruth George, B.A High Point 

Dodson, Laura, B.S.N Reidsville 

Doughton, Rosemond, B.A Sparta 

Drennen, Janet, B.A Carneys Point, N. J. 

Dukes, Katherine, B.A Ahoskie, Rt. 2 

Dunn, Marilyn, B.A Roseboro 

Dwyer, Doris, B.S.S.A Kannapolis, Rt. 4 

Early, Elaine, B.S.S.A Arlington, Va. 

Eddy, Jane Lee, B.A Fayetteville 

Edwards, Anne, B.A New Bern 

Elliott, Esther, B.S.M Roanoke, Va. 

Elliott, Nancy, B.S.H.E Stony Point 

Ellis, Suzanne, B.A Greensboro 

English, Mary Jane, B.S.H.E Ashford 

Etheridge, Corinne, B.S.S.A : Whitakers 

Everett, Annice, B.S.S.A Laurinburg 

Everett, Betty, B.S.M Raleigh 

Ezzell, Annette, B.A Dunn 

Farlow, Mildred, B.A Randleman, Rt. 1 

Farmer, Ann, B.A Wilmington 

Ferguson, Margie, B.A Reidsville 

Ferguson, Mildred, B.A Belmont 

Fisher, Margaret, B.S.N Ridgewood, N. J. 

Fisher, Mary Gladys, B.S.S.A Granite Quarry 

FitzGerald, Elizabeth, B.A Chevy Chase, Md. 

Flack, Ann, B.A Forest City 

Flanagan, Ora Lee, B.S.N Farmville 

Fleet, Mary Elizabeth, B.A Rocky Mount 

Floyd, Jean, B.F.A Charlotte 

Ford, Jean, B.A Westport, Conn. 

Forney, Anne, B.S.N Westport, Conn., Rt. 2 

Foster, Blanche, B.S.S.A Blanch 

Foster, Rowena, B.A Winston- Salem, Rt. 2 

Fowler, Ann, B.S.S.A Durham 

Fowler, Patricia, B.S.S.A Durham 

Fulcher, Frances, B.A Davidson 

Fuller, Barbara, B.A Greensboro 

Funk, Faye, B.S.N Gastonia 

Gallagher, Lora, B.A Greensboro 

Gallagher, Muriel, B.A Ridgewood, N. J. 

Gambill, Johnsie, B.S.H.E Sparta 

Gandy, Betty Sue, B.A Darlington, S. C, Rt. 3 

Garris, Lula, B.S.N Lilesville 

Garvin, Barbara, B.S.M Spruce Pine 

Gettys, Emmalynn, B.A Bostic 



Student List 239 

Gibbs, Mary, B.A Warrenton 

Glaser, Virginia, B.A West Orange, N. J. 

Godwin, Betty Alice, B.S.P.E Fayetteville 

Gonella, Miriam, B.S.M Franklinton 

Goudelock, Ann, B.S.P.E Monroe 

Grady, Mary Grace, B.A Kinston 

Gray, Mary Eleanor, B.F.A Lexington 

Green, Elsie, B.S.H.E Waynesville 

Green, Emily, B.A Winston-Salem 

Greene, Tommie, B.S.S.A Washington 

Gregg, Virginia, B.S.S.A Wilmington 

Grier, Anne, B.S.P.E Smithfield 

Griffin, Mary Ellen, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City 

Griffin, Mary Louise, B.S.H.E Williamston 

Grigg, Jane, B.A Lincolnton 

Grill, Catherine, B.S.S.A Valdese 

Griswold, Eleanor, B.A Durham 

Groce, Carolyn, B.S.N Greensboro 

Haase, Shirley, B.S.P.E Charlotte 

Haley, Betsy, B.S.P.E Elon College 

Hall, Mary Ruth, B.A Brevard 

Hallenbeck, Dorothy, B.A Charlotte 

Hamilton, Mary Anne, B.S.M Wilmington 

Hamilton, Sarah Ann, B.S.S.A Smithfield 

Hamlet, Nancy, B.S.S.A Statesville 

Hamrick, Sally Jo, B.A Tryon 

Harbison, Frances, B.A Morganton 

Harden, Glenn Abbott, B.A Greensboro 

Harding, Elizabeth, B.A Cana 

Harper, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Deep Run 

Harrell, Betty Ann, B.S.H.E Morganton 

Harris, Betty Jean, B.A Oxford 

Harriss, Winifred, B.A Wilmington 

Hart, Jean, B.A Oxford, Rt. 4 

Hart, Virginia, B.S.S.A Mooresville, Rt. 3 

Hawk, Jane, B.A New Bern 

Haynes, Bobbie Jean, B.A Gastonia 

Henderson, Elizabeth, B.F.A Burlington 

Hendrix, Edith, B.S.H.E Rockingham 

Hester, Jean, B.S.S.A Roxboro 

Higgins, Joanna, B.S.P.E Darien, Conn. 

High, Helen, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount 

Hilton, Elizabeth, B.F.A Asheville 

Hines, Marian, B.A Wilmington 

Hinnant, Mary, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Hoffner, Jean, B.A Greensboro 



240 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hogshead, Jean, B.A Greensboro 

Holbrook, Gustavia, B.A Rocky Mount 

Holder, Nancy, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Holly, Kathryn, B.F.A Marshville 

Holmes, Margaret, B.S.H.E Wilmington 

Holton, Martha, B.A Wilmington 

Holtzclaw, Jane, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Horton, Jeannette, B.S.S.A Zebulon, Rt. 4 

Hovis, Doris, B.A Charlotte, Rt. 3 

Howard, Betsy Ann, B.S.M Salemburg 

Howell, Frances, B.A Candler, Rt. 3 

Hudson, Jane, B.A Halifax, Va., Rt. 1 

Huggins, Miriam, B.A Shannon, Rt. 1 

Hughes, Tempe, B.A Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Hunnings, Carolyn, B.S.H.E New Bern 

Hunt, Mary Anne, B.A Lexington 

Hunter, Amelia Ann, B.A Charlotte 

Hunter, Margaret, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Ingram, Ann, B.S.S.A Mount Gilead 

Ingram, Frances, B.A Kernersville, Rt. 2 

Jackson, Sarah, B.A Washington, Rt. 1 

Jacobson, Florence, B.S.H.E Asheville 

Jarosz, Myra, B.S.S.A Graham 

Johnson, Alma J., B.S.H.E Union Grove 

Johnson, Elizabeth Grey, B.S.S.A Smithfield 

Johnson, Grace, B.F.A Rocky Mount 

Johnson, Margaret Ann, B.A Robersonville 

Johnson, Mary Katharine, B.A Winston- Salem 

Johnston, Anne, B.A Kelford 

Jones, Jean L., B.S.S.A Salisbury 

Jordan, Eloise, B.A Milton, Rt. 1 

Kearns, Waldeen, B.F.A Randleman, Rt. 1 

Kennedy, Polly Jean, B.A Wallace 

Key, Virginia, B.S.H.E Robbins 

Kilgore, Katherine, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

King, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Statesville, Rt. 2 

Kinsman, Barbara, B.S.P.E Longmeadow, Mass. 

Kirkpatrick, Nancy, B.A Waynesville 

Kline, Phyllis, B.A Asheville 

Kuykendall, Cornelia, B.S.P.E Madison 

Lambert, Julia Ross, B.A Asheboro 

Lambert, Peggy, B.S.H.E Kannapolis 

Lancaster, Nellie Rose, B.A Louisburg 

Lancaster, Sarah, B.A Pikeville, Rt. 2 

Lanier, Beatrice, B.S.S.A Chinquapin 



Student List 241 

Lathan, Betty Mae, B.S.S.A Monroe, Rt. 5 

Leach, Eleanor, B.S.N Raeford 

Leafe, Margaret, B.A Badin 

Lee, Patsie Lane, B.S.S.A Durham 

Levin, Ruth, B.A Burlington 

Linville, Ann, B.A Kernersville 

Little, Ann, B.A Statesville 

Littlefield, Martha, B.A Savannah, Ga. 

Liverman, Carolyn, B.A Ahoskie 

Lloyd, Jean, B.S.S.A Sanford 

Lloyd, Marie, B.S.S.A Efland 

Lomax, Frances, B.A Charlotte 

Long, Elaine, B.A Hurdle Mills, Rt. 2 

Lovelace, Mary, B.S.M Macclesfield 

Lowe, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Lowrance, Ann Sharpe, B.A Statesville 

Lowrey, Mildred, B.S.S.A Winston- Salem 

Loyd, Elizabeth, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Lyerly, Doris, B.S.P.E Salisbury 

Lynam, Francie, B.A Morganton 

Lynch, Elizabeth, B.A Kings Mountain 

Lynch, Virginia, B.A Rowland 

Lyon, Naida, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

McCall, Claire, B.A Charlotte 

MacCallum, Betty, B.A Lumberton 

McClure, Jacqueline, B.A Douglaston, N. Y. 

McCormac, Sue M., B.A Rowland 

McDaniel, Jane, B.A Kinston 

McDowell, Joyce, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

McFadden, Thelma, B.A Asheville 

Mclnnis, Betty, B.A Henderson 

Mclnnis, Jean, B.S.M Pleasant Garden 

Mclver, Flora, B.S.H.E Wilmington 

McKeithan, Lydia, B.A Raeford 

McLean, Josephine, B.A Lumberton 

McLemore, Ethel, B.S.N Wade, Rt. 1 

McManus, Meta, B.A Red Springs 

Mangum, Barbara, B.A Burlington 

Martel, Dorothy, B.A Waynesville 

Massie, Geneva, B.S.H.E Canton, Rt. 2 

Matheson, Lottie, B.A Ahoskie 

Maughan, Mary, B.A Durham 

Mellonas, Patricia, B.A High Point 

Memory, Elizabeth, B.A Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Mendelsohn, Sue, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Mercer, Rosalind, B.A Chadbourn, Rt. 1 



242 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Merrill, Betty Lou, B.A Beaufort 

Metz, Gretchen, B.S.H.E Summerfield 

Mewborn, Edith, B.A Snow Hill, Rt. 2 

Miller, Helen, B.S.H.E Winston- Salem, Rt. 4 

Miller, Jewel, B.A Winston- Salem 

Miller, Margaret, B.S.H.E Statesville 

Miller, Mary Ruth, B.S.H.E Laurel Springs 

Mills, Emma, B.S.P.E Polkton, Rt. 1 

Mills, Frieda, B.A Charlotte, Rt. 1 

Mitchell, Betty Lou, B.A , Burlington 

Mitchell, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Winston- Salem 

Monnett, Mary Lou, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Rt. 1 

Montague, Jaylee, B.A Clayton, Rt. 2 

Montgomery, Jeanne, B.S.M High Point 

Montgomery, Margaret, B.A Farmington 

Moore, Ann, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City 

Moore, Betty Lou, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Moore, A. Jane, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Moore, Jeanne, B.S.S.A Forest City 

Moore, Julia, B.A Ahoskie, Rt. 4 

Moore, Reta, B.A Leaksville 

Moore, Sterling, B.A Warrenton 

Morgan, Carol Lee, B.A Henderson, Rt. 5 

Morgan, Marie, B.S.H.E Gold Hill, Rt. 1 

Morris, Peggy, B.S.S.A , . Albemarle 

Morrison, Betty Noble, B.A Asheville 

Morriss, Cecilia, B.A Farmville 

Moutafis, Christine, B.A Greensboro 

Mueller, Joan, B.A Westfield, N. J. 

Muth, Ruth, B.A Charlotte 

Myers, Sara, B.S.S.A Hoffman 

Niven, Phyllis, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Norfleet, Dorothy, B.A Greensboro 

Nurnberger, Carolyn, B.A Wilmington 

O'Connor, Frances, B.A Greensboro 

Oliver, Catherine, B.A Reidsville 

Osborne, Jessie Rae, B.S.S.A Swepsonville 

Osheroff , Eileen, B.A Charlotte 

Outlaw, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Mount Olive 

Owen, Joyce, B.S.S.A Bluefield, W. Va. 

Parker, Elizabeth Pierce, B.S.H.E Raeford, Rt. 2 

Parker, Irene Elizabeth, B.A Williamston 

Parrish, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Smithfield 

Paton, Patricia, B.A Fayetteville 

Pearce, Geraldine, B.S.S.A Micro 



Student List 243 

Pearsall, Hazelbelle, B.A Rocky Mount 

Pearson, Caroline, B.S.H.E Baltimore, Md. 

Peters, Peggy, B.A High Point 

Petteway, Betty, B.F.A Jacksonville 

Phelps, Marilyn, B.A Charlotte 

Phillips, Martha, B.A Thomasville 

Pickel, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Clemmons, Rt. 2 

Pitman, Jean, B.S.M East Hartford, Conn. 

Plyler, Edith, B.S.H.E Gold Hill, Rt. 2 

Pool, Zilphia, B.A Greensboro 

Poole, Rachel, B.S.H.E Thomasville 

Pope, Carmen, B.A Creedmoor, Rt. 1 

Powell, Anne, B.A Albemarle 

Powell, Emogene, B.A Valdese 

Preas, Nancy, B.A Danville, Va. 

Price, Chattie, B.S.H.E Monroe, Rt. 2 

Pritchard, Jane, B.S.H.E South Mills, Rt. 1 

Pritchett, Nancy, B.S.S.A Burlington 

Proctor, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Elm City, Rt. 1 

Purves, Nancy, B.A Great Notch, N. J. 

Quinn, Cornelia, B.S.H.E Kenansville 

Ranson, Mary Emily, B.A Charlotte 

Ratcliffe, Hattie, B.A Charlotte 

Ray, Jane, B.S.H.E Mebane 

Ray, Jean, B.S.H.E Mebane 

Reaves, Harriet, B.A Graham 

Redding, Hilda, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Redman, Roberta, B.A Asheville 

Reid, Patricia, B.A Lowell 

Renegar, Colleen, B.S.M Yadkinville, Rt. 3 

Reynolds, Mary, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Richardson, Nell, B.S.S.A Wendell, Rt. 1 

Rigsby, Helen, B.A High Point 

Rimmer, Peggy, B.A Mebane 

Ritchie, Mary Margaret, B.F.A Greensboro 

Roberson, Betty Lea, B.S.M Greensboro 

Roberson, Marilyn, B.A Walkertown, Rt. 1 

Roberts, Jacqueline, B.A Durham 

Roberts, Marilea, B.S.H.E Reidsville, Rt. 4 

Robinson, Eleanor, B.A Charlotte 

Robinson, Emilie, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Robinson, Jean, B.S.S.A Hamlet 

Robinson, Joan, B.S.S.A Hamlet 

Rogers, Roberta Lee, B.A Raleigh 

Rollins, Millicent, B.S.S.A Marshville 

Rose, June, B.S.M High Point 



244 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Ross, Mary Jane, B.A Asheboro 

Routh, Katherine, B.S.S.A Guilford College, Rt. 1 

Ruiter, Jeannette, B.A Charlotte 

Russell, Ellen, B.S.H.E High Point 

Sanderford, Patricia, B.A Cary 

Sanderson, Margaret, B.S.N Four Oaks, Rt. 1 

Sandlin, Jeannette, B.S.S.A Bryson City 

Sandlin, Joyce, B.A Bryson City 

Sanford, Judith, B.A Chatham, N. J. 

Sarles, Helen Mae, B.S.M Greensboro 

Scarlette, Erma T., B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Schreffler, Barbara, B.A Raleigh 

Schryver, Sally, B.S.P.E Westport, Conn. 

Scott, Ora Lee, B.S.H.E Burlington, Rt. 2 

Sealy, Gladys, B.A Barnesville, Rt. 1 

Sechrest, Joanne, B.F.A. High Point 

Secrest, Anna Blair, B.A Monroe 

Selecman, Nancy, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Serr, Beverly, B.A Arlington, Va. 

Sharpe, Shirley, B.S.S.A Winston- Salem 

Shearin, Rose Ann, B.A Rocky Mount 

Sherron, Ann, B.A Burlington 

Sides, Jo Anne, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Sink, Kathryn, B.S.H.E Lexington 

Sink, Mildred, B.A Greensboro 

Skinner, Ellen, B.A Rocky Mount 

Sledge, Ruth, B.S.P.E Graham 

Smathers, Martha, B.A Canton 

Smith, Carolyn Sykes, B.S.S.A Lemon Springs 

Smith, Danny Kate, B.A Charlotte 

Smith, Doris Jane, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Smith, Eleanor, B.A Kinston 

Smith, Isabelle, B.A Gibson, Rt. 1 

Smith, Lavinia, B.A Charlotte 

Smith, Margaret, B.A Durham 

Smith, Nancy D., B.S.S.A Durham 

Smith, Nell, B.A Yanceyville 

Snider, Grevilda, B.A Denton, Rt. 1 

Snypes, Margaret, B.A Sanford 

Speas, Rosa Lee, B.S.S.A Winston- Salem, Rt. 2 

Spence, Mary Catherine, B.S.N Kinston 

Stanfield, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Brown Summit 

Stanley, Jeannine, B.A Carolina Beach 

Stephens, Lois, B.A Durham 

Stilwell, Mary Ann, B.A Charlotte 

Stone, Jane, B.A Jenkintown, Pa. 



Student List 245 

Stover, Betty Jeanne, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Strother, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Oxford 

Sugg, Mildred, B.A Kinston 

Sutker, Edith, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Sutton, Peggy, B.A Clinton 

Swindell, Jane, B.A Elizabeth City 

Swinson, Edwina, B.S.H.E Columbus, Ga. 

Sykes, LaVerne, B.S.S.A Durham 

Tallant, Peggy, B.A Hickory 

Talley, Ann, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Tanch, Elizabeth, B.A Pittsfield, Mass. 

Tanner, Sybil, B.A Wilmington 

Tart, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Dunn 

Taylor, Frances, B.S.S.A Durham 

Taylor, Lois, B.A Elon College 

Taylor, Mary Anna, B.S.S.A Williamston, Rt. 3 

Taylor, Wenonah Ruth, B.A Elon College 

Teer, Lydia, B.S.H.E Chapel Hill, Rt. 1 

Temko, Mimi, B.A Greensboro 

Thompson, Grace, B.S.H.E Laurinburg, Rt. 3 

Thompson, Mary Anne, B.A Saluda 

Thompson, Mary Lillie, B.A Clarkton, Rt. 1 

Thompson, Maxine, B.A Whiteville 

Thompson, Peggy, B.A Durham 

Thompson, Virginia Dare, B.S.S.A Whitakers 

Thorne, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Selma, Rt. 1 

Tunstall, Betsy, B.A Ahoskie 

Turlington, Sarah, B.S.H.E Clinton, Rt. 1 

Tyson, Joyce, B.A Farmville 

Van Horn, Anne, B.A Greensboro 

Vann, Jane, B.S.S.A Badin 

Veasey, Anne, B.A Washington 

Waggoner, Mary Lou, B.A Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 

Wall, Betty Jo, B.S.H.E Fletcher, Rt. 1 

Wallace, Hattie, B.A Kannapolis, Rt. 1 

Wallerstein, Hilda, B.A Richmond, Va. 

Ward, M. Wendy, B.F.A New York, N. Y. 

Warren, Peggy, B.A Hurdle Mills 

Weatherspoon, Mary, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Wellons, Anne, B.A Charlotte 

White, Anne Sherrill, B.S.H.E Mooresville 

White, Frances Marie, B.S.S.A Wendell 

White, Laura, B.F.A Greensboro 

White, Olivia, B.S.H.E Scotland Neck 

Whitehurst, Alice Marie, B.S.S.A South Mills, Rt. 1 



246 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Whitley, Nancy, B.S.H.E Zebulon 

Wilborn, Gwendolyn, B.A Lillington 

Wilkinson, Nan, B.A Rocky Mount 

Willard, Emma Jean, B.A Winston-Salem 

Williams, Betty Jo, B.S.H.E Monroe 

Williams, Cloise, B.S.H.E Statesville, Rt. 5 

Williams, Doris, B.S.H.E Lumberton 

Williams, Jacqueline, B.S.H.E Middlesex 

Williams, Nancy P., B.A Elizabeth City, Rt. 3 

Williams, Priscilla, B.S.P.E Durham 

Williamson, Addie, B.A Asheville 

Williamson, Louise, B.A Rocky Mount 

Williamson, Martha, B.A Lucama, Rt. 1 

Williford, Barbara, B.A Farmville 

Wilson, La Rue, B.A New Bern, Rt. 2 

Wimbish, Betty, B.A Greensboro 

Winningham, Nancy, B.S.H.E. . ^. Charlotte 

Winslow, Ann, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Winters, Dorothy, B.A Maxton 

Woodruff, Rebecca, B.A Oxford 

Workman, Patricia, B.A Burlington 

Worley, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Canton 

Worsley, Anne, B.A Oak City 

Yates, Beulah, B.S.H.E Elkin 

Yelton, Sybil, B.S.N Spindale 

Yelverton, Mae, B.S.P.E Fremont 

Young, Ann, B.A Rockford, 111. 

Young, Elizabeth Jane, B.A Charlotte 

Zachary, Lillian. B.S.S.A Taylorsville 

Zeiger, Sally-Ann, B.F.A Greensboro 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Adams, Mitchelene, B.S.P.E Reidsville 

Addison, Diana, B.A Durham 

Alderman, Suzanne, B.A Rye, N. Y. 

Alexander, Marverine, B.A Huntersville, Rt. 1 

Anderson, Dorothy, B.A Enfield, Rt. 1 

Anderson, Marion, B.S.M Shallotte 

Anderson, Patricia, B.A Greensboro 

Andrews, Jean, B.A Cumberland, Md. 

Angstadt, Sonia, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Anthony, Catherine, B.S.H.E Yadkinville, Rt. 3 

Arab, Nadya, B.S.N Fayetteville 

Armstrong, Isabel, B.A Greensboro 

Arthur, Margaret, B.A Kings Mountain 

Austin, Mary Gordon, B.A Jefferson 



Student List 247 

Bachman, Elizabeth, B.A Henderson 

Badgett, Emily, B.A Pilot Mountain 

Bailey, Nancy, B.A Chapel Hill 

Baker, Anne, B.A Lumberton 

Ball, Ethel Dae, B.S.P.E Thomasville 

Barbour, Amelia, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Barbour, Barbara, B.S.H.E Smithfield 

Barksdale, Bette, B.A Asheville 

Barlow, Mary Ann, B.S.H.E Hickory 

Barnes, Katherine, B.A Fayetteville, Rt. 3 

Barnes, Mary Louise, B.A Wilson 

Barrett, Dolores, B.A Oak City 

Barrett, Dora Mae, B.A Farmville 

Barringer, Bettie, B.A Hickory 

Barringer, Mattie, B.S.P.E Albemarle 

Barton, Nancy Lou, B.A Springfield, Mass. 

Bason, Erlene, B.A Greensboro 

Batts, Janet, B.F.A Jamestown, N. Y. 

Batts, Viola, B.A Greensboro 

Baucom, Elizabeth, B.A Raleigh, Rt. 2 

Baxley, Norma, B.A Rockingham 

Beamer, Mildred, B.S.H.E Mt. Airy, Rt. 4 

Beatty, Beulah, B.S.H.E Elizabethtown 

Beauford, Betty, B.S.H.E Draper 

Beck, Virginia, B.S.S.A Burlington 

Bell, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Charlotte 

Belton, Peggy, B.S.P.E Mt. Airy 

Bennett, Dorothy, B.A Rocky Mount 

Bennett, Sarah, B.A Stokesdale, Rt. 2 

Bernholz, Alice, B.A Woodmere, N. Y. 

Best, Evelyn, B.A Wallace, Rt. 2 

Biggerstaff, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Shelby 

Biggerstaff, Jimmie, B.S.S.A Marion 

Biggs, Joyce, B.A Beaufort 

Bikle, Mary Louise, B.A Hagerstown, Md. 

Bissette, Corinne, B.A Zebulon, Rt. 2 

Blackburn, Mary, B.S.S.A Colfax 

Blackwelder, Edith, B.S.P.E Charlotte, Rt. 4 

Blake, Marie, B.A Lumberton 

Blalock, Doris, B.A Burlington 

Blanchard, Carolyn, B.A Paw Creek 

Bland, Mattie Lou, B.S.H.E Vanceboro, Rt. 2 

Blumenthal, June, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 4 

Bobbitt, Jean, B.A Wilmington 

Bodie, Jacqueline, B.A Kannapolis 

Bolinger, Anita, B.S.H.E Vale, Rt. 1 



248 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Boney, Carolyn, B.A Midway Park 

Boney, Rosemary, B.S.H.E Clinton 

Boone, Eugenia, B.S.H.E Waynesville, Rt. 1 

Boone, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Louisburg, Rt. 4 

Boulus, Elizabeth, B.A Concord 

Boyette, Joyce, B.A Wilson 

Boykin, Sue, B.S.H.E Wilson 

Bracken, Elizabeth, B.A Charlotte 

Bradford, Anne, B.A Marshville 

Brady, Lois, B.S.S.A Benson 

Brake, Rosa Lee, B.S.H.E Battleboro, Rt. 1 

Brauer, Clara, B.A Norlina 

Breeden, Sara, B.S.S.A Morganton 

Britz, Betty, B.A Wilmington 

Brock, Coleen, B.A Fayetteville 

Brock, Mae, B.A Warsaw 

Brooks, Mary Virginia, B.A Hot Springs 

Brown, Barbara F., B.A Falls Church, Va. 

Brown, Eleanor, B.S.P.E Goldsboro 

Brown, Elizabeth Anne, B.A Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Brown, Fredia, B.A Burnsville 

Brown, Hope, B.S.H.E Burnsville 

Brown, Margaret, B.S.N Rocky Mount, Rt. 2 

Brown, Peggy, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Brumsey, Barbara, B.S.P.E Currituck 

Bullard, Elizabeth, B.A Charlotte 

Burleson, Hazel Ann, B.S.M Spruce Pine 

Burroughs, Betsy, B.S.S.A Durham 

Burton, Carolyn, B.F.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Butner, Lillian, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Buzzi, Eileen, B.A Nutley, N. J. 

Byrd, Glenna, B.A Marion 

Byrd, Martha, B.A Morganton, Rt. 1 

Cabaniss, Jane, B.F.A Shelby, Rt. 5 

Cahn, Catherine, B.A New Orleans, La. 

Caldwell, Elizabeth Ann, B.A Wrightsville Beach 

Caldwell, Madeleine, B.A Garden City, N. Y. 

Cameron, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Broadway, Rt. 1 

Cameron, Virginia, B.S.H.E Marion, Rt. 2 

Campbell, Jessie, B.A San Antonio, Texas 

Campbell, Kathleen, B.A Hamlet 

Campbell, Martha, B.A Winston-Salem 

Cannon, Jewelle, B.A Ayden 

Capps, Eva Kate, B.A Lucama 

Carr, Nancy, B.S.M Moorestown, N. J. 

Carter, Kathleen, B.S.M Charlotte 



Student List 249 

Cartwright, Bessie, B.A Hamptonville 

Case, Alta Jeanne, B.A High Point 

Casey, Joyce, B.S.H.E Burgaw 

Causey, Betty, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Champion, Evelyn, B.S.N Fayetteville 

Cheek, Erne Lou, B.S.H.E Rockwell 

Chestnut, Iris Hood, B.S.S.A Dover, Rt. 2 

Clegg, Frances, B.S.S.A Carthage 

Click, Margaret, B.F.A Elkin 

Cockrell, Jean, B.A Rocky Mount 

Coffey, Elizabeth, B.S.N Greensboro 

Coffey, Margaret, B.S.N Greensboro 

Coggin, Sara, B.A Winston- Salem 

Cohen, Joan, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Colkitt, Geraldyne, B.A , . . Wilmington 

Collison, Jane, B.S.M Greensboro 

Colthurst, Barbara, B.F.A Swannanoa, Rt. 1 

Coltrane, Sue, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Compton, Mary, B.A Bloomfield, N. J. 

Conley, Betty Jean, B.S.S.A Marion, Rt. 3 

Conner, Virginia, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Cooke, Carolyn, B.S.M Winston-Salem 

Cooley, Naomi, B.A Asheville 

Cooper, Elizabeth, B.A Raleigh, Rt. 4 

Corbett, Nova Ann, B.A Wilson's Mills 

Corpening, Dorothy, B.A Horse Shoe, Rt. 1 

Costello, Marie, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Coutras, Grace, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Cowdery, Dorothy, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Cox, Mary Josephine, B.A Charlotte 

Craft, Jo Ann, B.S.N Burlington 

Crawley, Elizabeth Anne, B.S.H.E Littleton 

Crockett, Bertha, B.S.S.A Wytheville, Va. 

Cropsey, Nancy, B.A Elizabeth City 

Cross, Nancy, B.A Ridgewood, N. J. 

Crouch, Peggy, B.S.N Troy 

Crowell, Lorraine, B.A Asheville, Rt. 3 

Cruse, Jean, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Culbert, Leola, B.A Marion, Va. 

Cummings, Diana, B.A Robbins 

Cushwa, Betty, B.A Roxboro 

Dail, Mary Sue, B.S.N Beaufort, R.F.D. 

Dale, Hazel, B.A Hickory 

David, Anne, B.A Asheville 

Davis, Alma, B.S.S.A Pikeville 

Davis, Christine, B.S.P.E Shelby, Rt. 4 



250 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Davis, Janet, B.S.P.E Robbins 

Davis, Miriam, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Davis, Nancy Sue, B.A Winston- Salem 

Day, Helen, B.S.M Garner 

Deal, Mildred, B.S.H.E Franklin, Rt. 4 

DeGruchy, Joan, B.S.H.E Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Devins, Kathryn, B.A Peekskill, N. Y. 

DeWitt, Glenna, B.A Greensboro 

Dietz, Margaret, B.A Spray 

Dillard, Bettye Jo, B.A Willard 

Dixon, Bettie Alice, B.A New Orleans, La. 

Dock, Margaret, B.A Balsam 

Dover, Vivian, B.S.S.A Shelby 

Driver, Mary Lu, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Dryden, Anne, B.A Wise 

Duke, Ann, B.F.A Rocky Mount 

Duncan, Betty, B.S.H.E Siler City, Rt. 3 

Dunham, Annette, B.S.H.E Elizabethtown, Rt. 1 

Dupree, Ellen, B.A Smithfield, Rt. 1 

Dwiggins, Jacquelyne, B.A. Greensboro 

Edwards, Marguerite, B.A Baton Rouge, La. 

Edwards, Vernie Mae, B.A Seaboard 

Ehret, Shirley Mae, B.S.S.A Henderson 

Elkins, Elizabeth Ann, B.A Murphy 

Elsen, Mary Frances, B.A Washington 

Ennis, Josephine, B.A Hickory 

Eubanks, Ellenor, B.S.M Hassell 

Evans, Bettye, B.A Nashville 

Everhart, Nancy, B.A Thomasville 

Everitt, Janet, B.S.S.A Selma 

Faggart, Betty Glyn, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Fain, Mildred, B.A Hendersonville, Rt. 5 

Farrior, Grace, B.S.P.E Burgaw 

Farthing, Dixie Rae, B.S.N Valle Crucis 

Faucette, Alice Wray, B.A Reidsville 

Feimster, Peggy, B.A Olin 

Ferebee, Sara Frances, B.A Ernul 

Fesperman, Katherine, B.A Burlington 

Fey, Anna, B.A Winston-Salem 

Fincher, Rose, B.S.M Concord, Rt. 3 

Finkelstein, Patricia, B.A Asheville 

Fisher, Mary R., B.A Roanoke Rapids 

Flanagan, Joanne, B.A Hendersonville 

Flow, Ella, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Floyd, Rebecca, B.A Tabor City 

Ford, Jessie, B.A Norfolk, Va. 



Student List 251 

Fox, Margaret, B.A Charlotte 

Francis, Virginia, B.A Waynesville 

Frank, Jo Ann, B.A Henderson 

Franklin, Louise, B.A Winston- Salem 

French, Betty, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Friday, Kathryn, B.A Salisbury 

Friedman, Edna, B.A Charlotte 

Frost, Billie Ann, B.A Mocksville, Rt. 2 

Furr, Katherine, B.A Franklin 

Garner, Daisy, B.S.H.E Pinehurst 

Gaskin, Lillian, B.A Albemarle 

Gatling, Hortense, B.A Charlotte 

Gay, Lucille, B.A Black Creek 

Gehman, Betsy, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Gekas, Amanda, B.A High Point 

Gibson, Nannie, B.S.H.E Mebane, Rt. 1 

Gilbert, Clara, B.A Siler City 

Gilbert, Elizabeth, B.A Wilmington 

Gilliam, Patricia, B.A Elon College, Rt. 2 

Gillikin, Peggy, B.S.M New Bern 

Glavich, Elsie, B.S.N Waynesville 

Goad, Patricia, B.A Kinston 

Gold, Adele, B.A Shelby, Rt. 4 

Gooch, Margaret, B.A Charlottesville, Va. 

Goodman, Jane, B.A Hewlett Bay Park, N. Y. 

Goss, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Asheville 

Gravely, Lillian Ann, B.S.H.E Brevard 

Gray, Nancy, B.F.A Robersonville 

Green, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Thomasville 

Green, Margaret, B.A Thomasville 

Green, Martha, B.S.H.E Ramseur, Rt. 1 

Greenberg, Bernice, B.A Greensboro 

Greenblatt, Shirley, B.A Vineland, N. J. 

Greene, Kathryn, B.A Marion 

Greene, Mary Ellen, B.A Mt. Gilead 

Griffin, Ann, B.A Selma 

Griggs, Barbara, B.S.N Pageland, S. C. 

Guthrie, Caroline, B.A Graham 

Hack, Shirley, B.S.S.A Nutley, N. J. 

Hackney, Rachel, B.A Siler City, Rt. 3 

Hall, Anne, B.A Charlotte 

Hall, Mary Rose, B.A Kannapolis, Rt. 4 

Hamilton, Eleanor, B.S.H.E Richlands 

Hamlin, Betty, B.S.H.E Milo, Maine 

Hampton, Lucille, B.S.H.E Rutherfordton, Rt. 3 

Hancock, Doris, B.S.S.A Siler City 



252 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hanna, Jean Ann, B.F.A Charlotte 

Hannah, Lucille, B.S.P.E Franklin, Rt 1 

Hanson, Mary Lou, B.S.S.A Southport 

Harbinson, Martha, B.A Lexington 

Harding, Margie, B.A Pilot Mountain 

Hardy, Lillian, B.A LaGrange, Rt. 1 

Harmon, Geralyn, B.A , Gastonia 

Harmon, Mary, B.A Savannah, Ga. 

Harrelson, Christine, B.A Cherryville, Rt. 1 

Harrelson, Margaret, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain, Rt. 2 

Harrill, Doris, B.S.H.E Forest City 

Harrington, Betty Grey, B.S.P.E Danville, Va. 

Harrington, Katharine Lou, B.S.H.E Sanford, Rt. 2 

Harris, Barbara, B.S.M Salisbury 

Harris, Jean, B.A Durham 

Harris, Mary Agnes, B.A Charlotte 

Harris, Patricia, B.S.M Kings Mountain 

Harris, Tommy, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Harrison, Jean, B.A Wilson 

Harrison, Patricia, B.A Eagle Springs 

Harutunian, Eleanor, B.S.S.A Tehran, Iran 

Hayes, Martha, B.S.H.E Elkin, Rt. 2 

Hayter, Ann, B.S.P.E Abingdon, Va., Rt. 1 

Haywood, Tommie, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Hedgecock, Dolly, B.S.S.A High Point, Rt. 1 

Henderson, Anne, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Hendrix, Doris, B.A Greensboro 

Henneberger, Sara, B.S.S.A Troy 

Hepler, Betty Jean, B.S.H.E Thomasville, Rt. 3 

Hermann, Marcia, B.A Camden, N. J. 

Highfill, Edith, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 7 

Hildebrand, Katherine, B.A Asheville 

Hill, Virginia, B.A Kinston 

Hirsch, Eleanor, B.A Woodmere, N. Y. 

Hockett, Patricia, B.F.A Greensboro 

Hodges, Janet, B.A Oteen 

Hofler, Hasseltine, B.S.N Gatesville 

Hogan, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Chapel Hill, Rt. 2 

Hollifield, Louise, B.S.P.E Spruce Pine, Rt. 1 

Holly, Elaine, B.A Davidson 

Holm, Catherine, B.A Cassadaga, Fla. 

Holshouser, Mary, B.A Blowing Rock 

Hook, Willodene, B.S.P.E Bessemer City 

Hooks, Susan Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Fremont 

Hoskins, Eleanor, B.S.S.A Summerfield 

Hough, Jane, B.S.H.E Washington, D. C. 

Howard, Norma, B.A Raleigh 



Student List 253 

Howe, Joyce, B.S.M Springfield, Mass. 

Howell, Nancy, B.A Candler 

Hudson, Catherine, B.S.H.E Andrews 

Huffines, Doris, B.S.M Lenoir 

Hufham, Betty, B.F.A Clinton 

Hughes, Ann O'Neil, B.S.S.A Winston- Salem 

Hughes, Ellen, B.S.H.E Durham 

Hughes, Mary Lee, B.A Kinston, Rt. 2 

Hunley, Norma, B.A Rocky Mount 

Hunnicutt, Jeanne, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Hunt, Clara Gray, B.S.H.E Thomasville, Rt. 2 

Hunt, Frances, B.S.H.E Pleasant Garden 

Hurlocker, Martha, B.S.M Albemarle, Rt. 3 

Idol, Mary, B.A Pleasant Garden 

Ingle, Carolyn, B.A Boone 

Ingram, Virginia Rae, B.F.A Taylorsville 

Jackson, Henrietta, B.S.S.A Robbins 

Jacobsen, Barbara, B.A Charlotte 

Jahn, Grace, B.A Morganton 

James, Mazie, B.A Charlotte 

Jernigan, Jacqueline, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Jobe, Barbara, B.F.A Raleigh 

Johnson, Ann T., B.A Albemarle 

Johnson, Betty, B.A Benson 

Johnson, Dorothy, B.S.N Raleigh 

Johnson, Frances, B.A Chalybeate Springs 

Johnson, Jacqueline, B.A Raleigh, Rt. 3 

Johnson, Joyce, B.S.P.E Smithfield, Rt. 1 

Johnson, La Rue, B.S.S.A Randleman, Rt. 1 

Johnson, Miralyn, B.A Ashley Heights 

Johnson, Phyllis, B.A Belvidere, 111. 

Johnson, Susanna, B.A Burgaw 

Johnston, Joann, B.A Mooresville 

Johnston, Peggy, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Jones, Ann, B.S.P.E Garner 

Jones, Gean, B.A Whiteville 

Jones, Margueritte, B.A Hendersonville 

Jones, Roberta, B.A Charlotte 

Jordan, Barbara, B.A Hartford, Conn. 

Jordan, Juanita, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, Rt. 7 

Joyner, Lillian, B.S.H.E Vanceboro, Rt. 1 

Judy, Laura, B.A Boone 

Julian, Martha, B.S.S.A Franklinville, Rt. 1 

Kahn, Rose, B.A Baltimore, Md. 

Kelley, Ruth Ann, B.A New Canaan, Conn., Rt. 3 



254 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Kent, Barbara, B.A Greensboro 

Key, Polly, B.S.S.A Bobbins 

Kimbrough, Susan, B.A Richmond, Va. 

Kinard, Callie Marie, B.S.H.E Wenona 

Kinard, Elizabeth, B.A Randallstown, Md. 

King, Irvin, B.A Pelham, Rt. 1 

King, Marie, B.A Pelham, Rt. 1 

Kinsland, Lucille, B.S.H.E Franklin, Rt. 4 

Kirkman, Jane, B.S.M Pleasant Garden 

Kirschner, Kathryn, B.A York, Pa. 

Kloster, Louise, B.A Mahwah, N. J. 

Lail, Martha Abernathy, B.S.P.E Hickory 

Lamy, Rebecca, B.A Jacksonville 

Langdon, Rebecca, B.A Benson 

Lassiter, Betty Hooks, B.A Four Oaks, Rt. 3 

Laughinghouse, Lucile, B.A Greenville 

Lawless, Ann, B.S.N Charlotte 

Lawrence, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Eure 

Lawrence, Evelyn, B.A Falkland 

Laws, Wanna Faye, B.A Thomasville 

Lazenby, Martha, B.S.H.E Fayetteville 

Leatherwood, Frances, B.S.H.E Waynesville, Rt. 2 

Lee, Nell, B.A Wilmington 

Leece, Elizabeth, B.A Tazewell, Va. 

Leigh, Florence, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Lemon, Joan, B.A Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Lemons, Joyce, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Lentz, Anne, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Levin, Sharon, B.A Anderson, S. C. 

Lilley, Mary Ola, B.S.H.E Williamston, Rt. 1 

Link, Christine, B.S.P.E Brevard 

Linville, Helen, B.A Oak Ridge 

Lippard, Martha, B.S.S.A Albemarle, Rt. 3 

Lohr, Martha, B.A Lumberton 

Long, Lois, B.A Virgilina, Va. 

Lovett, Mary Moore, B.A Asheboro 

Lowery, Carol, B.A Lowell 

Lowry, Jo Ann, B.A Lowell 

Lyon, Shirley, B.A Greensboro 

McCarty, Eugenia, B.S.M Wilmington 

McComb, Dian, B.A Portsmouth, Va. 

McCorkle, Dorothy, B.A Lenoir, Rt. 1 

McCullen, Mary, B.A Clinton 

MacDonald, Esther, B.F.A Newport News, Va. 

Mclnnis, Elizabeth, B.A Pleasant Garden 

Mclnnis, Maxine, B.A Pinebluff 



Student List 255 

McJunkins, Jane, B.A Badin 

McKnight, Betty, B.A Morganton 

McLean, Caroline, B.S.H.E Mebane 

McLeod, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Rowland 

McLeod, Nina, B.S.S.A Robbins 

McMillan, Jimmie Sue, B.A Chadbourn 

McNeill, Mary Claire, B.S.S.A Laurinburg 

McReynolds, Betty Will, B.A Winston- Salem 

Madison, Louise, B.F.A Webster 

Malloy, Nan, B.A Laurinburg 

Mann, Peggy, B.S.S.A Clyde 

Mann, Sarah, B.S.S.A Pittsboro, Rt. 1 

Maples, Nancy, B.S.P.E Rocky Mount 

Marlette, Anne, B.S.H.E High Point 

Marston, Hilda, B.F.A Scotland Neck 

Masengill, Sara Lou, B.A Johnson City, Tenn. 

Matthews, Hazel, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

May, Martha, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Maynard, Martha, B.F.A Winston- Salem 

Maynard, Peggy, B.S.H.E Star 

Medford, Nancy, B.A Clyde 

Medlin, Dorothy, B.A Oteen 

Medlin, Martha Ann, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Rt. 6 

Merrill, Barbara, B.A Westfield, N. J. 

Michalove, Doris, B.A Asheville 

Micol, Emily, B.S.S.A Valdese 

Miller, Doris, B.A Spencer 

Miller, Frances, B.A Winston-Salem 

Miller, Kathryn, B.A Asheville 

Miller, Ramona, B.A Greensboro 

Mills, Patty, B.A Winston-Salem 

Mitchell, Nancy, B.A Lewes, Del. 

Monk, Gloria, B.A Winston-Salem 

Monsour, Jeanette, B.S.M Fayetteville 

Moody, Frances, B.A Sanf ord 

Moon, Betty Blue, B.F.A Graham 

Moon, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Graham 

Mooney, Louise, B.A Greenville, Tenn., Rt. 5 

Moore, Carolyn, B.A Lenoir, Rt. 5 

Moore, Eva Kate, B.A Hurdle Mills, Rt. 2 

Moore, L. Jane, B.S.H.E Ahoskie, Rt. 4 

Moore, Marjorie, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Moore, Nancy, B.A Greensboro 

Morgan, Fay, B.A Pinehurst 

Morrell, Patricia, B.A Asheville, Rt. 3 

Morris, Barbara Anne, B.S.P.E Salisbury 



256 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Morrissette, Marilyn, B.S.M Raleigh 

Morton, Joyce, B.A Raleigh 

Moser, Dollie, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 3 

Mundy, Josephine, B.A Morganton 

Murchison, Janice, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Myers, Mary Louise, B.S.H.E Greenville, S. C. 

Myrick, Betsy Ann, B.S.P.E Littleton 

Nardin, Edith, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Neece, Carolyn, B.S.M Elizabeth City 

Neighbors, Joan, B.S.M Benson 

Nelson, Helen, B.A Goldsboro 

Newitt, Mildred, B.A Charlotte 

Newlin, Marianna, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Nichols, Jessie Gray, B.S.S.A Efland 

Norman, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Norris, Dolores, B.A Tabor City, Rt. 1 

Nunez, Nancy, B.A Catonsville, Md. 

O'Berry, Jane, B.S.H.E Evergreen 

Oden, Sara, B.A Washington 

O'Donnell, Katherine, B.A Barnardsville 

O'Ferrell, Iris, B.A Greensboro 

Okey, Eugenia, B.F.A Graham 

Oliver, Virginia, B.S.H.E Carthage, Rt. 3 

Orr, Jonnie Mae, B.S.M Hendersonville 

Orrell, Mildred, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Overby, Marion, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Owen, Juda, B.A Lake Toxaway 

Pace, Lois Ray, B.A Bailey, Rt. 2 

Page, Lucy, B.S.S.A Andrews 

Palmer, Frances, B.S.H^E Charlotte 

Pappas, Thalia, B.A Charlotte 

Paris, Miriam, B.A Winston-Salem 

Parker, M. Elisabeth, B.A Whiteville 

Parker, Kathryn, B.A Clinton 

Parrish, Alberta, B.S.H.E Burnsville 

Parrish, Margaret, B.A Burnsville 

Patterson, Mildred, B.A Broadway, Rt. 1 

Patterson, Raedelle, B.A White Plains 

Patterson, Ruth Henry, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Payne, Ruby Ann, B.A Wilmington 

Pearl, Betty, B.A Greensboro 

Pearson, Mildred, B.A Elizabeth City 

Peele, Alice, B.A Oxford 

Pegram, Jane, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Pegram, Virginia, B.S.S.A Stokesdale, Rt. 2 



Student List 257 

Pender, Ann, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Pendergrass, Barbara, B.A Cliffside 

Pendleton, Ethel, B.A Wilmington 

Petrea, Betty Jo, B.S.H.E Kannapolis, Rt. 4 

Petrea, Margaret, B.S.H.E Salisbury, Rt. 6 

Pharr, Joan, B.A Charlotte 

Phillips, Jean, B.S.P.E Salisbury 

Phillips, Mary Joanna, B.A Rockingham 

Phillips, Mildred, B.A Hickory 

Phillips, Peggy, B.A Southern Pines 

Pickard, Louise, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Pickle, Peggy Sue, B.S.H.E Lexington, Rt. 4 

Pierce, Ruth, B.S.H.E Cary 

Pillatt, Lucille, B.S.H.E Savannah, Ga. 

Pinchback, Jean, B.A Greensboro 

Pittman, Dora, B.A Lumberton, Rt. 2 

Plaut, Dorothy, B.A Brevard 

Pollander, Marianne, B.A Durham 

Pollard, Ann Carter, B.A Winston-Salem 

Pons, Imogene, B.A Valdese 

Pope, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Mount Olive 

Poplin, Elizabeth, B.A Wilmington 

Poteat, June, B.S.N Yanceyville 

Potts, Bobbie Lee, B.S.H.E Winston- Salem, Rt. 2 

Powell, Ramona, B.A Enfield, R. 1 

Pressly, Margaret, B.A Arden 

Preston, Anne, B.A Fayetteville 

Price, Ina Mae, B.A Spindale 

Putnam, Peggy, B.S.H.E Cherry Point 

Quails, Martha, B.S.M Boone 

Quinn, Faye, B.S.S.A Beulaville 

Rainey, June, B.A Salisbury 

Ramsay, Joan, B.F.A Bloomfield, N. J. 

Randall, Betty, B.S.M Baltimore, Md. 

Raney, Patricia, B.A Midway Park 

Rau, Rodgeryn, B.A Winston-Salem 

Rawlins, Ruth, B.A New Bern 

Reavis, Antoinette, B.A Henderson, Rt. 3 

Redwine, Jane, B.S.S.A Albemarle, Rt. 2 

Reeves, Lora Jean, B.S.S.A Walnut 

Rendleman, Eleanor, B.A Salisbury 

Rhinehart, Mildred, B.A Clyde 

Richardson, Betsy, B.A Elkin 

Rickert, Ellen, B.A Statesville, Rt. 5 

Ridenhour, Ann Marie, B.A Winston- Salem 



258 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Ridenhour, E. Ann, B.S.H.E Cooleemee 

Ridgeway, Phyllis, B.S.S.A Roanoke Rapids 

Riesman, Roberta, B.A Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Ritnour, Diane, B.A Washington, D. C. 

Roberts, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Durham 

Roberts, Joan, B.A Leaksville, Rt. 1 

Roberts, Ruth, B.S.H.E Barnard 

Robinson, Katherine, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Rockwell, Judith, B.S.N High Point 

Rogers, Betty, B.S.S.A Albemarle 

Rogers, Carol, B.A Albemarle 

Ross, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Pleasant Garden 

Rotha, Jean, B.S.H.E Hendersonville 

Rothman, Sally, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Rothrock, Nancy Rae, B.A Thomasville 

Rouse, Anne, B.A , Dunn 

Russell, Anne, B.A Winston-Salem 

Ryder, Margaret, B.S.H.E Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sanderford, Everette, B.S.H.E Cary 

Sanders, Florence, B.S.S.A Rocky Point 

Sanders, Mary, B.A Tryon 

Sanderson, Susan, B.A Washington 

Sarbaugh, Rachel, B.A Lumberton 

Sarsfield, Jane, B.A Charlotte 

Saslow, Nancy, B.A Greensboro 

Satterfield, Lenore, B.A Atlanta, Ga. 

Satterthwaite, Jean, B.A Halifax, Rt. 2 

Saunders, June, B.A Draper 

Sawyer, Marie, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City, Rt. 3 

Scarboro, Martha, B.A Wendell, Rt. 2 

Scarborough, Mary, B.S.M Hookerton, Rt. 1 

Schaffer, Carole, B.A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Scott, Dorothy, B.A Washington 

Scott, Leona, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Sedberry, Charlotte, B.A Leaksville 

Sedgwick, Olive Ruth, B.A Elizabeth City 

Shamel, Dorothy, B.A Winston-Salem 

Sharp, Eutha, B.A Harrelsville 

Sharpe, Betty, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 8 

Shaw, Amelia, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Shaw, Olive Ann, B.S.S.A Richlands, Rt. 2 

Shepherd, Ellen, B.A Harwood, Md. 

Sherrer, Norma, B.A Asheville 

Sherron, Betty, B.S.H.E Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Shiver, Dorothy, B.A Charlotte 

Shope, Dorothy, B.A. Asheville, Rt. 2 



Student List 259 

Shuford, Ellen, B.A Hickory 

Sides, Nancy, B.S.S.A Spencer 

Siler, Elizabeth R., B.A Asheville, Rt. 3 

Simmonds, Anne, B.A Johnson City, Tenn. 

Simon, Millicent, B.S.S.A Fairmont 

Simpson, Beverly, B.F.A Haw River 

Simpson, Carolyn, B.A Fayetteville 

Simpson, Helen, B.S.S.A New Bern, Rt. 2 

Simpson, Peggy, B.A New Bern 

Sink, Nancy, B.A Lexington 

Skinner, Marion, B.S.H.E. Lumberton 

Slater, Jean, B.A Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Small, Frances, B.A Tabor City, Rt. 2 

Small, Mary Bettie, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City, Rt. 1 

Smetana, Elaine, B.A Concord 

Smith, Carolyn D., B.S.H.E Andrews 

Smith, Frances, B.A Roaring Gap 

Smith, Janie, B.S.P.E Pikeville 

Smith, Lillian, B.A Lake Waccamau 

Smith, Lucy, B.S.N Mt. Airy, Rt. 1 

Smith, Margie, B.A Kinston 

Smith, Nancy Page, B.S.M Greensboro 

Smith, Patricia, B.A Fayetteville 

Smith, Shirley, B.S.S.A Kernersville 

Smith, Virginia A., B.A Monroe 

Smith, M. Virginia, B.A Mt. Olive 

Smothers, Rachel, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Snead, Ann, B.A Charlotte 

Snider, Priscilla, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Sorrentino, Mary, B.A Robbins 

Southerland, Anne, B.S.H.E South Mills 

Spake, Virginia, B.S.M Spencer 

Spencer, Jane, B.A Rocky Mount 

Spung, Sara, B.F.A Raleigh 

Stamey, Jean, B.A Perry Point, Md. 

Stanley, Marcelene, B.S.S.A Siler City 

Starritt, Marylou, B.A Johnson City, Tenn. 

Steele, Hazel, B.A Greensboro 

Steffan, Sophia, B.S.M High Point 

Stephenson, Lucy, B.A Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Stewart, Margaret, B.A Raleigh 

Stone, Jean, B.A Stoneville 

Straiton, Jeanne, B.A Charlotte 

Strickland, Bobbie Mae, B.S.P.E Smithfield 

Stryker, Joann, B.F.A Winston-Salem 

Suggs, Alice, B.S.H.E Gastonia 



260 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Sutton, Anne, B.S.H.E La Grange, Rt. 3 

Sutton, Margaret, B.A Pageland, S. C. 

Sweeney, Rosemary, B.A Wilmington 

Talley, Ruth, B.F.A Greensboro 

Taylor, Anne, B.A Elon College 

Taylor, Joan, B.A Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Taylor, Margaret, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Teague, Mildred, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Tegg, Shirley, B.S.M Norfolk, Va. 

Tenney, Sue, B.A Morehead City 

Tew, Barbara, B.S.S.A Garner 

Thomas, Geraldine, B.S.S.A Culberson, Rt. 1 

Thomas, Nancy, B.A Cameron 

Thompson, Jeanette, B.S.H.E Goldsboro, Rt. 5 

Thornburg, Charlotte, B.A Bessemer City 

Tillett, Jeannette, B.A Kill Devil Hills 

Tillman, Ruth, B.S.H.E Sanford, Rt. 3 

Tobias, Barbara, B.S.S.A High Point 

Tola, Mary Agnes, B.A Fayetteville 

Tolochko, Marilyn, B.A Kinston 

Trott, Mary, B.A Lenoir 

Troutman, Betty Jean, B.A Charlotte, Rt. 3 

Troxler, Rebecca, B.F.A Greensboro, Rt. 6 

Troy, Jane, B.A Wilmington 

Turner, Mary Alice, B.A Henderson, Rt. 2 

Turner, Sarah, B.A Mount Ulla 

Tweed, Carolyn, B.A Walnut 

Tyson, Adeline, B.A Monroe, Rt. 5 

Tyson, Ann, B.A Roseboro 

Underwood, Ruth, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Van Dyke, Virginia Mae, B.S.P.E Tazewell, Va. 

Van Hook, Betty Lou, B.A Henderson 

Vaughn, Mary Lou, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Vaughn, Peggy, B.A Hickory 

Venters, Anne, B.S.P.E Trenton 

Verreault, Malvina, B.A Valdese 

Wagoner, Patsy Anne, B.A Greensboro 

Walker, Edith G., B.A Leaksville 

Walker, Jane, B.A Greensboro, Rt. 2 

Walker, Rose Marie, B.S.M Columbus, Ga. 

Wall, Barbara, B.S.N Mount Airy 

Walls, Mary Olive, B.S.M Guntersville, Ala. 

Ward, Freda, B.S.S.A Salisbury, Rt. 2 

Ward, Mary Ann, B.S.H.E Goldsboro 



Student List 261 

Warlick, Carol, B.S.M Lawndale, Rt. 3 

Warren, Patricia, B.A Winston- Salem 

Waterman, Regena Lee, B.A Tampa, Fla. 

Watkins, Maysie, B.A Wilmington 

Weathers, Marianne, B.S.P.E Shelby 

Webster, Betty Sue, B.A Haw River, Rt. 1 

Weisner, Colista, B.S.P.E Olin 

Wells, Frances, B.A Hampstead 

Welsh, Joy Benton, B.A Monroe 

Wessman, Mary Jane, B.A Wilson 

Wheeler, Winnifred, B.A Baltimore, Md. 

Wheeless, Jewel, B.A Rocky Mount 

Whisonant, Jean, B.S.H.E Gastonia 

Whitaker, Claudine, B.A Kannapolis 

Whitaker, Jacqueline, B.A Hillsboro 

White, Joan, B.S.P.E York, Pa. 

White, Pauline, B.F.A Greensboro 

White, Sara, B.A Cornelius 

Whitley, Miriam, B.A Albemarle 

Whittington, Anne, B.A Charlotte 

Wicker, Joann, B.S.M Lumberton 

Wickman, Joan, B.A New York, N. Y. 

Wilkins, Sarah, B.A Wytheville, Va. 

Williams, Catherine, B.A Winston-Salem 

Williams, Emily, B.S.S.A Siler City 

Williams, Jean E., B.A New Bern 

Williams, Joscelyn, B.A Asheville 

Williams, Leone, B.S.S.A Graham 

Williams, Nancy Ruth, B.A. Wilkesboro 

Willis, Mary Jo, B.S.H.E Lawndale, Rt. 1 

Willoughby, Yvonne, B.A Ahoskie 

Wilson, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Windley, Katherine, B.F.A Henderson 

Winfield, Elizabeth, B.A Washington 

Wood, Almetrice, B.A Wilson's Mills 

Wood, Marguerite, B.S.M. St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Wrenn, Elizabeth, B.A Springfield, Pa. 

Wyche, Sara, B.A Henderson 

Yancey, Rose Marie, B.A Garner, Rt. 1 

Young, Iris, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Young, Jean, B.A Princeton 

Zeman, Anne, B.A Charlotte 



262 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COMMERCIAL STUDENTS 

Adams, Nancy Sue Salisbury, Rt. 1 

Adams, Patricia Ann Charlotte 

Allen, Vergie T Roxboro 

Baity, Virginia Lee Winston-Salem 

Blackwood, Edith Geraldine Guilford 

Boaz, Ramona Mae Thomasville 

Boyd, Margaret Anne Brevard 

Bracy, Georgia Belvedere Rocky Mount 

Bradley, Sue Frances Forest City 

Braswell, Jean Grey Concord 

Brown, Julia C Graham 

Cassell, Mary Lee Mt. Airy, Rt. 2 

Cobb, Beverly Lovell Gibsonville, Rt. 1 

Cobb, Mary Doris Gibsonville, Rt. 1 

Cole, Patsy Ann Carolina Beach 

Coppley, Alice Elizabeth Lexington, Rt. 6 

Courtney, Mary Anna Whiteville 

Cox, Anna Lou Spray 

Cox, Dorothy Jane Spray 

Cox, Emily Jean Greensboro 

Cox, Jane Marie Asheboro 

Dark, Emma Jean Siler City 

DeVault, Billie Ray Asheville 

Dickens, Diana Ruth Thomasville 

Dixon, Ann Elizabeth Henderson 

Donathan, Jessie Lee Colfax 

Dross, Bessie Koula Charlotte 

Edwards, Evelyn Jean Greensboro 

Ellington, Patricia Jane Charlotte 

Emory, Marilyn Ann Greensboro 

Ensley, Mary Martha Clyde 

Felts, Iris Lea Norlina, Rt. 2 

Frazier, Janet Forester Fuquay Springs 

Funk, Kathryn Lois Gastonia 

Garner, Mary Adeline Newport, Rt. 2 

Gay, Margaret Jane Williamston 

Gerringer, Marion Talmage Greensboro 

Goff, Nancy E Greensboro 

Gray, Rebecca Jane Kernersville, Rt. 2 

Green, Carolyn Huntington Charlotte 

Griffin, Margaret Elizabeth Woodland 

Gunn, Bettiejane W Reidsville, Rt. 4 



Student List 263 

Hancock, Jill Leaksville 

Harris, Mary R Siler City 

Hayes, Miriam Joyce Norlina, Rt. 1 

Hendrickson, Donna Joan Charlotte 

Hensley, Betty Wray Burnsville 

Hodges, Claire Estelle Gastonia 

Hoffman, Laura Crowell Lincolnton 

Hopkins, Joanna Charlotte 

Howard, Betty Jean Concord 

Howe, Betty Ann Raleigh 

Howell, Martha Hamlet 

Howell, Mary Hamlet 

Huf ham, Dorothy Glenn Wilmington 

Hutchens, Ruby Marie Mebane 

Ivey, Mary Carol Graham 

Johnson, Blanche Ann Greensboro 

Jones, Addie Colleen Leaksville 

Kesler, Bonnie Lou Winston- Salem 

Kesler, Nancy Elizabeth Lincolnton 

Keisewetter, Barbara Antonia Greensboro 

King, Anne Lee Greensboro 

Kluttz, Dorothy Louise Concord 

Knight, Phyllis Ann Stokesdale, Rt. 1 

Langdon, Joyce Ann Benson, Rt. 2 

Lee, Shirley Lou Smithfield 

Leggette, Mary Delia Enfield, Rt. 1 

McKinnon, Sarah Frances Laurinburg 

McLean, Billie Sue Lexington 

McMillan, Bonnie Sue Sparta 

McMillan, Claudia Greensboro 

McQueen, Betty Lee Albemarle 

Martin, Mildred Louise Mayodan 

Michael, Evelyn Ramseur Charlotte 

Mock, Margaret Frances Winston-Salem 

Moore, Margaret Mae Benson, Rt. 1 

Murad, Dolores Ann Wilson 

Murphy, Ann Helen Greensboro 

Nau, Helen Ida Norlina, Rt. 2 

Norrell, Nancy Nina Winston-Salem 

Pearman, Frances Anne Greensboro 

Piner, Grace Reel Morehead City 

Powell, Bettie Lou Whiteville 

Pue, Leslie Gray Greensboro 



264 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Rabil, Agnes Marie Wagram 

Redmon, Mary Frances Leaksville 

Ritchie, Jean S Concord 

Robinson, Margaret Glenn Canton 

Rogers, Frances Anne Roxboro, Rt. 3 

Rumley, Jewell Frances Greensboro 

Saleeby, Lillian Grace Wilmington 

Saleeby, Samera Mary Wilson 

Sammons, Evelyn Hunter Wise 

Satterfield, Edelle Pierce Hallsboro 

Sevier, Wyona Maxine Concord 

Siegmund, Dorothy Elizabeth Greensboro 

Simpson, Jacquelyn Beatrice Jacksonville 

Smith, Agnes Kathryn Lillington 

Smith, Bette June Greensboro, Rt. 7 

Smith, Mary Christine Kernersville, Rt. 1 

Smith, Rebecca Tyndale Mebane 

Snyder, Betty Ann Canton 

Southall, Annie Maude Inez 

Spillman, Barbara Jeanne Elizabethtown 

Stout, Polly Marie Ramseur, Rt. 1 

Stovall, Ruth Virginia Winston-Salem 

Swiggett, Nancy Gray Pomona 

Taylor, Anna Ruth Thomasville 

Thompson, Jerrie Earlene Rocky Mount 

Trent, Jean Gwyn Reidsville, Rt. 2 

Tucker, Mary Evelyn Concord, Rt. 3 

Wagoner, Betty Jean Gold Hill, Rt. 2 

Waitman, Nancy Lou Lexington 

Walker, Edith Inez Burlington, Rt. 3 

Wallace, Anna Sue Jacksonville 

Ward, Clara Dolores Mount Holly 

Welch, Dorothy Jean Mt. Airy, Rt. 1 

Welch, Mary Catherine Greensboro 

Wentz, Helen Josephine Rockingham 

White, Hilda Gray Greensboro 

White, Alice Vivian Fayetteville 

Williams, Virginia Muriel Hallsboro 

Willis, Elizabeth Cornelia Beaufort 

Wilson, Dolly Faye Roxboro, Rt. 3 

Winchester, Vera King Monroe 

Wolfe, Edna Earle Mount Olive 

Wrenn, Barbara Ann Greensboro 



Student List 265 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Bostian, Catherine G High Point 

Eller, Daphne Stoneville 

Finch, Margaret Goode Chase City, Va. 

Giles, Mary Angelyn Greensboro 

Hunter, Allene Wall Guilford College 

James, Jeannie H Greenville, S. C. 

Keller, Mozelle High Point, Rt. 4 

Krahnke, Gwendolyn Leland 

Lucas, Laura Louise Lucama 

Sherrill, Sarah Mt. Ulla 

Shine, Ruth R Goldsboro 

Smith, M. Ruth Shelby, Rt .1 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Allen, Marietta Greensboro 

Anderton, Laura Providence, R. I. 

Bodie, Winifred Troy 

Bohannon, Eloise Greensboro, Rt. 3 

Brown, Jean High Point 

Carruthers, Patricia Greensboro 

Chace, Pastora New York,N. Y. 

Chase, Elizabeth (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Church, Jean D New Bern 

Cole, Katherine S Greensboro 

Cone, Barbara S Greensboro 

Cousins, Hazel L Greensboro 

Cox, Norma Hollingsworth High Point 

Creed, Louise Greensboro 

Dalrymple, Ruth Greensboro 

Davidson, Elsie Graham Greensboro 

Davis, Patricia C Greensboro 

Deskins, Julia Greensboro 

Deyton, Susan Spruce Pine 

Dickieson, Anna Bell Greensboro 

Friddle, Kay Greensboro 

Friedlaender, Stephen Greensboro 

Garrard, Gertrude P Greensboro 

Garvin, Eoline Greensboro 

Geiger, Elizabeth Greensboro 



266 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hadaway, Dolores Greensboro 

Hardin, Noma Greensboro 

Heptinstall, Mildred A Greensboro 

Hobbs, Mary Jane Greensboro 

Hodgin, Emma Jean Greensboro 

Hodgkin, Kathryn E Greensboro 

Homewood, Frances Greensboro 

Hooker, Betty Greensboro 

Hunt, Ligia Greensboro 

Jackson, Lenora W Greensboro 

Jennings, Dorothy Greensboro 

Jupp, Tulla Greensboro 

Kimmel, Jane Greensboro 

Kimmich, Gertrude Greensboro 

Klein, Minnie M Greensboro 

Kulp, Alice Varner Greensboro 

LaRochelle, Augustine Greensboro 

LeBauer, Joseph Greensboro 

Lee, Catherine H Greensboro 

Lemonds, Marjorie Greensboro 

Little, Laura Grace Greensboro 

McFalls, Vernon Greensboro 

McKenzie, Betty Rockingham 

Maxwell, Louise H Greensboro 

Miller, Janette Greensboro 

Moore, Mary Louise Madison 

Morgan, Mary Etta Charlotte 

Neese, Gertrude Greensboro 

Newlin, Lucile Freeman Randleman 

Oakley, Betty Greensboro 

Overman, Bernice Greensboro 

Owens, Patsy Greensboro 

Painter, Elizabeth L Greensboro 

Pannill, Florence Greensboro 

Patterson, Gleaves Greensboro 

Pease, Nancy Springfield, Mass. 

Phillips, Carolyn Greensboro 

Phillips, Mary Ann Greensboro 

Pickard, Joy Greensboro 

Platter, Nancy Lee Greensboro 

Register, Tobey L Greensboro 

Rochelle, Louise P Greensboro, Rt. 3 



Student List 267 

Rogers, Thelma Greensboro 

Rose, Phyllis Lila Greensboro 

Smith, Ruby Bass Greensboro 

Snoddy, Annabelle Candor 

Soles, Myrtle Greensboro 

Stern, Katherine Greensboro 

Stoker, Carroll Greensboro 

Terry, Alice Lee Raleigh 

Thomas, Martha G Greensboro 

Walters, Carolyn Greensboro, Rt. 3 

Williard, Ruth High Point 

Wolfe, Lucy State Road 

Yow, Frances Greensboro 

Yow, Martie Greensboro 



SUMMER SESSION— 1948 

Abdalla, Mary Louise Selma 

Abell, Sheffield Horace Yanceyville 

Abernethy, Sara All (Mrs.) New Bern 

Adams, Laura Elizabeth Greensboro 

Adams, Paul Lieber Guilford College 

Albright, Joseph L Greensboro 

Alexander, Ann Gaugin (Mrs.) Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Alexander, Dorothy McCulloch (Mrs.) Pleasant Garden 

Allen, Elizabeth Lassiter (Mrs.) Pollocksville 

Allen, Eve-Anne Pollocksville 

Allen, Marietta S. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Allen, Minnie Lou Polkton 

Allen, Rebecca Pruitt Mount Airy 

Alligood, Gladys (Mrs.) Washington, N. C. 

Altvater, Amelia C. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Ambrose, Stella J. (Mrs.) Hickory 

Anderson, R. Alease Perdue (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Anderson, Marion Joyce Shallotte 

Anderson, Sara Elizabeth Leaksville 

Andrews, Eula Lee Beal (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Andrews, Nell Matheson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Angel, Lymond E Reidsville 

Anthony, Annie B Patrick Springs, Va. 

Apperson, Anne Mocksville 

Armfield, Irene Mount Airy 

Arvin, Iva Bruce (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Austin, Charlotte W. (Mrs.) Matthews 

Austin, ,Katherine Leaksville 



268 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Austin, Louise D Albemarle 

Averett, Edna Earl Oxford 

Avery, Lotus V Plumtree 

Aycock, Ivor Fremont 

Ayers, Cornelia Rowland 

Ayers, Lucille Ruth McCormack (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Ayers, Virginia Louise Fayetteville 

Bailey, Vertie Rayburn (Mrs.) Cramerton 

Baldwin, Dorothy E Fletcher 

Baldwin, Mary W Sanford 

Ballard, Lacy Henry Randleman 

Balsley, Frances Taylor Reidsville 

Barber, Rosemary Atlanta, Ga. 

Barlow, Mellie Hill Wilmington 

Barlowe, Margaret » Lenoir 

Barnes, Jean Currie (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Barnett, Margaret P. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Barrier, John F Winston-Salem 

Barrier, Verney Meeler (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Barrington, Patricia P. (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Barrington, Ruth R. (Mrs.) 4 Lumberton 

Bartis, Nick James Greensboro 

Bass, Jane Anne Spring Hope 

Bateman, Jesse B., Jr Greensboro 

Baucom, Barbara Lee Apex 

Beall, Lawrence L., Jr Greensboro 

Beaman, Oliver James Greensboro 

Beck, Frances E Greensboro 

Bedell, Mayebelle Woodbine, Ga. 

Beeson, Jewell Sophia 

Bennett, John S Greensboro 

Bennett, Martha Morton (Mrs.) Wilmington 

Bennett, Maude D Bakersville 

Benson, Edith Okes (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Bertholf, Virginia Rae Morris Plains, N. J. 

Bingham, Lena (Mrs.) Randleman 

Bird, Charles D Greensboro 

Black, Imogene (Mrs.) Thomasville 

Black, Martha Whitworth (Mrs.) Wake Forest 

Blackman, Ruth Smithfield 

Blackwell, Emily Pine Hall 

Blevins, Mary Nance Dobson 

Blume, Mabel Rumple (Mrs.) Concord 

Boehret, Alice C Melrose Park, Pa. 

Bogart, Nancy B Greensboro 

Bogart, William H., Jr Greensboro 



Student List 269 

Boger, Sarah Estelle Concord 

Boggan, Mittie Isabel Pee Dee 

Boggs, Allie R. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Boggs, Virginia Easley, S. C. 

Bohannon, Eloise Mae Greensboro 

Bondurant, Joyce Davis (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Bondurant, Montine Draper 

Boone, T. Dorothy Charlotte 

Boone, Joanne Waynesville 

Boose, Glenn Mocksville 

Booth, Marguerite Cox (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Boren, Malcolm Matheson Greensboro 

Boss, Jeuel W Winston-Salem 

Bost, June High Point 

Bost, William Greensboro 

Bostian, Anne E Salisbury 

Bowles, Frances Winston-Salem 

Bowles, James A. (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Bowman, Annie T. (Mrs.) Julian 

Bowman, Betty L. (Mrs.) Elon College 

Bowman, Bulow Wilson Charlotte 

Boyd, Nancy Greensboro 

Bradford, Betty Jane Davidson 

Bradley, Dorothy Forest City 

Brady, May Parsons (Mrs.) Roanoke, Va. 

Brantley, Mary E St. Louis, Mo. 

Brantley, Willie Belle St. Louis, Mo. 

Braswell, Sarah Marshville 

Bray, Carol Boonville 

Bray, Mabel Moore (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Bright, Edna Waynesville 

Brinkley, Doris Charlotte 

Brinkley, E. Lois Leonard (Mrs.) Welcome 

Brintnall, Lucille Farmer (Mrs.) Bryson City 

Brock, Sarah Lee Greensboro 

Brooks, Elizabeth Ann Greensboro 

Brooks, Rosalind N. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Broughton, Sallie Mitchiner (Mrs.) Garner 

Brower, Annie (Mrs. J. F.) Clemmons 

Brown, Barbara Edythe Raleigh 

Brown, Elizabeth Leicester 

Brown, Fredia Burnsville 

Brown, Gladys Mae Clyde 

Brown, Hope Janette Burnsville 

Brown, Jean High Point 

Brownlow, Willie Winston-Salem 



270 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Bruce, Annie E Orlanda, Fla. 

Brumbeloe, Margaret F. (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Bryan, Anna Cavenaugh (Mrs.) Dunn 

Bryan, Nellie Arnette Garner 

Bryan, Needham G Graham 

Bullard, Virginia Clemmons 

Bumgarner, Winnie Lucille Hickory 

Bumpass, Rosa B. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Bunn, Ishmael Worth Rural Hall 

Burnette, Ann Hatch Mount Olive 

Burris, Mary Major Anderson, S .C. 

Burrum, Rebecca Gallatin, Tenn. 

Burt, Nannie Ben Enfield 

Burton, Anne MacGlashan (Mrs.) Stoneville 

Burton, Irene Stephens (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Butler, Frances Ann Savannah, Ga. 

Butler, Gatsey Jane Goldsboro 

Butt, Paul A Bakersville 

Butters, Annabel B Wilmington 

Byerly, Ora Bennett (Mrs.) Bear Creek 

Cain, Eula Mae Fayetteville 

Cain, Robert B High Point 

Calton, Dorothy Louise Bostic 

Calvert, Sallie Jackson 

Cameron, Dorothy Jean Broadway 

Campbell, Frances Pinehurst 

Campbell, Louise Charles (Mrs.) Mocksville 

Canaday, Flora B Smithfield 

Cannon, Cecile Loris, S. C. 

Carlton, Annylu B. (Mrs. W. A.) Oxford, Ga. 

Carmichael, Dorothy Thaxton (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Carpenter, Joyce Whitfield (Mrs.) Gastonia 

Carr, Betty Jane Burlington 

Carrigan, Daisy P. (Mrs.) Burlington 

Carriker, Pearl Harrisburg 

Carter, Annette R Gatesville 

Carter, Ruth Henderson 

Caruthers, Virginia Elizabeth Graham 

Cash, Mary Belle (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Causey, Beverly Greensboro 

Causey, Edith A Liberty 

Causey, Lillie Fogleman (Mrs.) Liberty 

Causey, M. C. (Mrs.) Liberty 

Cecil, Betty Sue Greensboro 

Chandler, Annette Asheville 

Chandler, Coy (Mrs.) Franklinville 



Student List 271 

Chappell, Elizabeth Pasco Elizabeth City 

Chestnut, Iris Hood Dover 

Chilton, Huldah Marie Pleasant Garden 

Chipley, Ann Rocky Mount 

Chitty, Parthenia Louise Murfreesboro 

Choate, Janie Pineville 

Christian, Janie Greensboro 

Christy, Virginia Avondale 

Clapp, Cora M. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Clapp, Edna Robinson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Clark, Anna B Inez 

Clary, Wilburn Columbus Winston-Salem 

Clayton, Agnes Wariner (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Clegg, Mary Greensboro 

Clem, Kenneth S Burlington 

Click, Louise Woodleaf 

Clifford, Rachel M Dunn 

Clifton, Ellen Faison 

Glontz, Winton Monroe 

Cobb, Annie Lois Gibsonville 

Coble, Belle Elliott (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Coble, Marie H. Smith (Mrs.) Wake Forest 

Coble, Myrtle Nicholson (Mrs. Chas. B., Sr.) Burlington 

Coe, Verta L. Idol (Mrs.) High Point 

Cohen, Lawrence Martin Greensboro 

Coker, Evangeline Garysburg 

Cole, Mary Wheeler (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Coleman, Anne Reidsville 

Coleman, Faye Thompson (Mrs.) Black Creek 

Coleman, Frances Carter (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Coley, Faye High Point 

Colmer, Marjorie Cartland (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Comer, Ruth Gibson (Mrs.) Dobson 

Connolly, Barbara E Reidsville 

Connor, Mary Wells Greensboro 

Conrad, Jonnie Lee Greensboro 

Conrad, Stephen George Greensboro 

Cook, Flossie Brewer (Mrs.) Clemmons 

Cooke, Dan Boy Candler 

Cooke, Grace S. (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Cooper, Anne J. (Mrs. C. M., Jr.) Henderson 

Cooper, Elizabeth Anne Greensboro 

Cooper, Lucile Smoak (Mrs. Seaton) Greensboro 

Coppala, Peggy Charlotte 

Councilman, Mary Edith Bear Creek 

Counts, Faye Boone 



272 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Covington, Vela V Shelby 

Cowdery, Dorothy New York, N. Y. 

Cox, Eva Ann Mount Oilve 

Cox, Grace Caviness (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Cox, Linnie Dorsett (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Cox, Myrtle R Pleasant Garden 

Cranfill, Eva Yadkinville 

Crater, William M Greensboro 

Craver, Ava Lexington 

Craver, Viola James (Mrs. Harold) Lexington 

Crayton, Elizabeth (Mrs.) Oakboro 

Crook, Mary Carolyn Albemarle 

Crumpler, Mary Fisher Roseboro 

Culberson, Gladys H. (Mrs.) Tryon 

Cunningham, Charles Decatur, Jr Greensboro 

Currence, Robert F Greensboro 

Cushman, Grace E High Point 

Cuthrell, Mary O. Ellington (Mrs.) Rocky Mount 

Dallas, Bessie T. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Dallas, Mollie Alcon (Mrs. J. S.) Leaksville 

Daughtry, Annie Belle Roanoke Rapids 

Davenport, Edna Greenville 

Davis, Annie Z. (Mrs. R. W.) Blanch 

Davis, Barbara Anne Yadkinville 

Davis, Frances Cary Durham 

Davis, Emma Irene Yarnall (Mrs.) High Point 

Davis, Joyce Sutherland (Mrs.) Boone 

Davis, Laura Duncan Beaufort 

Davis, Paula Goldsboro 

Davis, Ruth Ivey (Mrs.) Beaufort 

Davis, Vivian Beck (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Dawson, Joseph LeRoy Pleasant Garden 

Deans, Helen Greensboro 

Deans, Kathleen Greensboro 

Debnam, Winifred Barwick (Mrs.) Roanoke Rapids 

DeBruhl, Nina Eugenia Asheville 

Dees, Joan Bayboro 

Delancey, Frank, Jr Greensboro 

Del Grande, Charlie L. Washington (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

DeLoach, Edna D. (Mrs.) Pleasant Garden 

Dempsey, Lois Hixson (Mrs.) Candler 

Denny, Flossie Greensboro 

Derrickson, Kathryn Bain (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Deskins, Julia Greensboro 

Deyton, Susan Spruce Pine 

Dickens, Patricia J Thomasville 



Student List 273 

Dillard, Stark Spottswood Greensboro 

Dixon, Sadie W. (Mrs.) Wake Forest 

Dixon, Virginia O Leasburg 

Dobbins, E. Marguerite Gastonia 

Dodson, Jerome Roger Greensboro 

Donald, Annie G. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Doub, Bessie Ernestine East Bend 

Doub, Mildred Elizabeth Tobaccoville 

Doughton, Ivy Grace Laurel Springs 

Doughton, Rosemond Sparta 

Douglas, Mary Jo Noble (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Dryden, M. Sallie Perkinson (Mrs.) Wise 

Ducker, Madelyn E. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Dudley, Helen M. Wall (Mrs.) Jonesville 

Duff, Mabel Patterson Milton 

Dunn, Emma L Wise 

Dwiggins, Charles Wade Jr Greensboro 

Dwyer, Doris Loretta iKannapolis 

Early, Abram Doyle Stokesdale 

Earp, Joe High Point 

Eason, Elizabeth Susan Tarboro 

Edens, Blanche Red Springs 

Edwards, Louise Thomasville 

Edwards, Miles O Walkertown 

Edwards, William Ralph Winston-Salem 

Egerton, Martha Washington, D. C. 

Eggleston, Mary E Winston-Salem 

Eidson, Mary Jane Mocksville 

Elder, Victoria A Palacios, Texas 

Ellen, Margaret Rocky Mount 

Elllington, Sankie Edwards (Mrs.) Siler City 

Elliott, Ruth Hertford 

Ellison, Aleta Griffin (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Emerson, Kathleen Winston-Salem 

Erwin, Carol Margaret Mount Ulla 

Eure, Blanche Eure 

Evans, Bonnybel Manteo 

Evans, Jean Winston-Salem 

Everett, Margaret McLendon Rockingham 

Ewert, Alta S St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Ewing, Mattie McKinney (Mrs.) Rockingham 

Farlowe, Mary Juanita Cole (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Farmer, Robert Lee Greensboro 

Felts, Carl Monroe King 

Ferguson, Mildred Beverly (Mrs.) Ahoskie 



274 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Ferguson, Nina Estelle Pittsboro 

Fetner, Vida Mauney (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Fields, Willard Davis (Mrs.) Pleasant Garden 

Finch, Elise Bailey 

Finch, Margaret Garvin (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Finch, Margaret Goode Chase City, Va. 

Fisher, Edward Greensboro 

Fisher, Laura Blanche Red Springs 

Fisher, Mary Gladys Granite Quarry 

Fitzpatrick, Dorothy College Park, Ga. 

Flack, Ann Forest City 

Forbes, Ann Newport News, Va. 

Ford, Mildred Seaboard 

Ford, Nancy B Washington, N. C 

Fordham, Barbara Byrd (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Forney, Anne Wesport, Conn. 

Foster, Hortense F Greensboro 

Foster, Myrtle M White Stone, S.C. 

Foster, Shirlie Hoffman (Mrs.) New Bern 

Foster, Robert William Greensboro 

Foust, Mamie Lee Andrew (Mrs.) Siler City 

Foust, Nina Tate (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Fowler, Frances Mount Airy 

Fowler, Hazel Patricia Durham 

Fowlkes, Doris Greensboro 

Fox, Alluwee Siler City 

Fox, Myrtle Dark (Mrs.) Liberty 

Foy, Grace Mount Airy 

Franck, Lydia Anne Fayetteville 

Franklin, Ann Charlotte 

French, Ruby Shearon (Mrs.) Draper 

Fry, Sarah J. Redfearn (Mrs.) Wadesboro 

Fryar, Clea McLeansville 

Fulk, George Allen Winston-Salem 

Fuller, Barbara Louise Greensboro 

Funk, Hazel Faye Gastonia 

Furman, DeLacy Foust (Mrs.) Liberty 

Gafford, Elma J. (Mrs.) Salisbury 

Gainey, Sarah A Fayetteville 

Gaither, Mittie Louise Winston-Salem 

Gallant, Evelyn Jane High Point 

Gardner, Eva Butler (Mrs.) Pomona 

Garner, Betsy Dolores Asheboro 

Garriss, Mabel Elizabeth Conway 

Gariss, Thelma A Margarettsville 

Garvin, Barbara Anne Spruce Pine 



Student List 275 

Garvin, Eoline Merchant Greensboro 

Gassaway, Emma H Honea Path, S. C. 

Gassaway, Ruby E Honea Path, S. C. 

Gaugler, Gloria Ridgewood, N. J. 

Gaulden, Terro O Greensboro 

Gay, Virginia English (Mrs.) Kinston 

Gibbs, Lucile Hemphill (Mrs.) Nebo 

Gibbs, Mary Ellen Guilford College 

Gibbs, Thomas Ray Clemmons 

Gibbs, Thomas Ray (Mrs.) Clemmons 

Gibbs, Margaret I. Greene (Mrs.) Rockingham 

Giles, Mary Angelyn Cottage Grove, Tenn 

Glisson, Anne Doris (Mrs.) Wilmington 

Godwin, Lena C. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Goldstein, Rita Greensboro 

Gonella, Miriam Franklinton 

Goodman, Margarette Langston (Mrs.) Elizabeth City 

Goodrich, Marion Sanford 

Gouge, Josie G Buladean 

Gouge, Margaret Ann Bakersville 

Graham, Joye Parnell (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Grant, Mary D. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Graves, Jane Crowell Mount Airy 

Gray, Mary Eleanor Lexington 

Gray, Robert L., Jr. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Gray, Ruby Randleman 

Gray, Susan R Pleasant Garden 

Gray, Virginia High Point 

Green, Alice Clark Clarkton 

Green, James C Greensboro 

Green, J. M. (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Green, Thelma Brown Franklinton 

Greene, Pearl M Bakersville 

Greene, Ruth Rebecca Orders (Mrs. David F., Jr.) Greensboro 

Greeson, Sallie R Gibsonville 

Gregg, Elizabeth McCabe (Mrs.) Norfolk, Va. 

Griffin, Carolyn W Elizabeth City 

Griffin, Mary Ellen Elizabeth City 

Griffin, Mary Hawley Sanford 

Griffin, Wilma Snow Camp 

Griffith, Alma B Relief 

Griffith, Park H Relief 

Griffith, Temple Reidsville 

Grimsley, Elizabeth Council 

Grissom, Beth Glenn Kittrell 

Grogan, Grace Valentine Stoneville 



276 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Grogan, Mozelle Culler (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Grose, Lois Franklinville 

Gulledge, Lucy Monroe 

Gunn, Bettijane Reidsville 

Gunn, Edna Reidsville 

Gunter, Agnes Watson (Mrs.) Lucama 

Haines, Patricia Durham 

Hairston, Flossie Phillips (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Hall, Elizabeth Denny Belmont 

Hall, Estelle Thomas (Mrs.) Troy 

Hall, Mary Anne Milton 

Hall, Mary Thompson (Mrs.) Spruce Pine 

Hall, Mary Watters Oxford 

Hall, Nuree H Spruce Pine 

Hall, Ruth Woodsdale 

Hames, Alice H. David (Mrs.) Cliffside 

Hamilton, Mary Anne Wilmington 

Hamilton, Melva Williamson (Mrs.) Hamlet 

Hampton, Gwendolyn Leaksville 

Hanley, Thelma A Homestead, Pa. 

Hardee, Verna Wooten (Mrs.) Kinston 

Hardin, Mae G Greensboro 

Harkey, Helen M Sanford 

Harkey, Marie j Charlotte 

Harrill, Geneva Brawley (Mrs.) Woodleaf 

Harris, Diana Winston-Salem 

Harris, Florence M. (Mrs.) Henderson 

Harris, Mary Jane Durham 

Harris, Mildred Rebecca Wall (Mrs.) Jonesville 

Harrison, Virginia Wallton Greensboro 

Hartley, Elizabeth Luccock (Mrs.) Crossnore 

Hartman, Ina B. Leonard (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Hartsell, Mildred Pigg (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hartsell, Woodrow Wilson Kannapolis 

Harvey, Martha Grayson (Mrs.) Forest City 

Hatcher, Eva Pritchet (Mrs. Z. V.) Mount Airy 

Hauser, Clara C Winston-Salem 

Hawkinson, Ruth V Minneapolis, Minn 

Hazelman, Herbert Greensboro 

Hazelman, Mary Frances Bell (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Heckard, Merle Carpenter (Mrs. Cecil) Winston-Salem 

Hedgpeth, James Greensboro 

Hedrick, Margie Greensboro 

Helms, Sarah Anderson Winston-Salem 

Helsabeck, Ruth Ray Winston-Salem 

Helton. Helen Gastonia 



Student List 277 

Hemphill, Lucile C Greensboro 

Hendley, Sadie Wadesboro 

Herbert, Charles E Greensboro 

Hester, Aura Sacrinty (Mrs. Lewis M.) Reidsville 

Heymann, Ruth Ann (Mrs.) Asheville 

Hicks, Frances Barnes (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Higgins, Harper T., Jr Union, S. C. 

Higgins, Hilda R Stocksville 

Higgins, Joanna B Darien, Conn. 

Highsmith, Anne Beatrice Rocky Point 

Hilker, Kathleen W. (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Hill, M. Flayree Union Mills 

Hill, Montgomery S., Jr Greensboro 

Hilton, Mildred Jackson (Mrs.) Elon College 

Hinson, Nancy Elizabeth Kinston 

Hiott, Malynda Anne Kernersville 

Hobbs, Dorothy Ann Greensboro 

Hobbs, Mary Winston-Salem 

Hobgood, Mae F Oxford 

Hobson, Robert E Minneapolis 

Hockett, Alice Pleasant Garden 

Hockett, Patricia Jane Greensboro 

Hodgin, Myray G. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hogshead, Ethel Kearns (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hogshead, Jean Greensboro 

Hogue, Frances K. Booker (Mrs.) High Point 

Holder, Mary Elizabeth Broadway 

Holleman, Terrine Ianthe Cary 

Hollingsworth, Helen George (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hollowell, David R., Jr Greensboro 

Hollowell, Minnie Edenton 

Holt, Edith A. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Holton, Martha K Wilmington 

Homewood, Frances Rose Greensboro 

Hoover, Modene Lael (Mrs. Albert C.) Henderson 

Hopkins, Josephine W Brown Summit 

Home, Margaret Speas (Mrs.) Pfafftown 

Home, Violet Hefner (Mrs.) Wingate 

House, Mary Jane Thelma 

Howard, Dorothy Dunaway Weldon 

Howell, Clingman W McLeansville 

Howell, Lora Frances Foust (Mrs.) McLeansville 

Howerton, R. W. (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Hoyt, Ralph Wadleigh Greensboro 

Hughes, Eleanor W. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Humble, Ralph C. (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Huneycutt, Mary Helen Ross (Mrs.) Albemarle 



278 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Huneycutt, Virginia Anne Raleigh 

Hunt, Emma Elizabeth Gastonia 

Hunt, Mary Charlotte Pleasant Garden 

Hunter, Margaret Ann Greensboro 

Hunter, Walter A Greensboro 

Hurlocker, Margaret Albemarle 

Ingle, Kelsey Huddleson (Mrs.) Gainesville, Fla. 

Ingram, Frances Kernersville 

Ingram, Marguerette Trinity 

Ingram, Virginia Winston-Salem 

Irving, Mildred Louise Greensboro 

Isaacson, Sara Mae Greensboro 

Isley, Lillie Mae Aycock (Mrs.) Staley 

Ivie, Kathleen Leaksville 

Jackson, Clyde Alfred, Jr Greensboro 

Jackson, Hazel Reeves (Mrs.) Durham 

Jackson, Sarah E Washington, N. C. 

Jacoby, Carlotta Barnes (Mrs.) Greensboro 

James, Jeannie Henrietta Greenville, S. C. 

James, Lydia Wilson 

Jarosza, Myra E Graham 

Jarrell, Annie Lee High Point 

Jarvis, Blanche E. Greene (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Jarvis, Sarah Pollocksville 

Jaynes, Hessie Kings Creek 

Jenkins, Bertha H. (Mrs.) Weldon 

Jenkins, Ernest N Brown Summit 

Johnson, Atkin Burnett Dunn 

Johnson, Dorothy O Rose Hill 

Johnson, Earl Frank Greensboro 

Johnston, Anne Merrimon Kelford 

Johnston, Hazel Randleman 

Johnston, Jessie Lee Fayetteville 

Johnston, Ruby (Mrs. A. S.) Wendell 

Jones, Doris, Dorn Greensboro 

Jones, Edna Earle Lee (Mrs.) Dunn 

Jones, Jessie Goodman (Mrs.) Sanford 

Jones, Mary Jane Yanceyville 

Jones, Mary Ruth Hamlet 

Jones, Millicent Teague (Mrs.) Guilford 

Jones, Walter R., Jr., (Mrs.) Rockingham 

Jones, William S Greensboro 

Jordan, Loueasa Johnson (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Jordan, Marilyn Rockmart, Ga. 

Joyce, Jean Morton (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Joyner, Nelle B Franklinton 



Student List 279 

Kalldoff, Ornice Scotten (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Kapp, Ruth Bethania 

Kearns, Clyde L Greensboro 

Kearns, Hazel Lou R. (Mrs.) Denton 

Keiger, Ethel Bollinger (Mrs.) Asheville 

Keller, Dale Franklin Greensboro 

Keller, Mozelle High Point 

Kelley, Mary Joe Winston-Salem 

Kelly, Kathryn Kirby (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Kelly, Robert M Greensboro 

Kendall, Nancy R. (Mrs.) Wadesboro 

Kennedy, Julia (Mrs. M. Hilton) Kinston 

Kennedy, Polly Jean Wallace 

Kerns, Ida Ether 

Kerr, Peggy Ann Greensboro 

Kesler, Frederick Donald Liberty 

Kilpatrick, Jean Greensboro 

King, Margaret Alice Burlington 

King, Annie Laurie Apple (Mrs.) Reidsville 

King, Helen Dry (Mrs.) Cary 

King, Wilma Lillian Greensboro 

Kluttz, Moses Lingle Denton 

Kluttz, Ola Mae McSwain (Mrs.) Denton 

Knight, Louetta Ellen Guilford College 

Knott, Mabel Jones (Mrs.) Oxford 

Knouse, Sarah McKellar (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Knowles, Lucille K Matthews 

Knox, Sara Ruth Bear Poplar 

Koch, Louise Gould (Mrs.) Washington, D. C. 

Kravetsky, Frances E. Williams (Mrs.) Burgaw 

Kuykendall, Pauline I. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Kuykendall, Reagan L Winston-Salem 

Lael, Frances Rhyne (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Lambert, Carrie Lee Oakboro 

Lambeth, Katherine Brown Summit 

Lancaster, Sarah Frances Pikeville 

Land, Alice Thornhill Chase City, Va. 

Lane, Ada Mae Greensboro 

Lane, Dorothy H Lane City, Texas 

Lane, Emmie C. Dark (Mrs.) Siler City 

Lang, Mary Elizabeth Farmville 

Lanier, Alyce Haynes (Mrs.) Lexington 

Laughinghouse, Jane Greenville 

Lavigne, Frances Coggins (Mrs.) High Point 

Law, Marian Geraldine Griffin (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Lawson, Pauline Union Mills 



280 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Lea, Flora Lessie Greensboro 

Lee, Alice Ehrie Benson 

Lee, Ella Ann Smithfield 

Lee, Esther Nelson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Lemonds, Marjorie Millicent Greensboro 

Lentz, Thelma Fraley (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Leonard, Martha J Greensboro 

Leonard, Shirley Elizabeth Greensboro 

Lewis, Amy Walnut Cove 

Lewis, Ellen B. (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Lewis, Fred Elvin, Jr Winston-Salem 

Lewis, Jane Templeman Carthage 

Lewis, John Reade Greensboro 

Lewis, Ralph L., Jr Greensboro 

Lilley, Alma Grey Farmville 

Lilly, George C Greensboro 

Lilly, Thomas Meredith Greensboro 

Lippard, Martha Cordelia Albemarle 

Little, Bill Greensboro 

Lloyd, Marie Efland 

Loftin, Helen E. Bisher (Mrs.) Denton 

Loud, Daisy Alice Red Bank, N. J. 

Love, James Pinckney Merry Hill 

Love, Mary L. (Mrs. Harold R.) High Point 

Lovelace, Iva (Mrs.) Cliffside 

Lovelace, Mary Macclesfield 

Lovin, Fred M High Point 

Lowdermilk, Joseph Greensboro 

Lowdermilk, Robert E Greensboro 

Ludwick, Elizabeth (Mrs.) Salisbury 

Lumsden, Gayle Concord 

Lumsden, Loma Jessolyn Ahoskie 

Luther, Elizabeth (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Lyerly, Doris Salisbury 

Lyke, Mazel Bowles (Mrs.) Asheville 

Lynam, Francie Eleanor Morganton 

McAdams, Frances Marian Wilmington 

McAdams, Merle Spencer 

Mc Arthur, Jeannette Bennett (Mrs.) Greensboro 

McBane, Henry G Burlington 

McBryde, Margaret W. (Mrs.) Reidsville 

McCall, Claire Charlotte 

McCall, Louise Rozier (Mrs.) Marion 

McClure, Dorothy B. (Mrs.) Clarkton 

McClure, Jacqueline New York, N. Y. 

McCollum, Anne Wentworth 



Student List 281 

McConnell, Amanda Lee Greensboro 

McCormick, Harriette Bullard (Mrs.) Rowland 

McCormick, Rachel Fayetteville 

McCoury, Zillian E Senia 

McCreary, Grace Belmont, Mass. 

McDade, Virginia Greensboro 

McDonald, Mary Omohundro (Mrs.) Greensboro 

McDowell, Joyce Greensboro 

McFalls, Frederick Greensboro 

McFalls Janice S Greensboro 

McGinnis, Betty Matthews 

Mclnnis, Jean Pleasant Garden 

Mclntyre, Ruby Perry (Mrs.) New London 

McKeel, Hazel Walstonburg 

McKinney, Ruth S Bakersville 

McLaurin, Clelon Moore Clio, S. C. 

McLean, Lucy Rankin (Mrs. Chas. E.) Mt. Holly 

McLean, Margaret Greensboro 

McLemore, Ethel Wade 

McLeod, Frances Alexander (Mrs.) Chapel Hill 

McMahan, Margaret Mocksville 

McMillan, Carra Margaret Stedman 

McMurray, Helen J. (Mrs. C. W.) Marion 

McNair, Elinor Sanford 

McNairy, Beverly Greensboro 

McNew, Eugenia Parks Winston-Salem 

McPherson, Grace Lawrence (Mrs.) Snow Camp 

Mackie, Florence C Guilford College 

Maclin, Henry Greensboro 

Madden, Helen Margaret (Mrs.) Yadkinville 

Madlin, Mary G. Bailey (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Makely, George M., Jr Greensboro 

Mamber, Helen Miami Beach, Fla. 

Maness, Marie Robbins 

Marchman, Eleanor Rowena (Mrs.) Plant City, Fla. 

Markus, Annie Laurie Bass (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Marsh, Frances Anne Charlotte 

Marsh, Sylvia Leake (Mrs.) Lexington 

Martel, Dorothy Waynesville 

Martin, Ann R. (Mrs.) Elon College 

Martin, Arline Jenkins (Mrs.) Lewisville 

Martin, Elvira Donalds, S. C. 

Martin, Floyd A Winston-Salem 

Martin, Frances Killingsworth (Mrs. L. T.) Charlotte 

Martin, Margaret K. Shepard (Mrs.) Liberty 

Martin, Pauline Davis (Mrs.) Reidsville 



282 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Matlock, Jack Faust, Jr Greensboro 

Matthews, Irma Blanche East Bend 

Matthews, Lucy Belle East Bend 

Matthews, Mamie East Bend 

Matthews, Sarah Griffith (Mrs.) Spring Hope 

Matthews, Troy A Winston- Salem 

Mauney, Margaret Stroup (Mrs.) Dobson 

Maus, Lucille Haizlip (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Meador, Robinette Reidsville 

Mecum, Jennie Walkertown 

Meinung, Hallie Haulbrook (Mrs. Fred) Winston- Salem 

Melton, Norma T. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Melvin, Charles E Greensboro 

Mendenhall, Valeria High Point 

Merritt, Ruth Willard Lexington 

Miller, Agnes Pratt (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Miller, Elberta Murray (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Miller, Kenneth T Jamestown 

Miller, Margaret Jo Statesville 

Miller, Virginia C. (Mrs.) China Grove 

Millikan, Dawson Greensboro 

Mills, Elma Blanton (Mrs. V. R.) Forest City 

Minor, Vauda Merrill (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Mitchell, Betty Lou Burlington 

Mitchell, J. Elwood, Jr Greensboro 

Mitchell, Sally Perkinson (Mrs.) Wise 

Moeller, Marilyn Towson, Md. 

Moody, Sylvia Siler City 

Moore, Annie Tucker Littleton 

Moore, Barbara Maynard Tarboro 

Moore, Carolyn Reidsville 

Moore, Margaret Alice Greensboro 

Moore, Margaret Yeamans Wilmington 

Moore, Muriel Mocksville 

Moore, Norma Geddie Matthews 

Moore, William T Greensboro 

Moring, Platte B., Jr Greensboro 

Morrill, Florence Wilson 

Morris, Peggy Albemarle 

Morris, Robert Atlantic 

Morrison, Elizabeth B. (Mrs.) Harrisburg 

Morton, Martha R Niles, Ohio 

Morton, Thelma H. (Mrs.) Proctorville 

Morton, Wilma M Albemarle 

Moser, Myrtle Folger (Mrs.) Zebulon 

Moses, Imogene Pittsboro 



Student List 283 

Moton, Beulah High Point 

Motsinger, Lula Winston- Salem 

Murray, Margaret L. (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Muse, Geraldine V. Carthage 

Nanney, Joyce Weeks (Mrs.) Mt. Gilead 

Neal, Allene Greensboro 

Neal, Willie Bennett (Mrs.) Stokesdale 

Neale, Ersell Doris Greensboro 

Nesbitt, Rozell Shomolis (Mrs.) Waynesville 

Neville, Clara B. L. (Mrs.) Pembroke 

Newlin, Marianna Greensboro 

Newman, Wanda Jean Davis (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Newman, Louise Williams (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Newton, Maude M. (Mrs. R. Z.) Burlington 

Niblock, Mary Concord 

Nichols, Charles E Greensboro 

Nicholson, Kathleen F. (Mrs.) Monroe 

Nicholson, Waller S Guilford College 

Niemyer, Lorraine Myers (Mrs.) Hamlet 

Nifong, Doris Hamlin (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Nolan, Edna Mae James (Mrs.) Clyde 

Norfleet, Dorothy Ann Greensboro 

Norman, Atha East Bend 

Norman, Bessie Mae Thurmond 

Norman, Elizabeth Janet Greensboro 

Norton, Doris Lee Raeford 

Norwood, Mary Ashley Brevard 

Oates, James Graham Greensboro 

O'Brien, Claudia (Mrs.) Leaksville 

O'Connor, Frances Greensboro 

Ogburn, Lu Long Smithfield 

Ogilvie, Caroline North Wilkesboro 

Oliveira, Edla Gabriel de Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil 

Oliver, Graddie Greensboro 

Omohundro, Warren W Greensboro 

Oppelt, J. L. (Mrs.) Greenville 

Orrell, Mildred Adeline Winston-Salem 

Orren, Sara Reidsville 

Osborne, Berta Hollady Greensboro 

Osborne, Maxie Moore (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Osborne, Theresa Pearson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Osborne, Tom, Jr Greensboro 

Outlaw, Carolyn Garrison Kenansville 

Outlaw, Pauline Seven Springs 

Outlaw, Sarah West Kenansville 

Outlaw, Elizabeth Jordan Mount Olive 



284 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Overby, Marion Greensboro 

Owen, Lucille Harris (Mrs.) Steeds 

Page, Elizabeth Nanney (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Page, Eula Greensboro 

Palmer, Zora H. (Mrs.) Senia 

Park, Ruth Greensboro 

Parker, Anne Stevens Greensboro 

Parker, Annie Pearle Raleigh 

Parker, Norma Jacksonville 

Parker, Rosa Blakeney (Mrs.) Albemarle 

Parker, Rosa Williams (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Parker, Ruby Isley (Mrs.) Mamers 

Pattee, Mary E Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Patterson, Fred Samuel, Jr Greensboro 

Patterson, Mary Virginia St. Pauls 

Patterson, Thomas H., Jr Greensboro 

Patterson, Virginia Francis (Mrs.) King 

Payne, Gold Hampton (Mrs.) Elkin 

Peacock, Cletis E Greensboro 

Pearman, Gladys Outlaw (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Pearman, Walter R., Jr Greensboro 

Pecoraino, Zina Greensboro 

Peeler, Gwendolyn Kannapolis 

Pegram, Agnes Lee Henderson 

Penry, Sadye M. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Perkins, Thurman T Goldsboro 

Perry, John R. (Mrs.) Thomasville 

Phelps, Wilma Ash 

Phillips, Mary Elizabeth Asheboro 

Phillips, Mary Ann Greensboro 

Phillips, Ruth Cook (Mrs.) Dalton 

Phipps, Fred M., Jr Greensboro 

Pickard, Elizabeth McNeill (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Pilkenton, Amy Franklinville 

Pilley, Helen Louise Pantego 

Pittman, Rosina Scotland Neck 

Pitts, Vera Elizabeth Newberry, S. C. 

Pleasant, Rosebud Danville, Va. 

Plumblee, M. Q Burlington 

Polk, Marion Knox Greensboro 

Pollard, Martha E. (Mrs.) Columbia 

Pool, Zilphia Greensboro 

Poole, Doris Lee Raleigh 

Poole, Maggie Ethel Durham 

Poovey, William A Leaksville 

Pope, Mary Elizabeth Mount Olive 



Student List 285 

Poston, Rada Marguerite High Point 

Potts, Linnet Winston- Salem 

Potts, Winnie Davis (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Powers, Faison C. (Mrs.) St. Pauls 

Pratt, Jessie Elizabeth Draper 

Price, Chattie Isabell Monroe 

Price, Nona H Clinton 

Price, Vera Elizabeth Asheville 

Proctor, Sylvester Raleigh 

Proffitt, Winnie Wilson Bakersville 

Queen, Helen Eunice Lawndale 

Quinn, Faye Beulaville 

Quinn, Hilda Nell Beulaville 

Racster, Alva B Winston-Salem 

Raper, Annie L Welcome 

Raper, Grace Caudle (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Ratchf ord, Helen Jeanette Gastonia 

Ray, Mary Jane Mebane 

Ray, Jean Mebane 

Ray, Bessie Reine Clark (Mrs. S. Philip) Leaksville 

Read, Thelma Martin Halifax 

Reese, Rachel Powers (Mrs.) Vass 

Reid, Katherine Margaret Pilot Mountain 

Reitzel, Nannie D. (Mrs.) , Elon College 

Reitzel, Raymond C Liberty 

Renegar, Peggy Lee Yadkinville 

Reynolds, David R Randleman 

Reynolds, Jacqueline Leland 

Rice, Margaret Hurdle Mills 

Richardson, Betty Beam (Mrs.) Lenoir 

Richardson, Thaxton, Jr Greensboro 

Riddle, Ruby Virginia Greensboro 

Ridge, Emma Farmer 

Rigney, Eleanor Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Riley, Luna Hudspeth (Mrs.) Pleasant Garden 

Rink, Virginia H. (Mrs. James) Mount Airy 

Ritch, Perry Holmes Greensboro 

Roberson, Betty Lea Greensboro 

Roberson, Marylynn Bonner Walkertown 

Roberts, Ida Herman (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Roberts, Ida Williamston 

Roberts, Ruth J Barnard 

Robertson, Anne F. (Mrs.) Madison 

Robinson, Rosalyn F Morven 

Romef elt, Mary Glen Rock, N. J. 

Ross, Frances Kerr (Mrs.) Charlotte 



286 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Rouse, Carolina Trenholm (Mrs.) LaGrange 

Routh, Daisy Lee Moore (Mrs.) Liberty 

Routh, A. Paul Greensboro 

Rowe, Gladys Aberdeen 

Royster, Ann E Henderson 

Royster, Lillie Beatrice Spray 

Rucker, Lilla Campbell (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Rudd, Anne John Reidsville 

Rumley, Ruby Winston-Salem 

Rusher, Mae P. (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Russell, Ellen Colville High Point 

Sadler, Robert L Greensboro 

Sampson, Dorothy Morehead City 

Sapp, Jessie Macon Greensboro 

Sarles, Frederick William, Jr Greensboro 

Sarratt, Ruby Moss Whitsett 

Saunders, Elsie Anderson (Mrs.) Jamestown 

Saunders, Mary Lela Danville, Va. 

Savage, Imogene Willard 

Scott, Charles H Madison 

Scroggs, Addie Lucille Moravian Falls 

Scruggs, Mary Crowell (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Sealy, Gladys Barnesville 

Seay, Russell Martin (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Sechrest, Joanne High Point 

Self, Ruth Lee Spartanburg, S. C. 

Sessoms, Claude Greensboro 

Setzer, Betty E Newton 

Shackford, Virginia Jr. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Shankle, Elizabeth Laura Polkton 

Sharpe, Carrie A Reidsville 

Sharpe, Elizabeth M Madison 

Sharpe, Frank Greensboro 

Sharpe, Marie V. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Shaw, Joe (Miss) Shelby 

Shearin, Rose Ann Rocky Mount 

Shepard, Mona Sanborn Southern Pines 

Shepherd, Clea Hildan Greensboro 

Shepherd, Hurley S Gibsonville 

Shepherd, Mary Laurinburg 

Sherrill, Sarah Greensboro 

Sherrod, Kate C. (Mrs.) Enfield 

Shields, Margaret Kinlaw (Mrs.) Robbins 

Shine, Ruth Reilly (Mrs.) Goldsboro 

Shipman, Kathryn Weaver (Mrs.) High Point 

Shive, Dorothy Herring (Mrs.) Albemarle 



Student List , 287 

Shore, Clifford E Pleasant Garden 

Shuffler, Ila Marie Raleigh 

Shuping, Jerry M Asheboro 

Siceloff , Bess High Point 

Siebert, Florence G. (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Silver, Don High Point 

Silver, Frank C Greensboro 

Simpson, Charles Harrison Greensboro 

Simpson, Howard Holmes Stoneville 

Sinclair, Annie Gattis (Mrs.) West End 

Sink, Kathryn Lexington 

Sink, Mildred F Greensboro 

Skelton, Aubrey Lee Greensboro 

Slaughter, Rosa Christine Roxboro 

Sledge, Ruth Graham 

Small, Lillian Minerva Germanton 

Smathers, Mildred Hubbard (Mrs.) McLeansville 

Smith, Alyse Burlington 

Smith, Auta Oakboro 

Smith, Bonnie J. (Mrs.) Asheville 

Smith, Carolyn Sykes Lemon Springs 

Smith, Davilla Winston- Salem 

Smith, Elizabeth Hahn (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Smith, Emma Felton (Mrs.) Littleton 

Smith, Harriet Blanche Stanfield 

Smith, Irene M. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Smith, M. Jack Winston-Salem 

Smith, Janie (Mrs. T. M.) Reidsville 

Smith, Mildred Kittrell 

Smith, Ralph (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Smith, Rebecca McCulloch (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Smith, M. Ruth Shelby 

Smith, Sallie Hampton Lincolnton 

Smitherman, Lillian Davis (Mrs.) East Bend 

Snider, Albert M Denton 

Somers, Howard A Winston-Salem 

Sorrell, Helen Ross Clayton 

Southern, Lillian Smith (Mrs.) Walnut Cove 

Sparger, Alma Mitchell Mount Airy 

Sparger, Sara Snow (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Sparrow, Stella V Crossnore 

Speas, Rosa Lee Winston-Salem 

Spencer, Eutha High Point 

Spratt, Frances Marion Mt. Holly 

Spratt, Sybil Nebo 

Sprinkle, Ethel Winston-Salem 



288 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Spruill, Eugenia Sessoms (Mrs.) Windsor 

Staley, Ava McArthur (Mrs.) Staley 

Staley, Evelyn Blackwell (Mrs.) Staley 

Stallings, Jean Erwin 

Stanfield, Dorothy Brown Summit 

Steed, Neola Elizabeth High Point 

Steele, Hazel Virginia Greensboro 

Stephenson, Frances Reidsville 

Steward, Herman D Walkertown 

Stewart, Evelyn High Point 

Stewart, Florence Greensboro 

Stewart, Julius Mark Greensboro 

Stiller, Corinne Salisbury 

Stillwell, David Ferdinand Winston- Salem 

Stimson, Mary J. Dorrity (Mrs.) Morganton 

Stone, Mary Kathryn Lumberton 

Stoneham, Helen M Mollusk, Va. 

Strange, Louise Concord 

Street, Irene Gibson Roxboro 

Strother, Louise Franklinton 

Stroupe, Nellie James Hamlet 

Stuart, Emma C. Lively (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Styers, Edward Lee Greensboro 

Sutker, Edith Greensboro 

Swaim, Mary Louise Asheboro 

Swinson, Edwina Columbus, Ga. 

Talley, Martha Lynn Greensboro 

Talley, Ruth Elaine Greensboro 

Tatum, Mary Ellington (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Taylor, Elizabeth (Mrs.) Milton 

Taylor, Florence Foster (Mrs.) Blanch 

Taylor, Frances Frazier (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Teague, J. S. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Teague, E. Marie Asheboro 

Teal, Mildred Leon McFarlan 

Tedder, Margaret Mills (Mrs.) Mt. Gilead 

Teer, Lydia Chapel Hill 

Temple, Kenneth E Greensboro 

Tenglund, Mildred Jackson Clinton 

Thomas, Doris Jean Durham 

Thomas, Mary Jane Winston-Salem 

Thomas, Mildred Wingate 

Thomas, Willie Needham (Mrs.) Jackson Springs 

Thompson, Annabel High Point 

Thompson, Evangeline T. (Mrs.) Dunn 

Thompson, Jeannette Goldsboro 



Student List 289 

Thompson, Maxine Whiteville 

Thompson, Peggy Durham 

Thompson, Virginia Dare Whitakers 

Thornberg, Nannie Louise Raeford 

Thorne, Dorothy Selma 

Toenes, George Greensboro 

Tolson, Ellie (Mrs. W. H.) Greenville 

Townsend, Jean McLucas Clarkton 

Townsend, S. Marguerite Maxton 

Trevathan, Vivian Dodson 

Tribble, Julia M Donalds, S.C. 

Tucker, Idelle Penington Charlotte 

Tucker, William E., Jr Greensboro 

Turlington, Sarah Helen Clinton 

Turner, Marion Greensboro 

Umberger, Beulah Dwyer (Mrs.) Mount Ulla 

Umstead, Nell D Durham 

Underwood, Myrtle S. (Mrs.) Brown Summit 

Underwood, Walter Doub, Jr Greensboro 

Upchurch, Carolyn Moore (Mrs.) Milton 

Valentine, Myrtle V Mount Airy 

Van Deventer, John Beaufort 

Vannoy, Evelyn Dare West Jefferson 

Vaught, Nancy S. (Mrs. S. H.) Fort Payne, Ala. 

Vollbracht, Euzelia Mc Swain (Mrs.) Kings Mountain 

Waas, Leonard A Greensboro 

Waddell, Anna Lee Wadesboro 

Walker, Elizabeth Walton (Mrs.) Morganton 

Walker, Nellie Carroll (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Walker, Wilsie A Greensboro 

Wall, Gertrude C. (Mrs.) Wadesboro 

Wall, Helen Anne Lilesville 

Wallace, Sidney Gaston Tobaccoville 

Walters, Carolyn Greensboro 

Waltman, Virginia Rea Matthews 

Walton, Nina Asheboro 

Warden, Dorothy Yadkinville 

Warden, Rosa Lee Yadkinville 

Ware, Emma Corey (Mrs.) St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Warlick, Ada Wright (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Warren, Addison Exum Greensboro 

Warren, James R Greensboro 

Warren, Ruth B. (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Washburn, Mary High Point 

Waters, Christine T. (Mrs.) Clinton 



290 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Waters, Frances Tuxedo 

Waters, Mary Sue Tuxedo 

Watkins, Lydia Anne Blanche 

Watson, Annie Bowen (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Watson, Eliza A. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Watson, Virginia F Clinton 

Way, Marguerite Waynesville 

Waye, Anneta Smith (Mrs.) Brown Summit 

Weathers, Ola Shelby 

Weaver, Imajean Hoppers (Mrs.) High Point 

Webster, Irma Price (Mrs.) Madison 

Webster, Vera R. (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Welborn, Ruth High Point 

Weldon, John B Greensboro 

Wells, Eldred Evans Kinston 

Wells, Marie Cedar Grove 

Wells, Norman E Pleasant Garden 

Wells, Rupert W., Jr Greensboro 

West, Emma Faye Kinston 

West, Gladys Gaskins, (Mrs.) New Bern 

Wescott, Essie N. (Mrs.) Manteo 

Wester, Annie H Raleigh 

Westmoreland, Blanche Margaret Walkertown 

Wheeler, Peggy Anne Walnut Cove 

White, Ann Sherrill Mooresville 

White, Elizabeth Tyner 

White, Frances Marie Wendell 

White, F. Murray Winston-Salem 

White, James Hugh Winston-Salem 

White, Mabel Hauser (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

White, Nellie Ricks (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

White, Pearle Belvidere 

White, Virginia Dare Hobgood 

Whitehurst, Carl David Greenville 

Whitfield, Susan Elizabeth Asheboro 

Whitfield Susan K. (Mrs. Lewis E.) Asheboro 

Whitley, Dan P High Point 

Whitson, Madeline Bryant (Mrs.) Ewart 

Wilkins, Sarah Wytheville, Va. 

Williams, Anna Faye Rusk 

Williams, Esther Yarbrough (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Williams, Eunice Whitley (Mrs.) Rocky Mount 

Williams, Jacqueline Middlesex 

Williams, Jean Elizabeth New Bern 

Wiliams, Mary Norman (Mrs.) Winston- Salem 

Williams, Mitchell Ellen Kings Mountain 



Student List 291 

Williams, Nancy P Elizabeth City 

Williams, Priscilla Talbutt Durham 

Williams, Royall Eugene Greensboro 

Williams, Sally Caudle (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Williamson, Alice R. (Mrs.) Swan Quarter 

Williamson, Mildred Wadesboro 

Wilson, Edith Barrett (Mrs. Raine) Roanoke Rapids 

Wilson, Eugenia Green (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Wilson, Margaret Hayes Conway, S. C. 

Wilson, Reba New Mt. Olive 

Wimbish, Betty Carroll Greensboro 

Winborne, Bernice A. (Mrs.) Harrellsville 

Winfree, Betsy Joan Greensboro 

Winslow, Sidney Arthur Rural Hall 

Wiseman, Eva Antoinette Burlington 

Wishon, Joseph Harding Lewisville 

Wolfe, Peggy J Albemarle 

Woodard, Reba Laurel Hill 

Woolf, Ruby Aida Winston-Salem 

Woollen, Frances Evelyn High Point 

Wooten, Ann McRae Chadbourn 

Wooten, Verna Kinston 

Wootton, James Gordon Reidsville 

Worsley, Annie Hazel Rocky Mount 

Worthington, Mary Grifton 

Wray, Mary Walker (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Wren, Cora Lambe (Mrs. Junius) Siler City 

Wrenn, Mayme Clarice W. (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Wright, Christine Goodyear (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Wright, William V Greensboro 

Wyche, C. Elizabeth Welden 

Wylie, Elizabeth Marion 

Wyrick, Ruby H. (Mrs. M. O.) Gibsonville 

Yarborough, Martha Louisburg 

Yates, Beulah Upchurch Elkin 

Yelton, Sylvia Sue Bakersville 

Yelverton, Mae Elizabeth Fremont 

Yokeley, M. Lema Winston-Salem 

York, Etta Ballard (Mrs.) Kipling 

York, Georgia Greensboro 

Younce, Louise Spencer 

Young, Christine Graham 

Young. Lilly Gilly (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Yow, Martie Ann Greensboro 

Zeiger, Sally- Ann Greensboro 

Zimmerman, Blanche Raper (Mrs. A. M.) Winston-Salem 



IX. INDEX 



PAGE 

Academic assistants 21 

Academic and Personnel Committee 27, 73 

Academic assistants 21 

Academic regulations 73 

Administrative Council of the 

University 8 

Admission of students 

to advanced standing 57 

to the College 56 

to service women 57 

general requirements 56 

specific requirements 56 

Advisers, see Class chairmen and 
academic advisers 

Alumnae Association 40 

Art, Department of 79 

Art, Dance, Drama, 

Interdepartmental Major 62 

Astronomy 150 

Attendance 77 

Auditing courses 74 

Bachelor of Arts degree, 

requirements for 58 

Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, 

requirements for 70 

Bachelor of Science in 

Business Education and Secretarial 

Administration 69 

Home Economics 66 

Music 175 

Nursing 70 

Physical Education 67 

Bachelor of Science degrees 

curricula in 66, 67, 69, 70 

requirements for 66,67,69,70 

Biology, Department of 87 

Buildings and grounds 31 

Business Education and Secretarial 
Administration 

courses in 93 

curricula in 69 

Department of 93 

graduate courses in 98 

Master's degree in 93, 98, 195 

Calendar, College 3 

Change of course 74 

Chapel 37 

Chemistry, Department of 100 

Choir 193 

Civic Music Association, see 

Lectures and Concerts 
Class chairmen and academic 

advisers 73 

Classical Civilization, Department of... 103 

Classification of students 75 

Clubs 40 

College, the history of 30 

Commercial Department 197 

Committees of the faculty, standing ... 27 

Community, the College 36 

Counselors in residence halls 22 

Course, change of 74 

Credit 74 

Curry School 109 

Dean's List 78 

Deficiencies 75 

292 



PAGE 
Degrees 

conferred in 1948 206 

general requirements for 64 

kind granted by the College 31 

requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts 58 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 70 

Bachelor of Science . . 65, 66, 67, 69, 70 

Master's 93, 113 

Delta Pi Epsilon 40 

Departmental major 60 

Dramatics 38 

Dropping courses 74 

Economics, Department of 106 

Education, Department of 

courses in 109 

Department of 109 

Master's degree 113, 116 

Electives in Bachelor of Science 

courses for Bachelor of Art students. 65 

English, Department of 117 

Enrollment summary 218 

Entrance deficiencies 75 

Examinations 

entrance 56 

proficiency 77 

semester 76 

Exclusion from College 78 

Expenses 44 

Extension 

credits 76 

Division of 43 

Extra hours of work 74 

Faculty and staff 

alphabetical list of 199 

in order of seniority 9 

Fees 44 

Fellowships and scholarships 48 

Fields of concentration 60 

French 166 

Freshman-Sophomore requirements .... 59 
Freshman Week 73 

Geography, Department of 127 

German, Department of 129 

Government of the College 36 

Grade of courses 59, 64, 79 

Grades, see Reports 

Graduate assistants 21 

Graduate School 195 

Graduate Work 93, 98, 113, 138-147 

Greek 104 

Health 

Department of 131 

Service in 35 

History 132 

History and Political Science, 

Department of 132 

Home Economics 

courses in 137 

curricula in 66 

graduate courses in 138-147 

Department of 137 

Master's degree in 137, 148 



Index 



293 



PAGE 

Home Economics Foundation 41 

Honors, graduation with 78 

Honors Work 61 

Infirmary 35, 36 

Interdepartmental majors 60, 62, 63 

Italian 172 

Junior-Senior requirements 60 

Laboratories and studios 32 

Laboratory fees 47 

Laboratory technician 60 

Latin 104 

Lectures and concerts 38 

Library 

extension service 43 

staff of 21 

the 34 

Library Education (Science) 113 

Loan funds 51 

Majors 60 

Master's degree 93, 98, 113, 116, 137, 138, 195 

Mathematics, Department of 148 

Medical service, see Health 

Music 

choir 193 

contest festival 193 

courses in 180 

curricula in 176 

Department of, see School of 

orchestra 193 

recitals 192 

School of 175 

Nursing 

curriculum in 70 

degree in 70 

Officers 

of administration 9 

of instruction 9 

other officers 23 

Omicron Nu 40 

Organizations 39 

Phi Beta Kappa 40, 217 

Philosophy, Department of 151 

Physical Education 

courses in 151 

curricula in 67 

Department of 151 

Physics, Department of 160 

Pi Kappa Lambda 40, 194 

Placement Bureau 43 



PAGE 

Play-Likers 39 

Political Science 136 

Premedical students 59, 60 

Proficiency examinations 77 

Psychology, Department of 163 

Publications 42 

Public Relations 43 

Quality Points 75 

Radio 38 

Recreation Association 40 

Recreation, Interdepartmental Major . . 63 

Re-examinations 76 

Registration 73 

Regulations, general 74 

Religion 37 

Reports 77 

Residence halls 33 

Residence requirements 75 

Romance Languages, Department of . . . 166 

Scholarships 48 

Secretarial Administration, see 

Business Education and 

Secretaries and other assistants 23 

Self-help 43 

Senior requirements 60 

Service women 57 

Sigma Delta Pi 40 

Social life 37 

Social Work, Preprofessional Program. 64 

Societies 39 

Sociology, Department of 172 

Sophomore requirements 59 

Spanish 170 

Special students 47 

Sports 38 

Student health 35 

Student load 74 

Students, number of, see 

Enrollment summary 
Studios, see Laboratories and 
Summer session and Extension 

credits 76 

Tau Psi Omega 40 

Textbooks 47 

Training School, see Curry School 

Transcript of record 78 

Trustees 

Board of 5 

Executive Committee of 5 

University sermons 37 

Y. W. C. A 39